Production, Industrial Organization, and Regulation in Agriculture  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 201 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Economics 201A or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Description: Basic concepts of micro and welfare economics: partial and general equilibrium. Industrial organization: monopolistic competition, vertical integration, price discrimination, and economics of information with applications to food retailing, cooperatives, fishing, and energy.
(F)
 
Issues and Concepts in Agricultural Economics  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 202 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Economics 201A-201B or consent of instructor.
Description: History, institutions, and policies affecting agriculture markets and environmental quality. Producer behavior over time and under uncertainty. Asset fixity and agricultural supply models.
(SP)
 
Probability and Statistics  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 210 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
Description: This is an introduction to probability theory and statistical inference. It is primarily intended to prepare students for the graduate econometrics courses 212 and 213. The emphasis of the course is on the principles of statistical reasoning. Probability theory will be discussed mainly as a background for statistical theory and specific models will, for the most part, be considered only to illustrate the general statistical theory as it is developed.
(F)
 
Mathematical Methods for Agricultural and Resource Economists  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 211 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: The goal of this course is to provide entering graduate students with the basic skills required to perform effectively in the graduate program and as professional economists. The lectures place heavy emphasis on intuition, graphical representations, and conceptual understanding. Weekly problem sets provide the opportunity to master mechanical skills and computational techniques. Topics covered include real analysis, linear algebra, multivariable calculus, theory of static constrained optimization, and comparative statics.
(F)
 
Econometrics: Multiple Equation Estimation  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 212 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 211 or consent of instructor.
Description: Introduction to the estimation and testing of economic models. Includes analysis of the general linear model, asymptotic theory, instrumental variable, and the generalized method of moments. In addition, a survey of time series, analysis, limited dependent variables.
(SP)
 
Applied Econometrics  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 213 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of computer laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 211 and 212 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Description: Standard and advanced econometric techniques are applied to topics in agriculture and resource economics. Techniques include limited dependent variables, time series analysis, and nonparametric analysis. Students will use computers to conduct statistical analyses.
(F)
 
New Econometric and Statistical Techniques  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 214 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of computer lab per week.
Prerequisites: 211, 213 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Description: Theory and application of new and emerging approaches to estimation and inference. Bayesian, maximum entropy,and other new applications to economic problems will be emphasized. Students will use computers to conduct statistical analyses.
(SP)
 
Econometric Project Workshop  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 219A [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 210, 211, and 212 or consent of instructor.
Description: Techniques for preparing econometric studies, including finding data sources, the reporting of results, and standards for placing research questions with existent literature. With faculty guidance, students prepare approved econometric projects, present projects to the class, provide comments on other student projects, and revise projects in response to faculty and student comments.
(F,SP)
 
Econometric Project Workshop  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 219B [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 210, 211, and 212 or consent of instructor.
Grading option: 219A must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis; 219B must be taken for a letter grade.
Description: Techniques for preparing econometric studies, including finding data sources, the reporting of results, and standards for placing research questions with existent literature. With faculty guidance, students prepare approved econometric projects, present projects to the class, provide comments on other student projects, and revise projects in response to faculty and student comments.
(F,SP)
 
Empirical International Trade and Investment  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 232 [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Empirical aspects on international trade, foreign investment, and the environment. Issues related to testing various trade models. Topics include: testing trade models (HO, Ricardo, Specific Sector); gravity models; linkages between openness and growth; trade orientation and firm performance; pattern of trade; trade and the environment; labor markets and trade. New topics in international trade with empirical applications, such as trade models with heterogeneous firms, outsourcing and foreign investment.
(SP)
 
Economics and Policy of Production, Technology and Risk in Agricultural and Natural Resources  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 241 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 201 and 202, or Economics 201A-201B, or consent of instructor.
Description: This course covers alternative models of production, resource and environmental risk management; family production function; adoption and diffusion; innovation and intellectual property rights; agricultural and environmental policies and their impact on production and the environment; water resources; pest control; biotechnology; and optimal control over space and time.
(F)
 
Quantitative Policy Analysis  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 242 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 211 or consent of instructor.
Description: Production versus predatory government behavior, rent seeking, social waste, and their trade-offs with the provision of growth-promoting public goods. Three failure types are distinguished: market, government, and organizational. The roles of public versus special interests are modeled to determine degree and extent of organizational failures in collective group behavior. Alternative frameworks are used to evaluate various types of policy reform.
(SP)
 
Agricultural, Food, and Resource Policy Workshop  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 249 [1 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Presentation and criticism of ongoing research by faculty, staff and students. Not necessarily offered every semester.
(F,SP)
 
Microeconomics of Development  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) C251 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Theoretical and empirical analyses of poverty and inequality, household and community behavior, and contract and institutions in the context of developing countries. Also listed as Economics C270A.
(F)
 
International Economic Development Policy  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) C253 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Minimum one semester of graduate-level microeconomics and statistics or consent of instructor.
Description: This course emphasizes the development and application of policy solutions to developing-world problems related to poverty, macroeconomic policy, and environmental sustainability. Methods of statistical, economic, and policy analysis are applied to a series of case studies. The course is designed to develop practical professional skills for application in the international arena. Also listed as Public Policy C253.
(F)
 
Rural Economic Development Workshop  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 259 [1 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Presentation and criticism of ongoing research by faculty, staff and students. Not necessarily offered every semester.
(F,SP)
 
Environmental and Resource Economics  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 261 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Ph.D.-level economic theory or consent of instructor.
Description: Theory of renewable and nonrenewable natural resource use, with applications to forests, fisheries, energy, and climate change. Resources, growth, and sustainability. Economic theory of environmental policy. Externality; the Coasian critique; tax incidence and anomalies; indirect taxes; the double dividend; environmental standards; environmental regulation; impact of uncertainty on taxes and standards; mechanism design; monitoring, penalties, and regulatory strategy; emissions markets.
(F)
 
Non-market Valuation  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 262 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Ph.D.-level economic theory or consent of instructor.
Description: The economic concept of value; historical evolution of market and non-market valuation; revealed preference methods: single site demand, multi-site demand, corner solution models, and valuation of quality changes; averting behavior; the hedonic method; contingent valuation; other stated preference methods: ranking, choice, conjoint analysis; the value of life and safety; sampling and questionnaire design for valuation surveys.
(SP)
 
Dynamic Methods in Environmental and Resource Economics  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 263 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Ph.D.-level economic theory or consent of instructor.
Description: This course studies methods of analysis and optimal control of dynamic systems, emphasizing applications in environmental and natural resource economics. Continuous-time deterministic models are studied using phase plane analysis, the calculus of variations, the Maximum Principle, and dynamic programming. Numerical methods are applied to discrete time stochastic and deterministic dynamic models.
(F)
 
Empirical Energy and Environmental Economics  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 264 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 212 and 213; or equivalent.
Description: This course is designed to help prepare graduate students to conduct empirical research in energy and environmental economics. The course has two broad objectives. The first is to develop an in-depth understanding of specific empirical methods and research designs that are routinely used in the field of energy and environmental economics. The second is to familiarize students with some of the economic theories and institutions that are most relevant to empirical work in this area.
(SP) Fowlie
 
Natural Resource Economics Workshop  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 269 [1 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Presentation and criticism of ongoing research by faculty, staff, and students. Not necessarily offered every semester.
(F,SP)
 
Special Study for Graduate Students  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 298 [1-6 units]
Course Format: Individual study.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: All properly qualified graduate students who wish to pursue a special field of study may do so if their proposed program of study is acceptable to the member here of the staff with whom they work.
(F,SP)
 
Individual Research  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 299 [1-12 units]
Course Format: Approximately four hours of research per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Professional Preparation: Teaching of Environmental Economics and Policy  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 375 [1-6 units]
Course Format: Four hours of work per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, appointment as a graduate student instructor, or consent of instructor.
Formerly Agriculture and Resource Economics 300
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Discussion, problem review and development, guidance of discussion classes, course development, supervised practice teaching.
(F,SP)
 
Professional Training in Research Methodology  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 400 [1-6 units]
Course Format: Individual research.
Prerequisites: Graduate student researcher appointment.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Individual training for graduate students in planning and performing research under the supervision of a faculty adviser, intended to provide academic credit for the experience obtained while holding a research assistantship.
(F,SP)
 
Individual Study for Doctoral Students  --  Agricultural and Resource Economics  (A,RESEC) 602 [1-12 units]
Course Format: Individual study.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required for candidates of the Ph.D. May not be used for unit or residence requirements for the doctoral degree.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Environmental Economics and Policy  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C1 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 32.
Credit option: Students will receive 2 units of credit for C1 after taking Economics 1.
Description: Introduction to microeconomics with emphasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental issues. Also listed as Economics C3.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 39 
Course Format: Seminar format.
Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sophomores.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.
(F,SP)
 
 --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 39D [1.5-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Microeconomic Theory with Application to Natural Resources  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 100 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: C1 or Economics 1 or C3 and Mathematics 16A or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive 2 units of credit for Economics 100A, Economics 101A, or Undergraduate Business Administration 110 after taking 100.
Description: Covers the basic microeconomic tools for further study of natural resource problems. Theory of consumption, production, theory of the firm, industrial organization, general equilibrium, public goods and externalities. Applications to agriculture and natural resources.
(F,SP) Ligon and Rausser
 
Environmental Economics  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C101 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Environmental Economics and Policy 100, or Economics 100A or 101A.
Description: Theories of externalities and public goods applied to pollution and environmental policy. Trade-off between production and environmental amenities. Assessing nonmarket value of environmental amenities. Remediation and clean-up policies. Environment and development. Biodiversity management. Also listed as Economics C125.
(SP) Zilberman
 
Natural Resource Economics  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C102 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Environmental Economics and Policy 100, or Economics 100A or 101A.
Description: Introduction to the economics of natural resources. Land and the concept of economic rent. Models of optimal depletion of nonrenewable resources and optimal use of renewable resources. Application to energy, forests, fisheries, water, and climate change. Resources, growth, and sustainability. Also listed as Economics C102.
(F) Sunding
 
Modeling and Management of Biological Resources  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C115 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture, one hour of discussion, and ad-hoc laboratories.
Prerequisites: Two semesters of calculus or consent of instructor.
Description: Models of population growth, chaos, life tables, and Leslie matrix theory. Harvesting and exploitation theory. Methods for analyzing population interactions, predation, competition. Fisheries, forest stands, and insect pest management. Genetic aspects of population management. Mathematical theory based on simple difference and ordinary differential equations. Use of simulation packages on microcomputers (previous experience with computers not required). Also listed as Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C104.
(F) Getz
 
Introductory Applied Econometrics  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C118 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Statistics 2 or equivalent.
Description: Formulation of a research hypothesis and definition of an empirical strategy. Regression analysis with cross-sectional and time-series data; econometric methods for the analysis of qualitative information; hypothesis testing. The techniques of statistical and econometric analysis are developed through applications to a set of case studies and real data in the fields of environmental, resource, and international development economics. Students learn the use of a statistical software for economic data analysis. Also listed as International and Area Studies C118.
(F) Sadoulet
 
Globalization and the Natural Environment  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 131 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Intermediate micro-economic theory or consent of instructor.
Description: An examination of the environmental effects of globalization. How has increased international trade, the integration of factor markets, and the adoption of international agreements affected the environment? Case studies include the environmental impact of GATT/WTO and NAFTA. Multi-disciplinary approach examines the actual laws and institutions and the economic theories of globalization, in addition to the empirical evidence of globalization's environmental effects.
(F) Karp
 
Economics of Race, Agriculture, and the Environment  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 140AC [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 1, or one lower division course in a social science, or consent of instructor.
Description: This course examines whether and how economic processes explain shifting formations of race and differential experiences among racial groups in U.S. agricultural and environmental systems. It approaches economic processes as organizing dynamics of racial differentiation and integration, and uses comparative experience among different racial and ethnic groups as sources of evidence against which economic theories of differentiation and integration can be tested.
(F) Romm
 
Industrial Organization with Applications to Agriculture and Natural Resources  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 142 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Environmental Economics and Policy 100 or Economics 100A or 101A.
Description: Organization and performance of agricultural and resource markets. Conduct of firms within those markets, such as price competition, product differentiation, predatory pricing, vertical integration, dealer networks and advertising. The role of public policy in the markets. Case studies include oil cartel OPEC, agricultural cooperatives, vertical integration of food processors and franchising of fast-food chains. Discussion sections cover empirical applications of theory presented during lectures for current environmental and agricultural policies.
(F,SP) Villas-Boas
 
Economics of Innovation and Intellectual Property  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 143 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 100 or Economics 100A or 101A.
Description: This course addresses the economics of research and incentives for innovation including intellectual property rights. Topics include the standard modern economics of invention; modern intellectual property rights; innovation examples from agriculture, energy, pharmaceuticals, software, and electronics; the roles of the public and private sectors; innovation and market structure; the needs of the poor; and global intellectual property negotiations.
(F) Wright
 
Health and Environmental Economic Policy  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 145 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomics, 100, Economics 100 or 101A, and some statistics.
Description: This course introduces students to key issues and findings in the field of health and environmental economics. The first half of the course focuses on the theoreticl and statistical frameworks used to analyze instances of market failure in the provision of health and environmental goods. The second half focuses on policy-relevant empirical findings in the field.
(F) Anderson
 
Regulation of Energy and the Environment  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 147 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomic theory and calculus.
Description: This is an applied economics course on government regulation of energy with an emphasis on policies that seek to mitigate the impact of energy production and consumption on the environment. The course is designed to help students make connections between economic concepts and real world regulatory policy questions and issues.
(SP) Fowlie
 
Economic Development  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C151 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Environmental Economics and Policy 100 or Economics 100A or 101A.
Description: Problems of underdevelopment and poverty, policy issues, and development strategy. Also listed as Economics C171.
(F) de Janvry
 
Advanced Topics in Development and International Trade  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 152 [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 100 or Economics 100A.
Description: This course discusses recent efforts to understand behavior and institutions in village economies, with particular attention paid to the importance of risk. Economic analysis of savings, consumption, insurance, production, trade, welfare distribution and institutions of villages in developing countries. Roughly equal parts of theory, evidence, and policy.
(F) Magruder
 
Population, Environment, and Development  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 153 [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomic theory or consent of instructor.
Description: This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to the complex interactions between population, environmental change, and economic development, including the leading theories for understanding these interactions. The origins and history of current debates are discussed as well as some of the major issues stemming from these debates, such as immigration, international trade, family planning policies and concerns over the global commons. Specific natural resources and services like fresh water, food supply, and forest cover are analyzed as case studies. Policy options for sustainable development are discussed.
(SP) Staff
 
Economics of Poverty and Technology  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 154 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomics.
Description: Introduction to the economic framework underlying the use of technology to address rural poverty in developing countries. Analyzes the path of technology development from innovation and design to the adoption and use of technology in rural economies. Focuses on technologies related to agricultural production, processing, market access, value chains, and climate change.
(SP) Boettiger
 
Advanced Topics in Environmental and Resource Economics  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 161 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 100 or Economics 100A or Economics 101A; 101 recommended.
Description: The roots of environmental and resource economics. Theories of land and resource rent. Models of optimal use of renewable and nonrenewable resources with applications to energy and timber. Balancing environmental and extractive values. Resources, growth, and sustainability. Special topic: the problem of global climate change.
(F)
 
Economics of Water Resources  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 162 [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 100 or Economics 100A or 101A; 101 recommended.
Description: Urban demand for water; water supply and economic growth; water utility economics; irrigation demand; large water projects; economic impacts of surface water law and institutions; economics of salinity and drainage; economics of groundwater management.
(SP)
 
The Economics of Climate Change  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C175 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: International and Area Studies 106, 107, Economics 1, or equivalent.
Description: The course will start with a brief introduction and evaluation of the scientific aspects behind climate change. Economic models will be developed to analyze the impacts of climate change and provide and critique existing and proposed policy tools. Specific topics studied are impacts on water resources and agriculture, economic evaluation of impacts, optimal control of greenhouse gases, benefit cost analysis, international treaty formation, discounting, uncertainty, irreversibility, and extreme events. Also listed as International and Area Studies C175.
(F,SP) Aufhammer, Fisher
 
Ecological Economics in Historical Context  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C180 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Economics 100A or equivalent.
Description: Economists through history have explored economic and environmental interactions, physical limits to growth, what constitutes the good life, and how economic justice can be assured. Yet economists continue to use measures and models that simplify these issues and promote bad outcomes. Ecological economics responds to this tension between the desire for simplicity and the multiple perspectives needed to understand complexity in order to move toward sustainable, fulfilling, just economies. Also listed as Energy and Resources Group C180.
(SP) Norgaard
 
International Trade  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C181 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Economics 100A-100B or Economics 101A-101B.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C181 after taking Undergraduate Business Administration 118.
Description: The theory of international trade and its applications to tariff protection. This course is equivalent to UGBA 118; students will not receive credit for both courses. Also listed as Economics C181.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Forest Ecosystem Management  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) C183 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Environmental Science, Policy, and Management 70, 102B or 171, 102C, and 185, or consent of instructor.
Description: Introduces students to concepts and quantitative tools needed for the sustainable management of multi-use forest ecosystems. Topics covered include: estimation of ecological, economic, and social values: construction of dynamic forest models, methods for optimal decision-making, and development of forest management plans. Application to current issues in temperate and tropical forest management are discussed. Quantitative, analytical, and communication skills are emphasized. Oral presentation required. Also listed as Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C183.
(SP) Potts
 
Senior Thesis  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 195 [4 units]
Course Format: Individual meetings with faculty sponsor.
Prerequisites: Senior standing in Environmental Economics and Policy and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Writing of a thesis under the direction of member(s) of the faculty. Subject must be approved by faculty sponsor.
(F,SP)
 
Senior Research Seminar  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 196 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of presentation and discussion of research projects per week.
Prerequisites: Student must be a senior with at least a 3.6 GPA in the Environmental Economics and Policy major.
Description: This course is intended as a capstone experience for undergraduates in the major coordinated by one faculty member with participation by others. Following presentations by faculty on researchable topics in their areas of expertise, students will develop ideas for a research paper and discuss in subsequent seminar sessions. Approximately the last five weeks of the semester will be devoted to student presentations of papers either already completed or in progress, and discussion by seminar participants and faculty.
(SP) Fisher
 
Honors Research  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) H196 [4 units]
Course Format: Individual research or meetings with faculty sponsor(s).
Prerequisites: Upper division standing. Eligibility restrictions related to GPA and unit accumulation. Open only to Environmental Economics and Policy majors in the College of Natural Resources.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Supervised independent honors research specific to aspects of environmental economics and policy, followed by a oral presentation and a written report.
(F,SP)
 
Field Study in Environmental Economics and Policy  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 197 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Independent study. Minimum of three hours of work per week per unit of credit.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised experience in off-campus organizations relevant to specific aspects of environmental economics and policy. Regular individual meetings with faculty sponsor and written reports required.
(F,SP)
 
Directed Group Studies for Advanced Undergraduates  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 198 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Meetings to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Group study of selected topic or topics in Environmental Economics and Policy.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  Environmental Economics and Policy  (ENVECON) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Independent meetings.
Prerequisites: Upper division standing and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Enrollment restrictions apply. Open to qualified upper division students wishing to pursue special study and directed research under the direction of a member of the staff.
(F,SP)
 
Foundations of the U.S. Air Force  --  Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) (AEROSPC) 1A [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Description: This course introduces students to the United States Air Force (USAF) and Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) with an overview of the basic characteristics, missions, and organization of the Air Force; additional topics include officership and professionalism, Air Force career opportunities, military customs and courtesies, and an introduction to USAF basic communication skills. Additionally, AFROTC cadets must attend weekly Leadership Lab. Leadership Lab is a weekly laboratory that touches on the topics of Air Force customs and courtesies, health and physical fitness, and drills and ceremonies.
(F,SP)
 
Foundations of the U.S. Air Force  --  Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) (AEROSPC) 1B [1 units]
Course Format: One and one-half hours of lecture/discussion per week.
Description: A survey course designed to introduce cadets to the U.S. Air Force and the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC). Featured topics include Air Force core values, leadership, team building, diversity, and communication skills. Additionally, AFROTC cadets must attend weekly Leadership Lab. Leadership Lab is a weekly laboratory that touches on the topics of Air Force customs and courtesies, health and physical fitness, and drills and ceremonies.
(F) Stone
 
The Evolution of U.S. Air Force Air and Space Power  --  Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) (AEROSPC) 2A [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Formerly 2
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course is designed to examine the general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. Utilizing this perspective, the course covers a time period from the first balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities (competencies) and missions (functions) to demonstrate the evolution of what has become today's air and space power.
(F)
 
The Evolution of U.S. Air Force Air and Space Power  --  Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) (AEROSPC) 2B [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Description: This course is designed to examine the general aspects of air and space power through a historical perspective. It examines several fundamental truths associated with war in the third dimension; e.g., principles of war and tenets of air and space power. As a whole, this course provides students with a knowledge level understanding for the element and employment of air and space power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective.
(SP)
 
Leadership Laboratory  --  Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) (AEROSPC) 100 
Course Format: Two hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: For Air Force cadets only.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Training session supports cadet classroom training. It consists of basic military knowledge and practical command and staff leadership experiences in preparation for active duty as military officers. This course focuses on the leadership experiences of senior cadets and provides training in basic military knowledge and skills to younger cadets. The main focus of this training is on proper uniform wear, grooming and appearance requirements, physical fitness, knowledge of the various military customs and courtesies, as well as a working knowledge of military drill and ceremony. This course is totally cadet-centered to maximize the leadership experience and prepare cadets to make an easy transition to their active duty assignments.
(F,SP)
 
Air Force Leadership Studies  --  Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) (AEROSPC) 135A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 135A is a prerequisite to 135B or consent of instructor.
Description: This course is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Lecture, text, case studies, and class discussion will be used to examine all aspects of leadership including counseling, mentoring, empowering, problem solving, accountability and authority. Students will develop upon basic written and oral communications skills primarily through written assignments and oral presentations.
(F)
 
Air Force Leadership Studies  --  Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC) (AEROSPC) 135B [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 135A or consent of instructor.
Description: This course is a study of leadership, management fundamentals, professional knowledge, and communication skills required of an Air Force junior officer. Lecture, text, case studies, and class discussion will be used to examine all aspects of leadership including counseling, mentoring, empowering, problem solving, accountability and authority. Students will develop upon basic written and oral communications skills primarily through written assignments and oral presentations.
(SP)
 
Freshman Composition  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) R1A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement.
Formerly 1A
Description: Training in expository, argumentative, and other styles of writing. The assignments will focus on themes and issues in African American life and culture. Satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Freshman Composition  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) R1B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and 1A.
Formerly 1B
Description: Continued training in expository and argumentative writing, with more emphasis on literary interpretation. Satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Africa: History and Culture  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 4A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: Emphasis on pre-colonial social, cultural, political, and economic structures; introduction to art, literature, oral traditions, and belief systems.
(F) Nwokeji
 
Africa: History and Culture  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 4B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: Emphasis on social, political, and economic change in 20th century Africa; with further emphasis upon the roles of modernization, urbanization, and the emergence of contemporary African states.
(F,SP) Nwokeji
 
African American Life and Culture in the United States  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 5A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: A study of the genesis, development, and scope of African American culture, approached through an examination of selected art forms, historical themes, and intellectual currents.
(F,SP) Allen
 
African American Life and Culture in the United States  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 5B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: Emphasis on the social experience of African Americans. An interdisciplinary approach designed to help students understand the forces and ideas that are influencing the individual and collective African American experience.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Elementary Wolof  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 7A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C7A/Linguistics C7A
Description: This course introduces students to speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Wolof. Instruction is mixed English and Wolof. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic Wolof structures and vocabulary in culturally and socially appropriate context. Speaking and listening abilities are developed through oral exercises, class discussions, and recordings available from Berkeley Language Center. Reading and writing are developed through in-class exercises, independent reading projects, and compositions. This course not open to native or heritage speakers of Wolof.
(F) Sow
 
Elementary Wolof  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 7B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: C7A.
Formerly C7B/Linguistics C7B
Description: This course introduces students to speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Wolof. Instruction is mixed English and Wolof. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic Wolof structures and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context. Speaking and listening abilities are developed through oral exercises, class discussions, and recordings available from the Berkeley Language Center. Reading and writing are developed through in-class exercises, independent reading projects, and compositions. For students with no college level Wolof completed with passing grade; this course is not open to native heritage speakers of Wolof.
(SP) Sow
 
Intermediate Wolof  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 8A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C8A/Linguistics C8A
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Wolof and appropriate cultural contexts of these structures in oral and written communication. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by instructor's materials.
(F) Sow
 
Intermediate Wolof  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 8B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: C8A.
Formerly C8B/Linguistics C8B
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Wolof, and appropriate cultural contexts of these structures in oral and written communication. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by the instructor's materials.
(SP) Sow
 
Advanced Wolof  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 9A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C9A/Linguistics C9A
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge from Intermediate Wolof. Oral and written communication will be presented in appropriate cultural contexts. Developing oral language skills will be strongly emphasized as part of this course and will be expanded through individual presentations, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing, grammar, vocabulary, and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by the instructor's materials.
(F) Sow
 
Advanced Wolof  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 9B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: C9A.
Formerly C9B/Linguistics C9B
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge from Intermediate Wolof. Oral and written communication will be presented in appropriate cultural contexts. Developing oral language skills will be strongly emphasized as part of this course and will be expanded through individual presentations, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing, grammar, vocabulary and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by the instructor's materials.
(SP) Sow
 
Intermediate Swahili  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 10A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C10A/Linguistics C10A
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C10A after taking Linguistics 10A.
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Swahili and appropriate cultural contexts of these structures in oral and written communication. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings available at Berkeley Language Center. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by instructor's materials.
(F) Jibril
 
Intermediate Swahili  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 10B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: C10A.
Formerly C10B/Linguistics C10B
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C11B after taking Linguistics 1B.
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Swahili and appropriate cultural contexts of these structures in oral and written communication. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by instructor's materials.
(SP) Jibril
 
Elementary Swahili  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 11A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course introduces students to the basics of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Swahili. Instruction is mixed English and Swahili. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic structures and vocabulary in culturally and socially appropriate context. Speaking and listening abilities are developed through oral exercises, class discussions, and recordings available from Berkeley Language Center. Reading and writing are developed through in-class exercises, independent reading projects, and compositions. This course not open to native or heritage speakers of Swahili.
(F,SP) Mchombo
 
Elementary Swahili  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 11B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: C11A.
Formerly C11B/Linguistics C1B
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C11B after taking Linguistics 1B.
Description: This course introduces students to the basics of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Swahili. Instruction is mixed English and Swahili. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic structures and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context. Speaking and listening abilities are developed through oral exercises, class discussions, and recordings available from Berkeley Language Center. Reading and writing are developed through in-class exercises, independent reading projects, and compositions. This course not open to native or heritage speakers of Swahili.
(SP) Mchombo
 
Elementary Zulu  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 13A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C13A/Linguistics C3A
Description: This course introduces students to speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Zulu. Instruction is mixed English and Zulu. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic Zulu structures and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context. Speaking and listening abilities are developed through oral exercises, class discussions, and recordings available from Berkeley Language Center. Reading and writing are developed through in-class exercise, independent reading projects, and compositions. This course not open to native or heritage speakers of Zulu.
(F) Sibanda
 
Elementary Zulu  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 13B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: C13A.
Formerly C13B/Linguistics C3B
Description: This course introduces students to speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Zulu. Instruction is mixed English and Zulu. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic Zulu structures and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context. Speaking and listening abilities are developed through oral exercises, class discussions, and recordings available from Berkeley Language Center. Reading and writing are developed through in-class exercises, independent reading projects, and compositions. This course not open to native or heritage speakers of Zulu.
(SP) Sibanda
 
Intermediate Zulu  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 14A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C14A/Linguistics C4A
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Zulu. Oral and written communication is emphasized. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by instructor's materials.
(F) Sibanda
 
Intermediate Zulu  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 14B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C14B/Linguistics C4B
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Zulu. Oral and written communication is emphasized. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by instructor's materials.
(SP) Sibanda
 
Advanced Swahili  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 15A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C15A/Linguistics C15A
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge from Intermediate Swahili. Oral and written communication will be presented in appropriate cultural contexts. Developing oral language skills will be strongly emphasized as part of this course and will be expanded through individual presentations, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing, grammar, vocabulary and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by instructor's materials.
(F) Mchombo
 
Advanced Swahili  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 15B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of recitation and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Elementary Swahili C1A-C1B; Intermediate Swahili C10A-C10B; Advanced Swahili C15A.
Formerly C15B/Linguistics C15B
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge from Intermediate Swahili. Developing oral language skills will be strongly emphasized as part of this course and will be expanded through individual presentations, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing, grammar, vocabulary, and reading are expanded through compositions, research projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection, and supplemented by instructor's materials.
(SP) Mchombo
 
Advanced Zulu  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 19A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C19A/Linguistics C19A
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge from Intermediate Zulu. Oral and written communication will be presented in appropriate cultural contexts. Developing oral language skills will be strongly emphasized as part of this course and will be expanded through individual presentations, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing, grammar, vocabulary, and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by instructor's materials.
(F) Sibanda
 
Advanced Zulu  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 19B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: C19A.
Formerly C19B/Linguistics C19B
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge from Intermediate Zulu. Oral and written communication will be presented in appropriate cultural contexts. Developing oral language skills will be strongly emphasized as part of this course and will be expanded through individual presentations, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing, grammar, vocabulary, and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by the instructor's materials.
(SP) Sibanda
 
Freshman Seminars  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 24 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.
(F,SP)
 
Lives of Struggle: Minorities in a Majority Culture  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 27AC [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The purpose of this course is to examine the many forms that the struggle of minorities can assume. The focus is on individual struggle and its outcome as reported and perceived by the individuals themselves. Members of three minority aggregates are considered: African Americans, Asian Americans (so called), and Chicano/Latino Americans. The choice of these three has to do with the different histories of members of these aggregrates. Such differences have produced somewhat different approaches to struggle.
(F) Hintzen
 
Globalization and Minority American Communities  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 28AC [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: An examination of the movement of individuals, ideas, ideologies, and institutions between minority American communities in the U.S. (African Americans, Asians, Chicanos) and their cultures of origin, in the 19th and 20th centuries. The course will utilize the concepts of "migration," "diaspora," "otherness," "multiculturalism," and "global village" and will draw largely on social science perspectives.
(SP) Small
 
Elementary Chichewa  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 30A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C30A/Linguistics C30A
Description: This course introduces students to speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Chichewa. Instruction is mixed English and Chichewa. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic Chichewa structures and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context. Speaking and listening abilities are developed through oral exercises, class discussions, and recordings available from Berkeley Language Center. Reading and writing are developed through in-class exercises, independent reading projects, and compositions. This course is not open to native or heritage speakers of Chichewa.
(F) Mchombo
 
Elementary Chichewa  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 30B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: C19A.
Formerly C30B/Linguistics C30B
Description: This course introduces students to speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Chichewa. Instruction is mixed English and Chichewa. Emphasis is placed on developing student ability to create and to communicate with basic Chichewa structures and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context. Speaking and listening abilities are developed through oral exercises, class discussions, and recordings available from Berkeley Language Center. Reading and writing are developed through in-class exercises, independent reading projects, and compositions. This course is not open to native or hertiage speakers of Chichewa.
(SP) Mchombo
 
Intermediate Chichewa  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 31A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Formerly C31A/Linguistics C31A
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Chichewa and appropriate cultural contexts of these structures in oral and written communication. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by the instructor's materials.
(F) Mchombo
 
Intermediate Chichewa  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 31B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: C31A.
Formerly C31B/Linguistics C31B
Description: This course reviews and expands students' knowledge of fundamental structures from Elementary Chichewa and appropriate cultural contexts of these structures in oral and written communication. More grammar and vocabulary in a culturally and socially appropriate context is developed. Speaking ability is expanded through oral exercises, individual reports, class discussions, and recordings available at the Berkeley Language Center. Writing and reading are expanded through compositions, written exercises, and independent reading projects with texts available through Berkeley's African Library Collection and supplemented by the instructor's materials.
(SP) Mchombo
 
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 39 
Course Format: Seminar format.
Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sophomores.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Freshman/Sophmore Seminar  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 39B [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Freshman/Sophmore Seminar  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 39D [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Freshman/Sophmore Seminar  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 39E [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Freshman/Sophmore Seminar  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 39F [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Freshman/Sophmore Seminar  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 39G [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Sophomore Seminar  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 84 [1,2 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks. Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five weeks.
Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-grade basis.
Description: Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.
(F,SP)
 
Directed Group Studies for Freshmen and Sophomores  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 98 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Supervised research.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised research on specific topics related to African American Studies.
(F,SP)
 
Berkeley Connect  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 98BC [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Independent Studies for Freshmen and Sophomores  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 99 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of independent study per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised research on specific topics related to African American Studies.
(F,SP)
 
Black Intellectual Thought  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 100 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement.
Description: This course, lets students explore the status of African American studies as a discipline. The class will discuss the social relevance of African American studies, the political origins of the discipline, and the debate over Afrocentricity. Special attention will be devoted to the contributions of black feminist theory and community scholars/organic intellectuals to the development of the discipline.
(F,SP) Raiford
 
Research Methods for African American Studies  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 101 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Introductory statistics.
Description: As an introduction to interdisciplinary research methods as they are applied to the study of African American communities, the course will examine theoretical and conceptual issues; techniques for identifying existing research; and sources and methods of social research and data collection. The main focus will be on qualitative methods.
 
Race and Public Policy  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 107 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course examines the formation and implementation of public policies directly relevant to the black community. While the policies analyzed differ from year to year, basic public policy methodology will be introduced each year.
Henry
 
Black and Male in American Life  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 109 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Upper division status.
Description: The course examines ways gender and race constructions shape the lives of African American males. Developmental in design, we examine black males in the context of childhood, adolescence, gender relations and family, and the world of work.
(SP) Staff
 
Race, Class, and Gender in the United States  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 111 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement.
Description: Emphasis on social history and comparative analysis of race, class, and gender relations in American society. Examines both similarities and differences, and highlights gender politics.
(F,SP)
 
Political and Economic Development in the Third World  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 112A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per week.
Description: An examination of the structural and actual manifestations of Third World underdevelopment and the broad spectrum of theoretical positions put forward to explain it. Underdevelopment will be viewed from both the international and intranational perspective.
(F) Hintzen
 
Political and Economic Development in the Third World  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 112B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: A critical appraisal of the theoretically based policies employed by Third World nations in their attempts at transition to modernized developed socio-political and economic systems and an examination of the international and intranational impediments to Third World development. The focus will be on actual examples that represent the diversity of developing countries.
(SP) Hintzen
 
Linguistic Structure of Bantu Languages  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 114 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Equivalent of Linguistics 5 (Language and Linguistics) or consent of instructor.
Description: The objective of this course is to examine the major syntactic structures of Bantu languages with comments on the contributions made by African linguistics to general linguistics. Chichewa, also known as Chinyanja, a language spoken in east, central, and southern Africa, as well as Swahili, the major language of East Africa, and Ndebele or Zulu, languages of southern Africa, will constitute the main case studies. Data from those and other languages will be brought in to illustrate relevant aspects of Bantu linguistic structure.
(F,SP) Mchombo
 
Language and Social Issues in Africa  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 115 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This is an upper division course dealing with the relevance of language to social issues in African societies. It will focus on political developments in Africa and the use of language in fostering national identity; attaining cultural emancipation; and as a tool of oppression, of maintenance of social relations, and of addressing issues of education and childhood development, etc. The course will examine such issues as the roots of national language policies as influenced by Africa's reaction to colonialism; the role of western languages in African society and the attitudes towards African languages and cultures; the challenges of nation-building in modern African states; the use of African languages in government, education, and technology; the role of language in dealing with the HIV/AIDS pandemic, and other health issues; minority languages, endangered languages, and language preservation; cultural responses to migration and African diaspora: the use of African languages in the age of globalization and information technology.
(F,SP) Mchombo
 
Slavery and African American Life Before 1865  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 116 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: This course will examine the origins of the African slave trade, and explore political, economic, demographic and cultural factors shaping African American life and culture prior to 1865.
(F,SP) Taylor
 
African Americans in the Industrial Age, 1865-1970  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 117 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: With emphasis given to the organization of labor after slavery, this course will explore the history of African American cultural, institutions and protest traditions from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Movement.
(SP) Taylor
 
The Slave Trade and Culture in the Modern Atlantic World  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 118 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: The course explores the role of the transatlantic slave trade in the evolution of the Atlantic world, comprising four continents: Africa, Europe, and North and South America. Although the course will deal with various aspects of the slave trade, it will emphasize cultural themes. The discovery of fresh data and the application of more sophisticated techniques have in recent years combined with a growing willingness of specialists to speak to a wider audience and to wider social implications.
(F,SP) Nwokeji
 
Selected Topics in the Sociohistorical Development of the Black World  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 119 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Determined by offering.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics will vary each semester.
(F,SP)
 
Black Political Life in the United States  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 121 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 5B or 116 and 117 or History 125A-125B.
Description: Analysis of the theoretical and historical development of African Americans' political forms and expression. Examination of local, state, and federal political processes and activities, and the development of black political ideologies, organizations, and movements.
Henry
 
African American Families in American Society  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 122 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 5B or introductory course in sociology.
Description: Examines the historical roles and functions of families in the development of black people in America from slavery to the present.
 
Social and Political Thought in the Diaspora  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 123 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: An examination of social and political thought of Africans traveling across the Diaspora, with particular focus on the 19th and 20th centuries.
(F,SP) Small
 
History of the Civil Rights Movement  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 125 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The objective of this course is to examine the modern civil rights movement. As understood traditionally, this period began with the United States Supreme Court decision of May 17, 1954, Brown vs. Board of Education, until the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This course will seek to place this movement in the context of global developments and in the context of the broad sweep of United States history. Assigned readings consist of historical texts and autobiographies. Lectures will place the readings in context, discussing the material and its significance in the overall history and culture of African Americans. Visual and musical media will augment the class lectures.
(F,SP) Taylor
 
African American Women's History  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 126 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The objective of this course is to examine substantive issues in the African American female experience from colonial times to the present. The dominant themes of this course include family, work, community, sexuality, and individual and collective activism. Particular attention will be paid to the interplay between race, class, and gender in American society. Assigned readings consist of an introduction to the scholarly secondary literature on African American women's history. Lectures and discussions will examine the readings in context. Videos will augment the lectures and discussions.
(F) Taylor
 
Caribbean Societies and Cultures  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 131 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Comparative study of Spanish, Dutch, English, and French-speaking Caribbean societies. Analysis of Caribbean social structure including the development of the plantation system, urban dynamics, ethnic politics, family structures, and ecology of African Caribbean religions.
(SP) Laguerre
 
Race, Identity, and Culture in Urban Schools  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C133A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar/discussion per week.
Description: This course will focus on understanding urban schools as a part of a broader system of social stratification and the process by which students in urban schools come to a sense of themselves as students, as members of cultural and racial groups, and as young people in America. Topics include racial identity; race/ethnicity in schools; urban neighborhood congtexts; and schooling in the juvenile justice system. Students will also integrate course readings with their own first-hand experience working in one of several off-campus sites. This course has a mandatory community engagement component for which students will earn 1 unit of field study (197) credit. Also listed as Education C181.
(SP) Suad-Bakari
 
Information Technology and Society  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 134 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course assesses the role of information technology in the digitalization of society by focusing on the deployment of e-government, e-commerce, e-learning, the digital city, telecommuting, virtual communities, Internet time, the virtual office, and the geography of cyberspace. Course will also discuss the role of information technology in the governance and economic development of society.
(F,SP) Laguerre
 
Information Technology and Society  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C134 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C134 after taking 134.
Description: This course assesses the role of information technology in the digitalization of society by focusing on the deployment of e-government, e-commerce, e-learning, the digital city, telecommuting, virtual communities, internet time, the virtual office, and the geography of cyber space. The course will also discuss the role of information technology in the governance and economic development of society. Also listed as American Studies C134.
(F,SP) Laguerre
 
Multicultural Communities  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 137 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: Examination of theoretical issues in urban anthropology and sociology pertaining to the United States as a multicultural society. Comparative analysis of the ecology and social structure of African American, Native American, Asian American, Mexican American and Afro-Caribbean urban communities with special emphasis on social class, ethnicity, and culture.
(SP) Laguerre
 
Black Nationalism  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 138 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 5B.
Description: Examines the concept of black nationalism and its historical and intellectual development. Special attention will be given to the role of African American religion and the attempt to develop "black socialism."
(F,SP) Henry
 
Selected Topics of African American Social Organization and Institutions  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 139 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Determined by offering.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics will vary each semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in Cultural Studies  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 140 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Determined by offering.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics will vary each semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Third World Cinema  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 142A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture, plus two hours of viewing/discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement.
Description: Examines through lectures and a selection of films, the development and achievements of Third World motion picture artistry. Social, political, and cultural themes are discussed, with particular emphasis given to major works from Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Other newly developed film sources from abroad are presented for critical assessment.
(F)
 
Race and American Film  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 142AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and two hours of viewing/discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement satisfied.
Description: This course uses film to investigate the central role of race in American culture and history. Using films as the primary texts, the course will explore the relationship between these films and the social and political contexts from which they emerged. Looking at both mainstream and independent cinema, the course will chart the continuities and varieties of representations and negotiations of "race." The course spans the 20th century, covering (among other topics) Jim Crow in silent film, Hollywood westerns and melodramas, borderland crime dramas, documentary film, and experimental cinema. This class will concentrate on the history of African Americans in film, but we will also watch movies that consider how the overlapping histories of whiteness and ethnicity, American Indians, Asian Americans, Mexican Americans, the "Third World" and "multiculturalism" have been represented in film. Themes covered include representing race and nation; the borderlands; passing and miscegenation; the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality.
(F,SP) Raiford
 
Performance: An African American Perspective  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C143A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: African American Studies 1A or consent of instructor recommended.
Description: Introduction to the Research-to Performance Method, African American aesthetics and dramatic performance techniques. Course will survey wide range of writings on performance and investigate applications through exercises and improvisations. Students will also assist in information gathering for works in progress. Also listed as Theater, Dance, and Performance St C183A.
 
Research-to-Performance Laboratory  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C143B [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: African American Studies 143A or consent of instructor recommended.
Description: Development of scholarly material for theatrical presentation and enhancement of dramatic performance techniques through discussions, improvisations and readings of work conceived by the class and/or writers in other African American Studies courses. All source material will be based on the research of scholars in the field of African American Studies. Also listed as Theater, Dance, and Performance St C183B.
 
Black Theatre Workshop  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C143C [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: African American Studies C143A or consent of instructor recommended.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Students will receive no credit for Africam American Studies C143C/Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies C183C after taking Dramatic Art C183C.
Description: Study and production of a play by an African American writer. The play will be studied within its social and historical context. Students will be introduced to the various aspects of theatre production. Also listed as Theater, Dance, and Performance St C183C.
 
Introduction to Cultural Studies: Black Visual Culture  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 144 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement.
Description: This course examines theories of culture and contemporary issues in popular culture. The course focuses on the instrumentality of culture as a vehicle of domination and resistance. The goal of the course is to provide the student with a critical vocabulary for cultural analysis. Key issues to be examined are ideology, hegemony, articulation, race and gender formation. Students must have a willingness to engage new and difficult ideas.
(F,SP) Raiford
 
African American Literature 1920 to Present  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 150B [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Survey of African American literature from the Harlem Renaissance to the present. A close analysis of major writers, premises.
(F,SP) Scott
 
Contemporary African American Drama  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C151B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: African American Studies C151A or consent of instructor recommended.
Description: Survey of contemporary plays by African American writers and the portrayal of the black experience in American theatre. Emphasis on predominant themes, structural tendencies, socio-historical context. Also listed as Theater, Dance, and Performance St C131B.
(SP)
 
Neo-Slave Narratives  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 152F [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course explores African American fiction written during the 1970s and 1980s that attempt to re-present the ur-text of African American literature--and/or to represent for contemporary readers the lives of African slaves in the United States. In what ways do these authors imagine the experience and effects of slavery from their vantage point a century after emancipation, and with the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements shaping the context of their writing?
(F,SP) Scott, D.
 
Novels of Toni Morrison  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 153C [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Satisfaction of the Reading and Composition requirement.
Description: We will closely read seven of Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison's novels, as well as a short story and some of her essays, considering the works in relation to: her interest in creating what she calls "village literature" and in writing literature that does "trope work" that intervenes in American representations of blackness and racial identity; her contributions to the renaissance of black women's writing (and African American literature in general) in the 1980s and 1990s.
(F,SP) Scott, D.
 
Literature of the Caribbean: Significant Themes  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 155 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement.
Description: An introduction to representative works, themes, and discourses in Caribbean literatures--produced by authors from the Anglophone, Creolophone, Francophone, and Hispanophone areas within Plantation America. Includes examinations of indigenous folkways and nation languages as sources for a re-examination of Caribbean culture and literary history.
(F) Clark
 
Poetry for the People: Introduction to the Art of Poetry  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 156AC [4 units]
Course Format: Two to three hours of lecture and one to two hours of discussion per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: A large lecture/discussion class which introduces students to poetry as culture, history, criticism, politics, and practice. Focusing comparatively on poetry from three American racial/ethnic groups, this course requires students to learn both the technical structure of various forms of poetry as well as the world views which inform specific poetic traditions. The groups and traditions vary from semester to semester. This course satisfies the Arts and Literature breadth requirement.
(F,SP)
 
Creative Writing  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 157 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 units.
Description: Provides intensive study of the craft of writing in relation to the various genres. Course changes frequently by focus upon a specific genre.
Jordan
 
Poetry for the People: The Writing and Teaching of Poetry  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 158A [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of seminar per week, plus community workshop teaching.
Prerequisites: 156AC plus consent of instructor.
Description: The focus of this course is on the writing of poetry, and students undertake an intensive study of both the techniques of poetry and the social and cultural context of specific poetic traditions. Students must "imitate" the poems they study, write critical papers comparing poetic traditions, and complete an original manuscript of new poems. In addition, they must produce an on-campus poetry reading and are required to teach for five to seven weeks at one of the assigned Poetry for the People venues. This course satisfies the Arts and Literature breadth requirement.
(F)
 
Poetry for the People: Practicum  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 158B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of seminar, plus peer teaching and performance.
Prerequisites: 158A.
Description: A teaching practicum, with the regular and active supervision of the instructor, for students who completed 156AC during the previous year and 158A in the previous fall. They serve as student teacher poets for 156AC. The focus of 158B is on the teaching of poetry. Each student poet is responsible for a group of seven to ten students, and, under the direct supervision of the instructor, helps the students in his/her group learn to read, criticize, and produce poetry.
(SP)
 
Special Topics in African American Literature  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 159 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement, plus those set by instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special topics in African American literature.
(F,SP)
 
Gandhi and the Civil Rights Movement in America  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 173AC [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course surveys the impact of Gandhi's philosophy of nonviolence and justice in American Civil Rights struggles. Through narratives, images from African American, itinerant Gandhian, and ethnic critics of race practice in American culture, we examine how Gandhian satyagraha shaped emergent civil resistance movements, as also the global appeal to nonviolent democracy. ACES component comprises internship with civil liberties partners that monitor local implementations of human rights treaties. Also listed as Religious Studies 173AC.
(SP) Bilimoria
 
Cultural Studies  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C178 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/discussion per week.
Description: Although the Caribbean has been recognized in recent years as being one of the most compelling areas in regard to questions of interculturality, hybridity, and miscegenation, the Dutch-speaking part of it has somehow been neglected. This course intends to give an opportunity to those who do not necessarily have a command of Dutch language, but wish to complete their knowledge of Latin-American and Carribean history, culture, and literature. Also listed as Spanish C178 and Dutch C178.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Advanced Seminar in African Diaspora Studies  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 190AC [3-4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: For a four-unit course, an extra assignment/research component will be added to the course to increase contact hours with students. Possible components include additional readings, outside of class reserach projects and other projects which the instructor feels will add to the value of course. Topics to be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Senior Honors Thesis  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) H195A [3 units]
Course Format: Regular individual meetings with faculty sponsor.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and 3.5 GPA overall and in major.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence.
Description: The student will complete a primary research and writing project based on study of an advanced topic with faculty sponsor. Fulfills department thesis requirement. Application and details at departmental adviser's office. Students must enroll for both semesters of the sequence.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Senior Honors Thesis  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) H195B [3 units]
Course Format: Regular individual meetings with faculty sponsor.
Prerequisites: Senior standing and 3.5 GPA overall and in major.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence.
Description: The student will complete a primary research and writing project based on study of an advanced topic with faculty sponsor. Fulfills department thesis requirement. Application and details at departmental adviser's office. Students must enroll for both semesters of the sequence.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Field Study in African American Life  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 197 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised field work in off-campus organizations. Regular individual meetings with faculty sponsor and written reports required. Independent study form available in department office.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Directed Group Studies for Undergraduates  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 198 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. EEnrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised research on a specific topic.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Berkeley Connect  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 198BC [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Forms for independent study are available in the department office.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Interdisciplinary Research Methods  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 201A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This seminar will provide a detailed introduction and working knowledge of the various methodological techniques appropriate for interdisciplinary research on the African Diaspora.
 
Qualitative Research Methods for African American Studies  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 201B [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of seminar per week.
Description: A review of competing epistemologies in qualitative research of African Americans.
(SP) Small
 
Theories of the African Diaspora  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 201D [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course is intended to provide students with an initial background for the composition of the position paper discussing the concept and study of African Diaspora necessary for passing department qualifying exams. It will introduce some of the theoretical frameworks for, and approaches to, scholarship concerning the African Diaspora.
(F,SP) Scott
 
Special Topics in Cultural Studies of the Diaspora  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 240 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: One hour of lecture per week per unit. Topics will vary from term to term depending on student demand and faculty availability.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in Development Studies of the Diaspora  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 241 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week.
Description: One hour of lecture per week per unit. Topics will vary from term to term depending on student demand and faculty availability.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in African Linguistics  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 242 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics will vary to suit student demand or interest. The seminar will require solid grounding in linguistic theory.
(F,SP) Mchombo
 
Black Intellectuals: Social and Cultural Roles  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 250 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: The course will examine the development of an intellectual group in African American life from the 18th century to the present. Implicit in the examination is consideration of the social and cultural roles, writers, scholars, artists, and other thinkers have played in American and African American culture.
(SP) Staff
 
Diaspora, Citizenship, and Transnationality  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 256B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This seminar analyzes the social construction and reproduction of diasporic communities in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. It examines the relations of the diaspora to the homeland in the context of the globalization process. The role of transnational migration and deterritorialization in the production of bipolar, fragmented, and multiple identities will be analyzed. Postnational models of citizenship--differentiated, transnational, and multicultural--will be assessed in light of poststructuralist theories.
(SP) Laguerre
 
Identity Politics in the Caribbean and Africa  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 257A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: An exhaustive examination of the conditions under which identity constructs (race, ethnicity, nation, religion, language, region, etc.) come to occupy the symbolic center in the organization of mass political movements in non-industrialized Third World societies. The course will be comparative in scope using case histories from Africa and the Caribbean. It will focus on the relationship between the "politics of identity," national economic decision making, and the distribution of economic, social, cultural, and symbolic capital.
(SP) Hintzen
 
Power, Domination, and Ideology  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 257B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This course will focus on theories and realities of power, domination, and ideology as they pertain to issues of identity in the post-World War II political economies of Africa and the African diaspora.
Hintzen
 
Black Feminist Criticism  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 262 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This course will focus on the development of a black feminist criticism(s). We will be specifically concerned with the writings of significant black women critics of the 19th and 20th centuries who have used intersections of class, race, and gender to analyze major issues of their time.
(SP)
 
Research Advances in Race, Diversity, and Educational Policy  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C265 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This introductory graduate seminar will engage the research literature on race, diversity, and educational policy to provide a foundation for examining contemporary issues in American public schooling. We will examine research on race, culture, and learning alongside more policy driven research on school structures, governance, finance, politics, and policy. In doing so, we will blend micro level examinations of teaching and learning with macro level considerations of politics and policy. Also listed as Education C265C.
(SP) Nasir, Perry, Scott,J.
 
The Education of African-American Students  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C286 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Undergraduates may enroll with consent of instructor.
Description: This seminar will examine a wide range of perspectives on the education of African American children and adolescents in the United States. Readings will support students in understanding some of the key issues and tensions in African American education and school achievement, including the roles that culture, identity, parents, families, and communities play in the education and schooling of African American students; systemic issues in educational improvement and the perpetuation of "achievement gaps"; and language and power. Also listed as Education C286.
(SP) Suad-Bakari
 
Directed Dissertation Research  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 296 [1-13 units]
Course Format: One to eight hours of independent study per week.
Prerequisites: Advancement to Ph.D. candidacy.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Open to qualified students who have been advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree and are directly engaged in doctoral dissertation research.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Master's Examination Preparation Course  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 298 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of seminar per week.
Description: This class is designed to prepare second year graduate students for the spring Master's Examination in African Diaspora Studies. Basing our syllabus upon the established reading list, we will meet weekly to discuss individual texts, methods of interpreting and critiquing works across disciplines, strategies for reading, studying, and ultimately taking the exam itself.
(SP) Staff
 
Individual Study or Research  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 299 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of independent study per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Individual study or research program to be worked out with sponsoring faculty before approval by department chair. Regular meetings arranged with faculty sponsor.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Critical Pedagogy: Instructor Training  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) C375 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar and two hours of practicum per week.
Description: The seminar provides a systemic approach to theories and practices of critical pedagogy at the university level. Examines the arts of teaching and learning and current disciplinary and cross-disciplinary issues in African/diaspora and Ethnic Studies. Participation two hours per week as practicum in 39, "Introduction to the University: African American Perspectives" is mandatory. The course is required for students expecting to serve as graduate student instructors in the department. Also listed as Ethnic Studies Graduate Group C375.
(F) Clark, Wong
 
Individual Study for Doctoral Students  --  African American Studies  (AFRICAM) 602 [2-12 units]
Course Format: Individual conferences.
Prerequisites: 201A-201B.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Individual study, in consultation with group faculty, to prepare students for the doctoral oral examinations. A student will be permitted to accumulate a maximum of 8 units toward examination preparation. Units earned in this course may not be used to meet academic residence or unit requirements for the master's or doctoral degree.
(F,SP)
 
Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology Interdisciplinary Seminar  --  Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology  (AHMA) 210 [2,4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Team-taught by faculty from two different departments. The purpose is not only to expose students to a discipline other than their own, but to engage them directly in the application of that discipline to their own research interests. The topic and instructors will vary from year to year.
Staff
 
Special Study  --  Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology  (AHMA) 299 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of independent study per week per unit, including consultation.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics and instructors will vary from year to year. Special individual study for qualified graduate students. Individual study and research, including archaeological fieldwork or laboratory projects, in consultation with instructor on subject matter not covered in scheduled course offerings.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to American Studies  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 10 [4 units]
Course Format: Three to four hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Formerly Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Studies 10
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for American Studies 10 after completing American Studies 10AC. A deficient grade in American Studies 10 may be removed by taking American Studies 10AC.
Description: American culture and cultural change, with attention to the multicultural basis of American society and emphasis on the need for multiple methods of analysis. The course will consistently draw on the arts, material culture, and various fields affecting cultural production and meaning. Those areas include literature, film, history, architecture, history of art, religion, music, engineering, environmental studies, anthropology, politics, economics, law, and medicine. This course may include discussion sections depending on available funding. Some versions of this course need four in-class contact hours because of the extensive use of media.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to American Studies: Hollywood: the Place, the Industry, the Fantasy  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C10 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for American Studies C10/Letters and Science C40T after taking Letters and Science 40C.
Description: This course will introduce students to the interdisciplinary field of American Studies, taking the "Hollywood Dream Factory" as the central theme. Focusing on both parts of that phrase, the course will proceed along a double path. We will examine the historical and geographical development of the motion picture industry from the rise of the studio system to the "new" entertainment economy of the 1980's and we will examine ways Hollywood is represented in literature and film. Also listed as Letters and Science C40T.
(F,SP) Moran
 
Introduction to American Studies  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 10AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 10AC after taking 10 or Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies 10. A deficient grade in American Studies 10 or Interdisciplinary Studies 10 may be removed by taking American Studies 10AC.
Description: American culture and cultural change, with attention to the multicultural basis of American society and emphasis on the need for multiple methods of analysis. The course will consistently draw on the arts, material culture, and various fields affecting cultural production and meaning. Those areas include literature, film, history, architecture, history of art, religion, music, engineering, environmental studies, anthropology, politics, economics, law, and medicine.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Freshman Seminar  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 24 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen.
(F,SP)
 
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 39 
Course Format: Two to four hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25.
(F,SP)
 
Directed Group Study  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 98 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Group meetings to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Open only to freshmen and sophomores. Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Written proposal must be approved by sponsoring faculty. Seminars for the group study of selected topics, which will vary from year to year. Topics may be initiated by students.
Staff
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 99 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Restricted to freshmen and sophomores; consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Independent study and research by arrangement with faculty.
Staff
 
Examining U.S. Cultures in Time  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 101 [4 units]
Course Format: Three to four hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: This course examines how U.S. cultures are constructed, reinforced, and changed, and how those cultures act simultaneously at a given time. To help students develop skills in cultural analysis, lectures will contrast various methods and perspectives as they apply to the study of a particular year or decade. Topics will vary from semester to semester. This course may include discussion sections depending on available funding. Some versions of this course need four in-class contact hours because of the extensive use of media.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Examining U.S. Cultures in Time  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 101AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three to four hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: This course examines how U.S. cultures are constructed, reinforced, and changed, and how those cultures act simultaneously at a given time. To help students develop skills in cultural analysis, lectures will contrast various methods and perspectives as they apply to the study of a particular year or decade. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Examining U.S. Cultures in Place  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 102 [4 units]
Course Format: Three to four hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: This course examines how U.S. cultures are constructed, reinforced, and changed--particularly in reference to place and material culture. Qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis drawn from several disciplines will help students develop skills in cultural interpretation. Case studies may focus on a neighborhood, a city, or a region. Topics will vary from semester to semester. This course may include discussion sections depending on available funding. Some versions of this course need four in-class contact hours because of the extensive use of media.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in American Studies  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 110 [3,4 units]
Course Format: Three to four hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: This course is designed primarily to allow faculty to develop focused interdisciplinary courses which address specific issues, themes, or problems in American society. Topics vary from semester to semester. Students should consult the department's webpage for current offerings before the start of the semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Honors Seminar: Special Topics in American Studies  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) H110 [3 units]
Course Format: Three to four hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor may be required.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: This course is designed to introduce honors students (those who have achieved a minimum overall GPA of 3.3) to the history and theory of American studies as an interdisciplinary field and to explore current themes, debates, and researh problems in American studies.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in American Studies--American Cultures  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 110AC [3,4 units]
Course Format: Three or four hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: This course is designed primarily to allow faculty to develop focused interdisciplinary courses that address specific issues, themes, or problems in American society and American cultures. Topics vary from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Architecture in Depression and War  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C111A [4 units]
Course Format: Three to four hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: The Great Depression and World War II are arguably the two most influential events for the development of the built environment in the 20th century. Not only did they alter the socio-economic and political landscape on which architecture and urban planning depend, but they also led to technological innovations and vital debates about the built environment. This course examines the 1930's and 1940's topically, studying the work of the New Deal, corporate responses to the Depression and war, the important connections between architecture and advertising, the role of the Museum of Modern Art in the promotion of Modernism, the concept of the ideal house, and key tests, theories, and projects from the period. Also listed as Architecture C174.
(SP) Shanken
 
Topics in American Studies  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C111E [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly C136
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit with different topic and consent of instructor.
Description: A course on the intellectual, cultural, historical, and social backgrounds to American literature. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Students should consult the department's "Announcement of Classes" for current offerings well before the start of the semester. Also listed as English C136.
 
American Cultural Landscapes, 1600 to 1900  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C112A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Formerly C169A
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Environmental Design C169A/American Studies C112A/Geography C160A after taking Environmental Design 169A/American Studies 169A/Geography 160A.
Description: Introduces ways of seeing and interpreting American histories and cultures, as revealed in everyday built surroundings-- houses, highways, farms, factories, stores, recreation areas, small towns, city districts, and regions. Encourages students to read landscapes as records of past and present social relations and to speculate for themselves about cultural meaning. Also listed as Environmental Design C169A and Geography C160A.
(F) Groth
 
American Cultural Landscapes, 1900 to Present  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C112B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Formerly C169B
Description: Introduces ways of seeing and interpreting American histories and cultures, as revealed in everyday built surroundings--homes, highways, farms, factories, stores, recreation areas, small towns, city districts, and regions. Encourages students to read landscapes as records of past and present social relations, and to speculate for themselves about cultural meaning. Also listed as Environmental Design C169B and Geography C160B.
(SP) Groth
 
The American Forest: Its Ecology, History, and Representation  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C112F [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Formerly C176
Description: The American forest will be examined in terms of its ecology, history, and representations in paintings, photographs, and literary essays. This examination seeks to understand the American forest in its scientific and economic parameters, as well as the historic, social, and ideological dimensions which have contributed to the evolution of our present attitudes toward the forest. Also listed as Undergrad Interdisciplinary Studies C136, History of Art C189, and Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C191.
(F,SP) Lovell, McBride
 
Intellectual History of the United States since 1865  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C132B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C132B after taking History 132B.
Description: In this course we will be discussing key developments in U.S. thought since the middle of the nineteenth century, roughly beginning with the reception of Darwin. The broader story told in the class weaves together in the history of science and engineering, the arts and popular culture, philosophy, and education. Our goal is to trace how ideas, whether they are dominant, challenging, or look back, have affected the ways in which Americans live together. We will look at how intellectual life has empowered and expanded the capacity of Americans to understand their world and achieve goals more effectively. We will also consider how intellectual theories have contributed to inequality and injustice. Also listed as History C132B.
 
Information Technology and Society  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C134 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C134 after taking Africam American Studies 134.
Description: This course assesses the role of information technology in the digitalization of society by focusing on the deployment of e-government, e-commerce, e-learning, the digital city, telecommuting, virtual communities, internet time, the virtual office, and the geography of cyber space. The course will also discuss the role of information technology in the governance and economic development of society. Also listed as African American Studies C134.
(F,SP) Laguerre
 
Civil Rights and Social Movements in U.S. History  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 139AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: Beginning with the onset of World War II, America experienced not a sigular,unitary Civil Rights Movement -- as is typically portrayed in standard textbood accounts and the collective memory -- but rather a variety of contemporaneous civil rights and their related social movements. This course explores the history, presenting a top-down (political and legal history), bottom-up (social and cultural history), and comparative (by race and ethnicity as well as region) view of America's struggles for racial equality from roughly World War II until the present. Also listed as History C139C.
(F,SP)
 
Native American Literature  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C152 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Native American Studies 151 is recommended but not required.
Description: An analysis of the written and oral tradition developed by Native Americans. Emphasis will be placed on a multifaceted approach (aesthetic, linguistic, psychological, historical, and cultural) in examining American Indian literature. Also listed as Native American Studies C152.
 
The American Designed Landscape Since 1850  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C171 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course surveys the history of American landscape architecture since 1850 in four realms: 1) urban open spaces--that is squares, plazas, parks, and recreation systems; 2) urban and suburban design; 3) regional and environmental planning; 4) gardens. The course will review the cultural and social contexts which have shaped and informed landscape architecture in the United States since the advent of the public parks movement, as well as, the aesthetic precepts, environmental concerns, horticultural practices, and technological innovations of American landscapes. Students will complete a midterm, final, and a research assignment. Also listed as Landscape Architecture C171.
(F,SP) Mozingo
 
History of American Business  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C172 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will examine selected aspects of the history of American business. Included will be discussions of the evolution of the large corporation, the development of modern managerial techniques, and the changing relationship of business, government, and labor. Also listed as Undergrad. Business Administration C172.
(F,SP) Rosen
 
Visual Autobiography  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) C174 [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Since visual and literary studies have historically been viewed as separate disciplines, we will use theories from both to study those forms of self-representation that defy disciplinary boundaries, or what we call "visual autobiography." The course aims to help students become conversant with the elements of alphabetic literacy (reading and writing) and visual literacy (observing and making) in order to develop a third distinctive textual/visual literacy. Also listed as English C143V, Visual Studies C185A, and Undergrad Interdisciplinary Studies C135.
(F,SP)
 
Research and Writing in American Studies  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 189 [1-3 units]
Course Format: One to three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Intended for American studies majors.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course is designed to encourage research skills, critical thinking, and effective writing. An intensive reading and research seminar, the course will assist students in the development of skills fundamental to advanced research in the humanities, social sciences, and cultural studies. In addition to examining some topics in current American studies scholarship, students will conduct semester-long research projects. The effort entails identification of research topics, cultivation of interdisciplinary methodologies, compilation of annotated bibliographies, and completion of a literature review, which may serve as the first portion of the American studies senior thesis. The course is strongly recommended for those who have been out of touch with the conventions of academic research and writing or who might wish to pursue a graduate degree in the future.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Senior Thesis  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 190 [4 units]
Course Format: Individual meeting with thesis adviser.
Description: All American Studies majors must satisfy the senior thesis requirement. Three options are available:AS 190-Senior Thesis, AS 191-Senior Seminar, or students may (with prior Faculty Advisor approval) enroll in an upper division seminar appropriate to their concentration for which they write a substantial research paper. Students planning to enroll in AS 190 must complete the "Thesis Proposal/Adviser Agreement" (available in the departmental office) prior to the semester in which the thesis is written.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Senior Seminar  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 191 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Declared majors with senior standing.
Description: Students will meet in seminar and will be required to write individual research papers based on the general themes or issues of the seminar. The particular themes/issues will be outlined on the American Studies Course List provided each semester by the American Studies office.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Honors Thesis  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) H195 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Senior-standing major in American studies; completion of 101 and 102, 3.51 overall GPA, and 3.65 GPA for classes in the major.
Description: This is a required course for students wishing to graduate with honors in American studies. Entails writing a bachelor's thesis pertaining to the student's individual area of concentration within the American studies major. The completed thesis will be read by the thesis supervisor and one other faculty member.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 198 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Regulations set by College of Letters and Science.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Seminars for the group study of selected topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Topics will vary from semester to semester. Students must have completed 60 units in order to be eligible to enroll.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research for Upper Division Majors  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format: individual conferences
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Course may be repeated for credit as texts vary. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Directed individual study on special topics approved by an American studies faculty member. Enrollment restrictions apply; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Teaching Interdisciplinary American Studies  --  American Studies  (AMERSTD) 300 [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This course will introduce graduate students to a number of techniques and theories used in teaching at the university level. In particular, it will focus on the challenges of teaching interdisciplinary American studies courses that rely on a range of materials and methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines and that address students who come from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to Biological Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 1 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Anthropology 1 after taking Anthropology N1, XAnthropology 1.
Description: An introduction to human evolution. Physical and behavioral adaptations of humans and their prehistoric and living relatives. Issues in evolutionary theory, molecular evolution, primate behavior, interpretation of fossils. Prehistoric activities, racial differences, genetic components of behavior are defined and evaluated.
(SP)
 
Introduction to Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 2 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Anthropology 2 after taking Anthropology 2AC, XAnthropology 2AC but may remove a deficient grade.
Description: Prehistory and cultural growth.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 2AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Anthropology 2AC after taking Anthropology 2, XAnthropology 2AC but may remove a deficient grade.
Description: Prehistory and cultural growth. Introduction to the methods, goals, and theoretical concepts of archaeology with attention to the empact archaeology has had on the construction of the histories of diverse communities - Native Americans, Hispanics, and Euro-Americans. It fulfills the requirements for 2.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 3 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 3 after taking 3AC; deficient grade in 3 may be removed by taking 3AC.
Description: The structure and dynamics of human culture and social institutions.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Social/Cultural Anthropology (American Cultures)  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 3AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 3AC after taking 3; deficient grade in 3AC may be removed by taking 3.
Description: The structure and dynamics of human cultures and social institutions from a comparative perspective with special attention to American cultures and their roots. Case studies will illustrate the principles presented in the course. It fulfills the requirements for 3.
(F,SP)
 
Reading and Composition in Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) R5B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Reading and composition courses based on the anthropological literature. These courses provide an introduction to issues distinctive of anthropological texts and introduce students to distinctive forms of anthropological writing, such as ethnography and anthropological prehistory. Readings will be chosen from a variety of texts by authors whose works span the discipline, from bioanthropology to archaeology and sociocultural anthropology. Satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement.
(F,SP)
 
The California Frontier  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 10AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: This course will focus upon the beginning of the historic period in California and on the interactions between California Indians and colonizing peoples. The course will begin with an introduction to the indigenous peoples of California and to their contacts with the expanding world system. It will focus upon the Spanish/Mexican, Russian, and American periods and will conclude with an overview of how these several communities, colonizer and colonized, interacted with and shaped one another.
(F,SP)
 
Seminar in Physical Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 15 [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; lower-division standing.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Each instructor will select one or more of the following topics in physical anthropology: evolutionary theory, the fossil record, stages of the life cycle, the biological basis of behavior, the roots of human behavior, human adaptation, genetic components of human behavior, ecological adaptations, controversies and issues in primatology, the social behavior and ecology of monkeys and apes, behavioral evolution, and a host of other current research and theoretical issues.
(F,SP)
 
Freshman Seminar  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 24 [1 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of seminar per semester.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit with different topic and different instructor.
Grading option: Sections 1-10 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis. Sections 11-20 to be graded on a letter-grade basis.
Description: The Freshman Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics may vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen.
(F,SP)
 
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 39 [2-4 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per unit.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit when topic changes.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.
(F,SP)
 
 --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 39A [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Sophomore Seminar  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 84 [1,2 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks. Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five weeks.
Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-grade basis.
Description: Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.
(F,SP)
 
Directed Group Study  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 98 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Three to twelve hours of group study (or tutorial or fieldwork) per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; freshmen or sophomore status.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Organized group study on topics selected by lower division students under the sponsorship and direction of a member of the Anthropology Department's faculty.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 99 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Three to twelve hours of tutorial per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; freshmen and sophomores only.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Individual research by lower division students.
(F,SP)
 
Human Paleontology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C100 [5 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Anthropology 1, Biology 1A-1B.
Description: Origin and relationships of the extinct forms of mankind. Also listed as Integrative Biology C185L.
Offered alternate years. (SP) White
 
Introduction to Human Osteology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C103 [6 units]
Course Format: Six hours of lecture and fourteen hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Anthropology 1, Biology 1B.
Description: An intensive study of the human skeleton, reconstruction of individual and population characteristics, emphasizing methodology and analysis of human populations from archaeological and paleontological contexts, taphonomy, and paleopathology. Also listed as Integrative Biology C142L.
Offered alternate years. (SP) White
 
Advanced Human Osteology Laboratory  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 104L [1-4 units]
Course Format: Three to six hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 103 with an "A" on the final or an "A" in the course and consent of instructor.
Description: Laboratory analysis of human skeletal remains including original research on paleodemography, paleopathology, metric and non-metric analyses, dental anthropology, curation, and computerization of Hearst Museum skeletal collections.
(F,SP)
 
Primate Evolution  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 105 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 1 recommended.
Description: A consideration of the major groups of primates with an emphasis on the evolution of behavior.
(F,SP)
 
Primate Behavior  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 106 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 1 or Integrative Biology 32 recommended.
Description: Humans, apes, and selected monkeys are the primates of concern, and among this array patterns and degrees of social behavior vary greatly. Lectures present a general introduction to behavior and its ecological context, the interaction of biology and behavior from an evolutionary perspective, and an examination of the roots of modern human behavior.
(F,SP)
 
Evolution of the Human Brain  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 107 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Upper division undergraduate standing and Anthropology 1 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Description: Introduction to comparative vertebrate brain anatomy, neural development, and sensory-motor functions that are relevant to the study of human brain evolution and the evolution of uniquely human mental and behavioral capacities. Emphasis is on understanding the processes of evolution that are responsible for species differences in brain structure and function. Special attention will be given to animal communication, vocalization, neurolinguistics, and theories of language evolution.
(F) Deacon
 
Theory and Method in Physical Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 110 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 1.
Description: A unitary view of past history and current trends in the field of Physical Anthropology, emphasizing schools of thought, important figures and major areas of research.
(F,SP)
 
Evolution of Human Behavior  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 111 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will ask to what extent human behavior in its various individual, group, social, and cultural dimensions can be understood using the relatively small number of basic principles provided by evolutionary biological considerations.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Biological Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 112 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week and one or more hours of laboratory may be required based on topic.
Prerequisites: Anthropology 1 recommended.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Varying topics covering current discoveries, research, theories, fieldwork, etc., in biological anthropology. Topics vary with instructor.
(F,SP)
 
History of Anthropological Thought  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 114 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Formerly 114A
Description: This course will present a history of anthropological thought from the mid-19th century to the present, and will draw upon the major subdisciplines of anthropology. It will focus both upon the integration of the anthropological subdisciplines and upon the relationships between these and other disciplines outside anthropology.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Medical Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 115 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: Cultural, psychological, and biological aspects of the definitions, causes, symptoms, and treatment of illness. Comparative study of medical systems, practitioners, and patients.
(F,SP)
 
Environmental Effects on Human Health and Disease  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 116 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 1 or 3, plus a course in general biology or consent of instructor.
Description: Examination of major disease-related ecological constraints of diverse eco-systems and the biological responses of human populations to these stresses: arctic, high-altitude, arid zones, grasslands, humid tropics, urban.
(F,SP)
 
The Anthropology of Aging and the Life Course  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 117 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 is recommended.
Description: An anthropological approach to the study of age and aging and of the different periods of the life course: birth, infancy, childhood, youth and adolescence, adulthood and middle age, old age, and dying. How might we think--about time, the body, and what it means to talk about life--through a focus on age?
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Medical Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 119 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Upper division status and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special topics in cultural, biomedical and applied approaches to medical anthropology.
(F,SP)
 
Historical Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 121 
Course Format:
Description: Archaeology of the period from the first European settlement in America, Australasia, South Africa, etc. The following series of 121, Historical Archaeology sequence courses may be taken in any order.
 
American Material Culture  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 121A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
Description: Formerly 121. Patterns in material culture as it reflects behavioral and psychological aspects of American culture since the 17th century. Topics include architecture, domestic artifacts, mortuary art, foodways, and trash disposal. Euro-American, African American, and Native-American examples are considered.
(F,SP)
 
American Material Culture  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 121AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 121AC after taking 121A.
Description: Patterns in material culture as it reflects behavioral and psychological aspects of American culture since the 17th century. Topics include architecture, domestic artifacts, mortuary art, foodways, and trash disposal.
(F,SP)
 
Theoretical Approaches in American Historical Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 121B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
Description: This course will provide a background in the theoretical and methodological development of American historical archaeology, with particular emphasis on the ways in which archaeologists have approached the integration of archaeological, documentary, oral historical and ethnohistoric data. Emphasis on continuing theoretical developments in the discipline. Politics of historical archaeology, and ways in which historical archaeologists and other public historians make the past relevant to the present.
(F,SP)
 
Historical Artifact Identification and Analysis  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 121C [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 121A, 121AC, or 121B recommended and consent of instructor.
Description: Learn to work with historical artifacts from the stage of recovery through the stages of analysis and interpretation. The focus is on the analysis of materials (i.e., ceramic, glass, metal, bone, shell artifacts) recovered from historic sites. Skills acquired include how to identify, date, record, illustrate, photograph, catalog, and interpret historical archaeological materials through a combination of lectures, lab exercises, and a research paper.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology of the Americas  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 122 
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2.
Description: A group of courses that examine the native societies and cultures of the Americas in the past, as known from a variety of sources used by archaeologists, including study of material culture, documents, visual culture, and the use of ethnographic accounts.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology of North America  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 122A [4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: 2.
Description: Formerly 122. Prehistory of North American Indians; prehistoric culture areas; relations with historic Indians.
(F,SP)
 
Culture Contact in North America  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 122B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This culture examines the implications of early encounters between Native Americans and Europeans, including how indigenous peoples responded to European contact and colonialism, and how the outcomes of these encounters influenced cultural developments in postcolonial contexts. The study employs a holistic approach that integrates evidence from archaeology, ethnography, ethnohistory, linguistics, biological anthropology, and native oral traditions. Case studies from the Caribbean, Florida, Louisiana, Virginia, Alaska, Hawaii, and California will be included.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology of Central America  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 122C [4 units]
Course Format:
Description: A survey of what archaeology can tell us about the pre-Columbian cultures of Central America: the Olmec, Maya, Aztec, and their neighbors.
(F,SP)
 
World of Ancient Maya  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 122D [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: A survey of the history of development of Maya society and culture in Central American prior to Eurpean contact in the 16th century AD.
(F,SP)
 
Andean Archaeology: People of the Andes  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 122E [4 units]
Course Format:
Description: This course covers the archaeology and history of the indigenous societies of the Andean region of South America. The lectures and readings emphasize major political, economic, social, and symbolic processes in the development of the Andean civilizations. Particular attention is paid to the development of the early states along the coast of Peru. The development of major centers in the highlands, and the relationship between the political, economic, and religious systems of the later empires and earlier political structures and social processes, are also emphasized.
(F,SP)
 
California Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 122F [4 units]
Course Format:
Description: Prehistory of California Indians; selected archaeological sites and current issues in interpretations.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology of the American Southwest  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 122G [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will outline the development of vative cultures in the American Southwest from Paleo-Indian times (ca. 11,500 BC) through early European contact (ca. A.D. 1600). Topics to be covered include the greater environment, early foaging culture, the development of agriculture and village life, the emergence and decline of regional alliances, abandonment, and reorganization, and changes in social organization, external relations and trade. The course is designed as an advanced upper division seminar for students majoring in anthropology with an emphasis in archaeology. Can be taught as a distance learning course with another university.
(F,SP)
 
Old World Cultures  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 123 
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2.
Description: A variety of courses that consider the peoples and past cultures and societies of the Old World, through the study of archaeology, ethnography, and other relevant fields. No specific sequence to courses; students may take any or all of the following in any sequence.
 
Stone Age Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 123A [4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: 2.
Description: Overview of stone age cultures and development. Selected topics or geographic areas of paleolithic research.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology of Africa  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 123B [4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: 2.
Description: This course provides an overview of the archaeological history of the African continent.Through case studies,it will explore Africa beginning with human evolution and cultural development to later colonial encounters and their impacts. It will also examine how groups and governments have used the past in politics, and the roles heritage plays in contemporary African Societies.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology of Europe  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 123C [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2.
Description: Formerly 127 Selected topics and research problems in the archaeology of the Pleistocene and/or post-Pleistocene of Europe.
(F,SP)
 
Mediterranean Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 123E [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
Description: Prehistory and early civilizations of the Mediterranean basin and its hinterland.
(F,SP)
 
Disciplining Near Eastern Archaeology: Explorers, Archaeologists, and Tourists in the Contemporary Middle East  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C123F [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Near Eastern Studies 10, 15, or 18 recommended.
Description: This course examines the roles that Near Eastern archaeology plays within the context of recent Middle Eastern history and society, from 1800 to the present day. Topics include the discipline's entanglement with imperialism, nationalism, science, tourism, the antiquities trade, media, and war. Students will examine and discuss ethnographies, technical reports, memoirs, films, and images. Also listed as Near Eastern Studies C119.
(F,SP) Porter
 
Pacific Cultures  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 124 
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2.
Description: A variety of courses that consider the peoples and past cultures and societies of Oceania and the Pacific, through the study of archaeology, ethnography, ethnohistory and other relevant fields. No specific sequence of courses; students may take any or all of the following in any sequence.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology of the South Pacific  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 124A [4 units]
Course Format:
Description: Selected topics and research problems in the archaeology of the southern Pacific from prehistory through to the establishment of complex chiefdoms in many locales. Stress on current issues and interpretations.
(F,SP)
 
Hawaiian Ethnohistory  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 124AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Description: Developmental foundations of the 20th-century multicultural society of Hawaii, during the period 1778-1900, explored through an explicitly anthropological perspective. The following ethnic groups are emphasized: Native Hawaiians, British-American whites, Chinese, and Japanese.
(F,SP)
 
Hawaiian Ethnohistory  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 124B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Description: Developmental foundations of the 20th-century multicultural society of Hawaii, during the period 1778-1900, explored through an explicitly anthropological perspective. The following ethnic groups are emphasized: Native Hawaiians, British-American whites, Chinese, and Japanese.
(F,SP)
 
Human Biogeography of the Pacific  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C124C [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Anthropology 1 or Biology 1B or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C124C after taking 187. A deficient grade in 187 maybe removed by taking C124C and/or Integrative Biology C187.
Description: This course examines the history of human dispersal across Oceania from the perspectives of biogeography and evolutionary ecology. H. sapiens faced problems of dispersal, colonization, and extinction, and adapted in a variety of ways to the diversity of insular ecosystems. A dual evolutionary model takes into account cultural evolution and transmission, as well as biological evolution of human populations. This course also explores the impacts of human populations on isolated and fragile insular ecosystems, and the reciprocal effects of anthropogenic change on human cultures. Also listed as Integrative Biology C187.
(F,SP) Kirch
 
Asian Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 125 
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Courses focus on past Asian peoples, culture, and societies through the study of archaeology, ethnography, and other relevant fields. These courses meet the area requirement and may be taken in any sequence.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology of East Asia  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C125A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Prehistoric and protohistoric archaeology in China, Japan, and Korea. Also listed as East Asian Languages and Cultures C175.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology and Japanese Identities  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C125B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly Formerly Anthropology 125B
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C125B after taking 125B.
Description: Course explores stereotypical images of traditional Japanese culture and people through archaeological analysis. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing lifeways of past residents of the Japanese islands, including commoners, samurai, and nobles. Consideration will be given to the implications of these archaeological studies for our understanding of Japanese identities. Also listed as Japanese C176.
(F,SP)
 
Bioarchaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 127 
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 1, Biology 1B.
Description: A variety of courses related to bioarchaeology.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Skeletal Biology and Bioarchaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 127A [4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 127A after taking either C103 or Integrative Biology C142.
Description: An introduction to skeletal biology and anatomy to understand how skeletal remains can be used in reconstructing patterns of adaptation and biocultural evolution in past populations, emphasizing a problem-based approach to bioarchaeological questions.
(F,SP)
 
Reconstruction of Life in Bioarchaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 127B [4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: 127A or C103/Integrative Biology C142L is required.
Description: This course deals with the skeletal biology of past populations, covering both the theoretical approaches and critical analysis of methods used in the study of skeletal and dental remains, and is considered the continuing course for those that have already taken introduction to skeletal biology, 127A.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 128 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Current topics in method and theory of archaeological research, varying with instructor.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Archaeology/Area  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 128A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2 recommended.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special topics in archaeology which meet the area requirement for the anthropology major.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Archaeology/Method  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 128M [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 2 recommended.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special topics in archaeology which meet the method requirement for the anthropology major.
(F,SP)
 
Topical Areas in Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 129 
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2. (2 or 3 for 129A.)
Description: These courses explore contemporary topics in archaeology that transcend time periods or cultural areas. Courses may be taken in any sequence.
(F,SP)
 
Prehistoric Art  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 129A [4 units]
Course Format:
Description: Draws on study of art in non-literate societies and on archaeology to explore a range of prehistoric arts in cultural contexts; e.g., rock art; Ice Age Arts; prehistoric ceramics. Usses illustrative materials from the Hearst Museum.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 129C [4 units]
Course Format:
Description: Course will provide an overview of hunter-gatherer archaeology, focusing on the history of hunter-gatherer archaeology in North America and Britian; long-term changes in hunter-gatherer subsistence, settlement, mortuary/ceremonial practices and crafts/trade; social archaeology of hunter-gatherers including studies of gender, cognition, and cultural landscapes; and discussions of the relevance of hunter-gatherer studies in the context of world archaeology.
(F,SP)
 
Holocene Paleoecology: How Humans Changed the Earth  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C129D [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Either Anthropology 2 or Biology 1A.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Anthropology C129D/Integrative Biology C155 after taking Anthropology 129D or Integrative Biology 155. A deficient grade in Anthropology 129D or Integrative Biology 155 may be removed by taking Anthropology C129D/Integrative Biology C155.
Description: Since the end of the Pleistocene and especially with the development of agriculturally based societies humans have had cumulative and often irreversible impacts on natural landscapes and biotic resources worldwide. Thus "global change" and the biodiversity crisis are not exclusively developments of the industrial and post-industrial world. This course uses a multi-disciplinary approach, drawing upon methods and data from archaeology, palynology, geomorphology, paleontology, and historical ecology to unravel the broad trends of human ecodynamics over the past 10,000 years. Also listed as Integrative Biology C155.
(F,SP) Kirch
 
Household Archeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 129E [4 units]
Course Format:
Description: This class explores the questions: why study the archaeology of households? How do we define households and how can we identify and study them archaeologically? What research questions, strategies, and methodologies does the archaeological investigation of households entail? How does the study of households contribute to multiscalar approaches for understanding social organization? Why is this important? What are the causes and effects of changing scales of analysis?
(F,SP)
 
The Archaeology of Health and Disease  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C129F [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Description: This course explores how archaeologists and bioarchaeologists study human families' and communities' conceptualizations and experiences of health and health care cross-culturally and through time. Students will be exposed to case studies drawing upon skeletal and material cultural evidence. Also listed as Letters and Science C140U.
(F,SP)
 
History and Theory of Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 130 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2.
Formerly 136
Description: A critical review of the historical background and philosophical premises of past and present anthropological theory with respect to its concepts of time and change.
(F,SP)
 
Geoarchaeological Science  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C131 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Anthropology 2 or Earth and Planetary Science 50, or consent of instructor.
Formerly 131
Description: This survey and laboratory course will cover a broad range of current scientific techniques used in the field and in the analysis of geoarchaeological materials. The course includes field and laboratory studies in analytical chemistry, geology, petrology/petography and a survey of dating materials in archaeology, the historical development of geoarchaeological science and other aspects of archaeological science applied to geoarchaeological materials. Also listed as Earth and Planetary Science C171.
(F,SP)
 
Analysis of Archaeological Materials  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 132 
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
Description: Principles of analysis of inorganic archaeolological materials, including, but not limited to stone, ceramics, and metals, with laboratory instruction. These courses meet the method requirement for the major and may be taken in any sequence.
(F,SP)
 
Analysis of Archaeological Ceramics  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 132A [4 units]
Course Format:
Description: Discussion of and laboratory instruction in methods of analysis of ceramics used by archaeologists to establish a time scale, to document interconnections between different areas, sites, or groups of people, to suggest what activities were carried out at particular sites, and to understand the organization of ceramic production itself.
(F,SP)
 
Analysis of the Archaeological Record  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 134 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
Description: Guidance in the preparation of excavated materials for publication, including sampling and analysis strategy, drawing, photography and write-up.
 
Field Course in Archaeological Methods  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 134A [6 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture and eight hours of fieldwork per week. Three hours of lecture and twenty hours of fieldwork for four weeks.
Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
Formerly 133 and N133
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Practical experience in the field study of archaeological sites and materials. Coverage may include reconnaissance, mapping, recording, and excavation.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeological Laboratory Practicum  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 134B [1-4 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture and two to eleven hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: This is a practical laboratory analysis course that offers a team of students the opportunity to work closely with faculty on an aspect of their laboratory research in archaeological physical or natural sciences, or archaeological material analysis. May be taken concurrently with other laboratory courses or as the logical follow-up to a field school. Projects will vary by course.
(F,SP)
 
Paleoethnobotany: Archaeological Methods and Laboratory Techniques  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 135 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 2 and consent of instructor.
Description: An introduction to the basic approaches and techniques in archaeobotanical analysis. A series of different data types and their unique approaches will be discussed, including phytoliths, pollen, and DNA, with an emphasis on macrofloral remains. Laboratory study will include the major classes of plant remains likely to be encountered in archaeological sites. Discussion will emphasize the use of plant remains to answer archaeological questions, rather than study the plant remains for their own sake. Microscope work and computing will be included.
(F,SP)
 
Environmental Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 135B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 2.
Description: The major issues, research objectives, databases, and techniques involved in the study of past society's relationship and interaction with the natural environment. Particularly methods that use "noncultural" information in archaeological research, but with a cultural orientation. Major subjects addressed will be paleoenvironmental reconstruction; human-environment interaction, impact, and environmental degradation; paleodiet and domestication; land-use and social environments; with an emphasis on ecofactual analysis.
(F,SP)
 
Public Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 136 
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: A variety of courses that introduce principles in the public aspects of anthropology. These courses may be taken in any order.
(F,SP)
 
Museum Exhibit Curation and Design  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 136A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and four hours of studio per week.
Description: A practical introduction to contemporary museum approaches to exhibition design, with particular application to the design of exhibits that present cultural heritage in anthropology, art, and natural history museums. Both the theory of museum exhibit desing and practice will be covered, including critiques of representation; issues of cultural heritage; conversation, education, and installation standards; and incorporation of interactivity, including through digital media.
(F,SP)
 
Museum Methods  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 136B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will introduce participants to the fundamentals of contemporary museum practices. It is intended for two groups of students: individuals who may be thinking of conducting research in museums, and may benefit from an understanding of the way these institutions work; and individuals who may be thinking of museum work as a post-graduate career. The course will include both discussion of museum concepts and practical application of these concepts through real-world exercises. While the course fulfills the method requirement, it covers practices of art, natural history, and science museums as well.
(F,SP)
 
Multimedia Authoring Part 1  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 136C [4 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.
Description: This course is the first part in a two-part series of courses that coach students in research and presentation of archaeological information through nonlinear multimedia authoring. The content of the course varies and may focus on an area or a topic depending on instructor. Students experience the first stage of multimedia authoring process: research, planning, and design. The focus is on content development and evaluation of digital research sources, with an introduction to software skills and practice.
(F,SP)
 
Digital Documentation and Representation of Cultural Heritage  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 136E [4 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.
Description: A practical, hands-on overview of cutting-edge digital technology that is being used and developed for the documentation of archaeological sites. This course outlines a digital documentation strategy for collecting, processing, and integrating digital data from a variety of different media into a dataset that holistically describes place, including landscape, architecture, and other cultural artifacts.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology After-School Program  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 136H [4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
Formerly 128M
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: An opportunity to work with sixth-graders in exploring the worlds of archaeology, history, and computer-based technologies. Meets the method requirement for the anthropology major.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology and the Media  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 136I [4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: 2.
Description: Focus on the use of digital media to create narrative about the practice and products of archaeology. Students build a critical awareness of the way digital media are used by archaeologists, journalists, film and TV producers, and others. Students will experience the introductory stage of the digital media authoring process.
(F,SP)
 
Archaeology and the Media Method  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 136J [4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: 136I.
Description: Focus on the use of digital media to create narratives about the practice and products of archaeology. Students work in teams to produce short videos (digital narrative or digital stories) from their own research. Students share equally the responsibilities of research and writing, directing, camera, sound recording, and editing. This course satisfies the method requirement for the anthropology major.
(F,SP)
 
Who Owns the Past? Cultural Heritage in a Digital Age  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C136K [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C136K after taking Letters and Science 127.
Description: A cross-disciplinary exploration of cultural heritage on a global and local scale through discussion, debate, in-class activities, and team-based research projects that draw attention to the impacts of digital technology. Themes include the creation and management of heritage sites; the ethics of archaeologists as stewards of heritage; listening to multiple voices of interest groups; destruction and looting; and the preservation, conservation, and public presentation of heritage. Also listed as Letters and Science C180W.
(F,SP)
 
Energy, Culture and Social Organization  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 137 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will consider the human dimensions of particular energy production and consumption patterns. It will examine the influence of culture and social organization on energy use, energy policy, and quality of life issues in both the domestic and international setting. Specific treatment will be given to mind-sets, ideas of progress, cultural variation in time perspectives and resource use, equity issues, and the role of power holders in energy related questions.
(F,SP)
 
History and Theory of Ethnographic Film  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 138A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or 114.
Description: The course will trace the development of ethnographic film from its beginnings at the turn of the century to the present. In addition to looking at seminal works in the field, more recent and innovative productions will be viewed and analyzed. Topics of interest include the role of visual media in ethnography, ethics in filmmaking, and the problematic relationship between seeing and believing. Requirements include film critiques, a film proposal, and a final exam.
(F,SP)
 
Field Production of Ethnographic Film  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 138B [5 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 138A.
Description: This course is devoted to training students in methods of ethnographic field film production. Based on the previous coursework in Anthro 138A, students will work toward the production of an ethnographic video from elected project proposals. In addition to weekly discussions of student projects, guest consultants and lecturers will lend their expertise on aspects of production as well as editing.
(F,SP)
 
Controlling Processes  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 139 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Those with at least one social science course will be more familiar with the subject matter.
Description: This course will discuss key theoretical concepts related to power and control and examine indirect mechanisms and processes by which direct control becomes hidden, voluntary, and unconscious in industrialized societies. Readings will cover language, law, politics, religion, medicine, sex, and gender.
(F,SP)
 
The Anthropology of Food  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 140 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Description: This course examines the place of food in society and includes discussions of identity, taste, taboos, ritual, traditions, nationalism, health, alcohol use, civilizing society, globalism, and the global politics of food.
(F,SP)
 
Comparative Society  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 141 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.
Description: Theories of social structure, functional interrelationships of social institutions. Primary emphasis on non-Western societies.
(F,SP)
 
Kinship and Family  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 142 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3.
Description: Comparative study of the family and kinship systems in non-state and state societies.
(F,SP)
 
Urban Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 145 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.
Description: A consideration of anthropological concepts and methods for the urbanization process in towns and cities.
(F,SP)
 
Mobile City Chronicles: Gaming with New Technologies of Detection and Security  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C146 [5 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of studio per week.
Description: This course studies the city through cases of 19th and 21st century urban detection, including detective fiction, epidemiology, urban planning, surveillance, ethnography, and related technologies. Students develop and playtest cellphone games that in turn require players to investigate cities. This "gaming the city" uses smart phones not only to read existing databases but also to write to them, producing new urban practice and knowledge. The course is organized as a research and game lab. Also listed as Practice of Art C179.
(F,SP)
 
Anthropology of Gender  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 147A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.
Description: The course explores major developments within feminist theory in the 20th century within an international context, with special attention to issues of class, culture, race, ethnicity, and sexuality.
(F,SP)
 
Sexuality, Culture, and Colonialism  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C147B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Anthropology 3 or Sociology 3.
Description: An introduction to social theory and ethnographic methodology in the cross-cultural study of sexuality, particularly sexual orientation and gender identity. The course will stress the relationships between culture, international and local political economy, and the representation and experience of what we will provisionally call homosexual and transgendered desires or identities. Also listed as Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender St C147B.
(F,SP)
 
Anthropology of the Environment  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 148 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.
Description: Surveys anthropological perspectives on the environment and examines differing cultural constructions of nature. Coverage includes theory, method, and case materials extending from third world agrarian contexts to urban North America. Topics may include cultural ecology, political ecology, cultural politics of nature, and environmental imaginaries.
(F,SP)
 
Psychological Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 149 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.
Description: In the contemporary world, different systems of knowledge, philosophies, and techniques of the self, understandings of normality and pathology, illness and healing, are increasingly engaged in a dialogue with each other in the lives, on the bodies, and in the imagination of people. The terms of this dialogue are often unequal and painful, yet they are also productive of new subjectivities and new voices. It is the task of a renewed psychological anthropology to study and reflect on these processes. Topics to be covered in this class include new forms of the subject and ethics at the intersection of psychical/psychiatric, political, and religious processes and discources; ethno-psychiatry, psychoanalysis, the psychology of colonization and racism; anthropological approaches to possession and altered states, emotion, culture, and the imagination, madness and mental illness. The specific stress will be on the stakes of anthropology of the psyche today, for an understanding of power and subjugation, delusion and the imagination, violence, and the possibility of new forms of life.
(F,SP)
 
Utopia: Art and Power in Modern Times  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 150 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per week.
Description: Modern times have been dominated by utopian visions of how to achieve a happy future society. Artists in competing social systems played a central role in the development of these visions. But artistic experiments were filled with paradoxes, contributing to the creation not only of the most liberating and progressive ideals and values but also to the most oppressive regimes and ideologies. The course questions: what is art, what can it achieve and destroy, what is beauty, artistic freedom, and the relationship between esthetics, ethics, and power?
(F,SP)
 
Art and Culture  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 152 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Graphic and plastic arts and their relations to culture in non-literate societies; illustrative material from the Hearst Museum of Anthropology.
(F,SP)
 
Modernity  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 155 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This upper division course presents episodes in the understanding of anthropos (man, humanity, civilization, etc.) in its modern figuration. The course will juxtapose the conceptual repertoire of key thinkers about modernity, and will examine episodes in the history of the arts and/or sciences.
(F,SP)
 
Anthropology of the Contemporary  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 156 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course is an introduction to the conceptual field of "the contemporary," a stylization of both old and new elements that stands in contrast to "modernity", and "post modernity", and which opens up inquiries into the actual state of things, particulary for anthropology. Anthropology 155, while not required, is highly recommended as a prerequisite.
(F,SP)
 
Politics and Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 156A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3.
Description: Anthropological concepts relevant to the comparative analysis of political ethnography and socio-political change. Particular attention will be given to the interrelations of culture and politics.
(F,SP)
 
Culture and Power  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 156B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The course examines how representations are situated within fields of power and, in turn, how political considerations are translated into cultural forms. Topics include: philosophy and history of social science, power/knowledge, the social, difference and power, social science and ethics.
(F,SP)
 
Anthropology of Law  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 157 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.
Description: Comparative survey of the ethnography of law; methods and concepts relevant to the comparative analysis of the forms and functions of law.
(F,SP)
 
Religion and Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 158 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.
Description: A consideration of the interplay between religious beliefs and institutions and other aspects of culture.
(F,SP)
 
Forms of Folklore  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 160AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Upper division standing.
Description: A world-wide survey of the major and minor forms of folklore with special emphasis upon proverbs, riddles, superstitions, games, songs, and narratives.
(F,SP)
 
Narrative Folklore  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 161 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The study of folktales, myths, legends, and other forms of verbal art; methods and theories of folklore.
(F,SP)
 
Topics in Folklore  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 162 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special topics in folklore or ethno-musicology.
(F,SP)
 
Language, Culture, and Society  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 166 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.
Description: This course examines the complex relationships between language, culture, and society. The materials in the course draw on the fields of linguistic anthropology, linguistics, sociolinguistics, philosophy of language, discourse analysis, and literary criticism to explore theories about how language is shaped by, and in turn shapes, our understandings about the world, social relations, identities, power, aesthetics, etc.
(F,SP)
 
Data Analysis and Computational Methods  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 169A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
Description: This course capitalizes on a successful approach of using definitional formulas to emphasize concepts of statistics, rather than rote memorization in both qualitative and quantitative anthropology. This conceptual approach constantly reminds the students of the logic behind what they are learning. Procedures are taught verbally, numerically, and visually, to reach students with different learning styles.
(F,SP)
 
Research Theory and Methods in Socio-Cultural Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 169B [5 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 3.
Description: Introduction to research problems and research design techniques. Will involve local field research on the collection, analysis, and presentation of data. This course requires 15 hours of work per week including class time, outside work and preparation. One section meeting per week will be required.
(F,SP)
 
Research Theory and Methods in Linguistic Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 169C [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Upper division undergraduate standing.
Description: This course provides an introduction to selected theories and methods in Linguistic Anthropology, with a focus on topics of relevance to ethnographic fieldwork. Readings and lectures are organized into three modules: Linguistic categories and their consequences for thought, the effects of social context on meaning, and the empirical basis of research on language.
(F) Hanks
 
China  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 170 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Chinese culture and society with an emphasis on the village level.
(F,SP)
 
Japan  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 171 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Ethnological treatment of historic and modern Japanese culture, covering history, art and religion; family, kinship and community organization; political, economic and occupational patterns; cultural psychology and social problems in modern Japan. The approach utilizes both sociological and psycho-cultural forms of analysis.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in American Cultures  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 172AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit with different instructor.
Description: Various topics which meet the American cultures requirement, taught by members of the Social/Cultural faculty. See the Schedule of Classes for each semester, and the department's Internal Catalog for course title, description, instructor name, and specific format.
(F,SP)
 
California Historical Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 174AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Combining historical archaeology, ethnohistory, and ethnography, this course will take account of ethnic groups and their interaction in early colonial California; Native Americans; mission, presidio, pueblo, and rancho communities of Spanish/Mexican California; Russian frontier society at Fort Ross; and American expansion into California, especially the Gold Rush. The course will also examine how the colonial past affects ethnic relations and cultural identity among contemporary California Indians.
(F,SP)
 
Oceania  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 178 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Ethnography of Oceania: Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, New Guinea, and Australia.
(F,SP)
 
Ethnography of the Maya  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 179 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 recommended.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 179 after taking 188 spring or fall 2001.
Description: An introduction to the anthropological study of Maya people in Southern Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize. The course focuses on certain parts of the Maya region, emphasizing selected themes and problems. We will explore regional history through the development of Maya studies and the historical transformations of Maya societies. These themes will be traced through studies of the Classic Maya, the Spanish conquest and colonization, indigenous resistance and rebellion, and recent pan-Maya activism.
(F,SP)
 
European Society  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 180 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Representative groups in historical and modern perspective. Rural-urban relationships and the dynamics of change.
(F,SP)
 
Themes in the Anthropology of the Middle East and Islam  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 181 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Anthropology 3 recommended.
Description: Cultures of the contemporary Near East, with special emphasis upon Arab populations.
(F,SP) Pandolfo
 
Topics in the Anthropological Study of Africa  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 183 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 and/or 114.
Description: The course will focus on African societies and cultures, as well as on issues relating to the history of Africanist anthropology. Images and constructs of Africa or Africans will thus be contextualized in relation to prevailing anthropological theories at different times, and in different regions of the continent.
(F,SP)
 
South Asia  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 184 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Cultural traditions, social organization, and social change, with an emphasis on India and Pakistan.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Social/Cultural Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 189 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Various topics covering current research theory, method; issues of social and cultural concern; culture change, conflict, and adaptation. May combine more than one subdiscipline of Anthropology.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology/Area  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 189A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 3 recommended.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special topics in cultural anthropology which meet the area requirement for the major.
(F,SP)
 
Senior Honors  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) H195A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of tutorial per week.
Prerequisites: Open only to honors students.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence.
Description: Systematic readings in history and modern theory, collection and analysis of research materials, and the preparation of an honors thesis. Group or individual tutorials.
(F,SP)
 
Senior Honors  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) H195B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of tutorial per week.
Prerequisites: Open only to honors students.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence.
Description: Systematic readings in history and modern theory, collection and analysis of research materials, and the preparation of an honors thesis. Group or individual tutorials.
(F,SP)
 
Undergraduate Seminar  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 196 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Seminar for the advanced study of the subject matter of a previously given upper division course, emphasizing reading and discussion.
(F,SP)
 
Fieldwork  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 197 [1-12 units]
Course Format: Three to thirty-six hours of tutorial or fieldwork per week.
Prerequisites: Upper-division status; consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Individual field experience sponsored by a faculty member; written reports required.
(F,SP)
 
Directed Group Study  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 198 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of directed group study per week.
Prerequisites: 60 units; good academic standing.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Undergraduate research by small groups.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Independent Study  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised independent study and research.
(F,SP)
 
Primate Behavior  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 202 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Primate Evolution  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 204 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Human Adaptation  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 209 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Physical Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 210 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description:
 
Discourse and of the Body  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 217 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This course juxtaposes discourse analysis and approaches to health and biomedicine, querying how ideologies of language and communication provide implicit foundations for work on health, disease, medicine, and the body and how biopolitical discourses and practices inform constructions of discourse.
(F,SP) Briggs
 
Topics in Medical Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 219 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Comparative study of mental illness and socially generated disease: psychiatric treatment, practitioners, and institutions.
 
Pre-Columbian Central America  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 221 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description:
 
Archaeology of the Pacific  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 226 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Subject matter will vary; current issues and debates in the archaeology of the Pacific, e.g., trade, exchange, colonization, maritime adaptations, etc.
 
Historical Archaeology Research  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 227 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing with some background in archaeology, or undergraduates who have taken 2, or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Historical archaeology seminar. Subject matter will vary from year to year.
 
Method  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 228 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Various topics and issues in the methods of archaeological analysis and interpretation: style, ceramics, architectural analysis, lithic analysis, archaeozoology, etc.
 
Archaeological Research Strategies  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 229A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Required for all first and second year graduate students in archaeology. Three hours of seminar discussion of major issues in the history and theory of archaeological research and practice (229A), and of the research strategies and design for various kinds of archaeological problems (229B). To be offered alternate semesters.
 
Archaeological Research Strategies  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 229B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Required for all first and second year graduate students in archaeology. Three hours of seminar discussion of major issues in the history and theory of archaeological research and practice (229A), and of the research strategies and design for various kinds of archaeological problems (229B). To be offered alternate semesters.
 
Writing the Field in Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 229C [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Description: This seminar is intended to guide students in the definition of a field within archaeology, from initial conceptualization to writing of a field statement, dissertation chapter, or review article.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Archaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 230 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description:
 
Advanced Topics in Bioarchaeology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 231 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: This advanced seminar course explores how we reconstruct past lifeways from archaeological skeletal remains. It deals with the skeletal biology of past populations, covering both the theoretical approaches and methods used in the analysis of skeletal and dental remains.
(F,SP) Agarwal
 
Advanced Topics in Bone Biology: Biocultural and Evolutionary Perspectives  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 232 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 127A or C103/Integrative Biology C142 and consent of instructor.
Description: This advanced seminar course will discuss influences on bone health and maintence from a unique biocultural and evolutionary perspective.
(F,SP) Agarwal
 
Special Topics in Museum Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 235 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Contemporary issues in museum studies from an anthropological perspective.
(F,SP)
 
Fundamentals of Anthropological Theory  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 240A [5 units]
Course Format: Four to six hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Enrollment is strictly limited to and required of all anthropology and medical anthropology graduate students who have not been advanced to candidacy.
Description: Anthropological theory and practice--following the rest of the world--have been undergoing important restructuring in the past decade. The course is organized to reflect this fact. We will begin by looking at recent debates about the nature and purpose of anthropology. This will provide a starting point for reading a series of classic ethnographies in new ways as well as examining some dimensions of the current research agenda in cultural anthropology.
 
Fundamentals of Anthropological Theory  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 240B [5 units]
Course Format: Four to six hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Enrollment is strictly limited to and required of all anthropology and medical anthropology graduate s tudents who have not been advanced to candidacy.
Description: Anthropological theory and practice--following the rest of the world--have been undergoing important restructuring in the past decade. The course is organized to reflect this fact. We will begin by looking at recent debates about the nature and purpose of anthropology. This will provide a starting point for reading a series of classic ethnographies in new ways as well as examining some dimensions of the current research agenda in cultural anthropology.
 
Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250 
Course Format: Two to three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description:
 
Psychological Anthropology  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250A [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Globalization  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250C [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Anthropology of Politics  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250E [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Religion  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250F [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Anthropology of Ethics  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250G [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Ethnographic Field Methods  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250J [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Classic Ethnography  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250N [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Dissertation Writing  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250R [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Tourism  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250V [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Special Topics  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 250X [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Topics in Science and Technology Studies  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C254 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course provides a strong foundation for graduate work in STS, a multidisciplinary field with a signature capacity to rethink the relationship among science, technology, and political and social life. From climate change to population genomics, access to medicines and the impact of new media, the problems of our time are simultaneously scientific and social, technological and political, ethical and economic. Also listed as Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C252, Science and Technology Studies C200, and History C250.
(F) Staff
 
Theories of Narrative  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C261 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This course examines a broad range of theories that elucidate the formal, structural, and contextual properties of narratives in relation to gestures, the body, and emotion; imagination and fantasy; memory and the senses; space and time. It focuses on narratives at work, on the move, in action as they emerge from the matrix of the everyday preeminently, storytelling in conversation--as key to folk genres--the folktale, the legend, the epic, the myth. Also listed as Folklore C261.
(F,SP)
 
Theories of Traditionality and Modernity  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C262A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit with different topic and different instructor.
Description: This seminar explores the emergence of notions of tradition and modernity and their reproduction in Eurocentric epistemologies and political formations. It uses work by such authors as Anderson, Butler, Chakrabarty, Clifford, Derrida, Foucault, Latour, Mignolo, Pateman, and Poovey to critically reread foundational works published between the 17th century and the present--along with philosophical texts with which they are in dialogue--in terms of how they are imbricated within and help produce traditionalities and modernities. Also listed as Folklore C262A.
(F)
 
Theories of Traditionality and Modernity  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C262B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit with different topic and different instructor.
Description: This seminar explores the emergence of notions of tradition and modernity and their reproduction in Eurocentric epistemologies and political formations. It uses work by such authors as Anderson, Butler, Chakrabarty, Clifford, Derrida, Foucault, Latour, Mignolo, Pateman, and Poovey to critically reread foundational works published between the 17th century and the present--along with philosophical texts with which they are in dialogue--in terms of how they are imbricated within and help produce traditionalities and modernities. Also listed as Folklore C262B.
(SP)
 
Semantics  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 270A [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Description: Formerly 270A and 271A-271B.
 
Fundamentals of Language in Context  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 270B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: Intensive introduction to the study of language as a cultural system and speech as socially embedded communicative practice. This is the core course for students wishing to take further coursework in linguistic anthropology.
 
Science and Technology Studies Research Seminar  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) C273 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This course will cover methods and approaches for students considering professionalizing in the field of STS, including a chance for students to workshop written work. Also listed as Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C273, Science and Technology Studies C250, and History C251.
(SP) Staff
 
Seminars in Area Studies  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 280 
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Courses will vary from year to year. See Departmental Internal Catalogue for detailed descriptions of course offerings for each semester.
 
Africa  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 280B [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
South Asia  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 280C [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
China  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 280D [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Special Topics in Area Studies  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 280X [4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Survey of Anthropological Research  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 290 [1 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture every other week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Required each term of all registered graduate students prior to their advancement to Ph.D. candidacy.
 
Supervised Research  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 296A [2-12 units]
Course Format: Variable units for field research per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Practice in original field research under staff supervision. One unit of credit for every four hours of work in the field.
 
Supervised Research  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 296B [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of consultation per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Analysis and write-up of field materials.
 
Directed Reading  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 298 [1-8 units]
Course Format: One to eight hours of conference per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Individual conferences intended to provide directed reading in subject matter not covered by available seminar offerings.
 
Directed Research  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 299 [1-12 units]
Course Format: Two to eight hours of conference per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Individual conferences to provide supervision in the preparation of an original research paper or dissertation.
 
Professional Training: Teaching  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 301 [1-6 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar and eight hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 units.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Group consultation with instructor. Supervised training with instructor on teaching undergraduates.
 
Graduate Pedagogy Seminar  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 375 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Formerly Anthropology 300
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Training in both the logistics and the pedagogical issues of undergraduate teaching.
(F,SP) Agrawal
 
Individual Study for Doctoral Students  --  Anthropology  (ANTHRO) 602 [1-12 units]
Course Format: One to eight hours of consultation per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: In preparation for Ph.D. examinations. Individual study in consultation with adviser. Intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D. May not be used for unit or residence requirements for the degree.
 
Freshman Seminars  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 24 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39 
Course Format: Seminar format.
Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sophomores.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39A [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39B [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39C [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39D [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39E [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39F [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39G [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39H [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39I [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39J [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39K [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39L [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39M [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39N [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39O [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39P [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39Q [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39R [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39S [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39T [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39U [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39V [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39W [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39X [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39Y [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 39Z [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Sophomore Seminar  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 84 [1,2 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks. Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five weeks.
Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-grade basis.
Description: Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.
(F,SP)
 
Special Group Study  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 98 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of directed group study per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: This is a special topics course intended to fulfill the individual interests of students, and provide a vehicle for professors to instruct students based on new and innovative developments in the field of architecture.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Berkeley Connect  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 98BC [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.
(F,SP)
 
Fundamentals of Architectural Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 100A [6 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture, six hours of studio, and two hours of computer graphics laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: ED 11A-11B. Must be taken in sequence.
Description: Introductory courses in the design of buildings. Problems emphasize conceptual strategies of form and space, site relationships and social, technological and environmental determinants.
100A focuses on the conceptual design process.
100B stresses tectonics, materials, and energy considerations. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings and field trips.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Fundamentals of Architectural Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 100B [6 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture, six hours of studio, and two hours of computer graphics laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: ED 11A-11B. Must be taken in sequence.
Description: Introductory courses in the design of buildings. Problems emphasize conceptual strategies of form and space, site relationships and social, technological and environmental determinants.
100A focuses on the conceptual design process.
100B stresses tectonics, materials, and energy considerations. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings and field trips.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Architectural Design III  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 100C [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Description: This is a studio course in architectural design. Students work on individual and group design projects that build on topics from Architecture 100B with additional integration of conditions pertinent to architectural production that may include architectural precedents, context, landscape and urban issues, envelope, performance, structure, and tectonics in the design of buildings.
(F,SP)
 
Architectural Design IV  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 100D [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Description: Students work on individual and/or group design projects that build on topics from previous studios with additional integration of conditions pertinent to architectural production that may include architectural precedents, context, landscape and urban issues, envelope, structure, and tectonics in the design of buildings. It may also include relevent and pertinent social, cultural, and technological issues facing architecture and design.
(F,SP)
 
Case Studies in Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 101 [5 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and five hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 100A-100B.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Problems in the design of buildings of intermediate complexity. Each section deals with a selected topic and concentrates on developing conceptual strategies in the analysis and design of buildings: internal spatial relationships, material, form, tectonics, social and environmental considerations and built landscapes. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Capstone Project Preparation Seminar  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 102A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Architecture 100A, Architecture 100B.
Description: This course is a course in architectural research methods with an emphasis on collaborative work. Students will work on individual facets of a collective topic of critical importance to the contemporary discipline of architecture within areas of faculty expertise. These include: architectural history and theory, structures, materials and methods of construction, building performance, energy and environment, and social factors and human behavior in architecture and the environment. The goal of Capstone Preparation is to develop a coherent research proposal that will be used as a topic for the Capstone Project course taken the following semester.
(F)
 
Architecture Capstone Project  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 102B [5 units]
Course Format: Four hours of seminar and four hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: Architecture 102A
Description: Through individual and collective efforts, students will address topics selected in the previous semester under the guidance of faculty mentors. Topics in the field which may serve as a basis for capstone projects include: the history and theory of architecture; structures; the materials and methods of construction; building performance; energy and the environment; and social factors and human behavior. This course is aimed at students who wish to strengthen their understanding of the research methods used by the discipline of architecture and related disciplines (e.g., engineering or history), and is not solely design oriented.
(SP)
 
Deep Green Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 105 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Completion of a minimum of one design studio, two studios preferred.
Description: This course explores the issues and practices of green architectural design through critical readings of seminal and current texts, lectures, films, field trips and projects that use both design and analysis as means of inquiry.The course examines varied approaches to sustainable design including using nature and wilderness as models, biophilia, biomimicry, material sources and reuse, accounting systems such as LEED, Zero Net Carbon and the 2030 Challenge, and the Living Building Challenge.
(F,SP) Ubbelohde
 
Introduction to the Practice of Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 107 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly 120
Description: Introduction to the business of architecture including client, developer and contractor relations, design proposals, competitions, and other marketing approaches as well as ethical issues of professional practice.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Architectural Internship  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 108 [5 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture/seminar per week for fifteen weeks and an additional sixteen hours of internship per week for ten of those weeks.
Prerequisites: 100B or consent of instructor.
Formerly 128
Description: An intensive and structured exposure to the professional practice, using the resources of practicing architects' offices as the "laboratory." The seminar discussion focus on understanding how design happens, how projects are managed and how buildings are constructed.
(SP) Comerio
 
Special Topics in Architectural Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 109 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Selected topics in the theories and conceopts of architectural design. For current offerings, see department website.
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 109A [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
 --  Architecture  (ARCH) 109X [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
The Social and Cultural Basis of Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 110AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/forum and one and one-half hours of discussion per week.
Description: This course focuses on the significance of the physical environment for citizens and future design professionals. This course is an introduction to the field of human-environment studies, taught from an American Cultures perspective. Its objectives include: 1) being able to use the concepts in person-environment relations, 2) understanding how these concepts vary by subculture, primarily Anglo-, Hispanic-, and Chinese-American, 3) learning to use the methodological skills needed to conduct architectural programming and evaluation research, 4) thinking critically about the values embedded in design and the consequences for people, their behavior, and feelings.
(F) Cranz
 
Housing: An International Survey  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 111 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Introduction to international housing from the Architectural and City Planning perspective. Housing issues (social, cultural, and policy) ranging from micro-scale (house) to macro-scale (city) presented with a comparison of housing situations in developed and developing countries.
(SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in the Social and Cultural Basis of Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 119 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of seminar/lecture per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Selected topics in the social and cultural basis of design. For current offerings, see departmental website.
(F,SP)
 
Principles of Computer Aided Architectural Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 122 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one and one-half hours of supervised laboratory sessions per week.
Formerly 132
Description: This course introduces students to Architecture's New Media; why and how computers are being used in architecture, and what are their current and expected impacts on the discipline and practice of architecture. Topics include presentation and re-presentation (including sketching, drafting, modeling, animating, and rendering); generating design solutions (including generative systems, expert systems, genetic algorithms, and neural networks); evaluation and prediction (using examples from structures, energy, acoustics, and human factors); and the future uses of computers in architectural design (including such topics as construction automation, smart buildings, and virtual environments). The laboratories introduce students to REVIT, a state-of-the-art architectural software, including drafting, modeling, rendering, and for building information modeling. This course is co-listed with 222.
(F) Staff
 
Workshop in Designing Virtual Places  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 127 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar and one and one-half hours of supervised laboratory sessions per week.
Description: This course introduces students to designing web-accessible, Multi User, Virtual Environments (MUVEs), inhabited through avatars. Such worlds are used in video games and web-based applications, and are assuming their role as alternative 'places' to physical spaces, where people shop, learn, are entertained, and socialize. Virtual worlds are designed according to the same principles that guide the design of physical spaces, with allowances made for the absence of gravity and other laws of nature. The course combines concepts from architecture, film studies, and video game design. It uses a game engine software and a modeling software to build, test, and deploy virtual worlds.
(SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in Digital Design Theories and Methods  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 129 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture/seminar per unit per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Topics cover advanced and research-related issues in digital design and New Media, related to architecture. For current offerings, see department website.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Architectural Design Theory and Criticism  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 130 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Open to upper division undergraduates.
Formerly 130A
Description: This class introduces students to the history and practice of design theory from the late 19th century to the present, with emphasis on developments of the last four decades. Readings and lectures explore specific constellations of theory and practice in relation to changing social and historical conditions. The course follows the rise of modernist design thinking, with particular emphasis on the growing influence of technical rationality across multiple fields in the post World War II period. Systematic approaches based in cybernetics and operations research (amongst others) are examined in the context of wider attempts to develop a science of design. Challenges to modernist design thinking, through advocacy planning and community-based design, the influence of social movements and countercultures, and parallel developments in postmodernism within and beyond architecture, provide the critical background for consideration of recent approaches to design theory, including those informed by developments in digital media and technology, environmental and ecological concerns, questions surrounding the globalization of architectural production, and the development of new materials.
(F,SP) Crysler
 
Architectures of Globalization: Contested Spaces of Global Culture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 133 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/seminar per week.
Prerequisites: This course is open to all graduate students and upper division undergraduates.
Description: This seminar examines the relationship between architecture and the processes associated with globalization. The social and spatial changes connected to the global economic restructuring of the last four decades are explored in relation to disctinctive national conditions and their connection to historical forces such as colonization and imperialism. Theoretical arguments about international urban political economy, uneven development, deindustrialization, and the growth of tourism and service industries, are grounded in specific urban and architectural contexts. Case studies explore issues such as urban entrepreneurialism and the branding of cities and nationstates; heritage practices and the postcolonial politics of place; border cities, and the urbanism of transnational production; cities, terrorism, and the global architecture of security; critical regionalism, localism, and other responses to debates on place and placelessness. Readings and class discussions examine course themes in a comparative framework and consider their implications for architectural design, education, and professional practice.
(F,SP) Crysler
 
The Literature of Space  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 136 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: The concept of space as it is applied to the fields of architecture, geography and urbanism can be understood as a barometer of the condition that we call "modernity." This course explores connections between the larger cultural frameworks of the past century, and the idea of space as it has been perceived, conceived and lived during this period. Readings include essays from the disciplines of philosophy, geography, architecture, landscape, and urbanism, and short works of fiction that illustrate and elucidate the spatial concepts. The readings are grouped according to themes that form the foundation for weekly seminar discussions. Chronological and thematic readings reveal the force of history upon the conceptualization of space, and its contradictions.
(F) Stoner
 
Special Topics in Architectural Design Theory and Criticism  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 139 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics cover contemporary and historical issues in architectural design theory and criticism. For current offerings, see department website.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics: Design Theories and Methods  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 139X [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: 130.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Energy and Environment  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 140 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of discussion/laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Physics or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Description: This course provides undergraduates and graduates with an introduction to issues of physical building performance including building thermodynamics, daylighting, and solar control. The course presents the fundamentals of building science while recongnizing the evolving nature of building technologies, energy efficiency, ecology, and responsible design. The course begins with a detailed explication of the thermal properties of materials, heat transfer through building assemblies, balance point temperature, solar geometry, and shading analysis. Students apply these principles later in the course to a design project. The latter part of the course also provides a survey of broader building science topics including mechanical system design, microclimate, and current developments in energy-efficient design.
(SP) Benton, Brager
 
Sustainability Colloquium  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 142 [1,2 units]
Course Format: One and one-half hours of seminar per week.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Presentations on a variety of topics related to sustainability, offering perspectives from leading practioners: architectural designers, city planners, consultants, engineers, and researchers. Students can enroll for one unit (required attendance plus reading) or two units (with additional writing assignments.
(F) Brager
 
Introduction to Acoustics  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 144 [1 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/discussion per week for five weeks.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: This course focuses on what architects need to know about acoustics. The first part deals with the fundamentals of acoustics including how sound levels are described and measured, and human response to sound. The course then covers building acoustics, mechanical equipment noise and vibration control, office acoustics, design of sound amplification systems, and environmental acoustics.
(F) Salter
 
Special Topics in Energy and Environment  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 149 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture/seminar per unit per week.
Prerequisites: 140 and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special topics include climatic design, heating, ventilating, air-conditioning systems, lighting, and acoustics. For current offerings, see department website.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Structures  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 150 [4 units]
Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture and thirty hours of discussion per semester.
Prerequisites: Physics 8A.
Description: Study of forces, materials, and structural significance in the design of buildings. Emphasis on understanding the structural behavior of real building systems.
(F) Black
 
Design and Computer Analysis of Structure  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 154 [3 units]
Course Format: Thirty hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory per semester.
Prerequisites: 150.
Description: Design and analysis of whole structural building systems with the aid of finite element analytical methods. Advanced structural concepts explored in a laboratory environment.
(SP) Black
 
Structure, Construction, and Space  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 155 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours lecture/seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 150.
Description: In profound buildings, the structural system, construction materials, and architectural form work together to create an integrated work of art. Current practice segregates these three areas by assigning separate and rigid roles to 1) an engineer, 2) a contractor, and 3) an architect. The goal of this class is to blur these traditional boundaries and erase the intellectual cleft though hands-on experience. Students are given weekly assignments which focus on one or more of the three areas. They may be asked to analyze a structure, to construct something from actual materials, or research a case study and present it to the class. Each assignment to geared to help students integrate construction and structural issues into their architectural design, so that they can maintain control of the entire design process.
(F) Black
 
Special Topics in Building Structures  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 159 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture/seminar per unit per week.
Prerequisites: 150 and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special topics such as experimental structures and architural preservation. For current offerings, see department website.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Construction  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 160 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Description: This introduction to the materials and processes of construction takes architecture from design to realization. The course will cover four material groups commonly used in two areas of the building assembly (structure and envelope): wood, concrete, steel, and glass. You will understand choices available and how materials are conventionally used. By observing construction, you'll see how our decisions affect the size of materials, connections, and where they are assembled. Architects must understand not only conventions, but also the potential in materials, so we will also study unusual and new developments.
(SP) Black
 
Special Topics in Construction Materials  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 169 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: 160 and consent of instructor.
Formerly 169X
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: For current offerings, see department website.
(F,SP)
 
An Historical Survey of Architecture and Urbanism  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 170A [4 units]
Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture and 15 hours of seminar/discussion per semester.
Description: The first part of this sequence studies the ancient and medieval periods; the second part studies the period since 1400; the aim is to look at architecture and urbanism in their social and historical context.
(F,SP) Staff
 
An Historical Survey of Architecture and Urbanism  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 170B [4 units]
Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture and 15 hours of seminar/discussion per semester.
Description: The first part of this sequence studies the ancient and medieval periods; the second part studies the period since 1400; the aim is to look at architecture and urbanism in their social and historical context.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Case Studies in Modern Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 173 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 170A-170B and consent of instructor.
Formerly 173A
Description: This course examines developments in design, theory, graphic representation, construction technology, and interior programming through case studies of individual buildings. Our survey technique will be highly focused rather than panoptic. Each lecture will delve deeply into one or two buildings to examine program, spatial organization, graphic representation, critical building details, construction technology, and the relationship of the case study building with regard to other contemporary structures and the architect's overall body of work. From this nucleus, we will spiral outward to consider how the case study is embedded within a constellation of social and economic factors crucial to its design and physical realization. This survey of "modernism's built discourses" provides multiple perspectives on the variety of architectural propositions advanced to express the nature of modernity as a way of life.
 
Architecture in Depression and War  --  Architecture  (ARCH) C174 [4 units]
Course Format: Three to four hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: The Great Depression and World War II are arguably the two most influential events for the development of the built environment in the 20th century. Not only did they alter the socio-economic and political landscape on which architecture and urban planning depend, but they also led to technological innovations and vital debates about the built environment. This course examines the 1930's and 1940's topically, studying the work of the New Deal, corporate responses to the Depression and war, the important connections between architecture and advertising, the role of the Museum of Modern Art in the promotion of Modernism, the concept of the ideal house, and key tests, theories, and projects from the period. Also listed as American Studies C111A.
(SP) Shanken
 
Introduction to Architectural Theory 1945-Present  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 175 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Open to upper division undergraduates and graduate students.
Description: This seminar provides an introduction to architectural theory since 1945, with emphasis on developments over the last three decades. Class readings and discussions explore the post-World War II crisis within modernism, postmodernism within and beyond architectural culture, and more recent developments around issues such as rapid urbanization, sustainability, the politics of cultural identity, and globalization. Transformations in architectural theory are examined in relation to historical forces such as the economy, the growth and transformation of cities, and the changing relationship between design professions and disciplines. The influences of digital media, new materials and production techniques on architectural education and practice are explored and the implications for architectural theory assessed. Key issues are anchored in case studies of buildings, urban spaces, and the institutions and agents of architectural culture.
(F,SP) Crysler
 
American Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 176 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: The first half of this course surveys American architecture from Colonial times to contemporary trends. Stylistic and spatial analysis is linked with the socioeconomic, political, and environmental influences on architecture, issues on originality, American exceptionalism, the influence from abroad, regionalism, and the role of technology. The second half delves more deeply into the history of specific building types--house, church, museum, library--grafting the earlier themes onto a history of modern institutions as they took shape in the United States.
(F,SP) Shanken
 
Visionary Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 178 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This course explores architectural visions as historical windows, examining them from a number of angles. Using a variety of case studies drawn from different media (architectural theory, film, advertisements, architectural projects, and so on) and periods (turn of the century, the Modern Movement, Depression, World War II, 1960's, etc,) it provides a sampling of possibilities and models for the final student project, an in-depth, original research paper. Several themes thread their way through the course, including the role of the "unbuilt" in architectural practice; the uses of the future in the construction of national and personal identities, cultural narratives, and modern mythologies; and the importance of the future as cliche, and the role of play in cultural production.
(F,SP) Shanken
 
Special Topics in the History of Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 179 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 170A-170B and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special topics in Architectural History. For current section offerings, see departmental announcement.
(F,SP)
 
Prison  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 180AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: Taking a broad interdisciplinary approach, this course embraces the longue duree of critical prison studies, questioning the shadows of normality that cloak mass incarceration both across the globe and, more particularly, in the contemporary United States. This course thus explores a series of visceral, unsettling juxtapositions: "freedom" and "slavery"; "citizenship" and "subjugation"; "marginalization" and "inclusion", in each case explicating the ways that story making, political demagoguery, and racial, class, and sexual inequalities have wrought an untenable social condition. Also listed as Ethnic Studies 181AC and Legal Studies 185AC.
(SP) Hilden, Simon, Stoner, Robinson
 
Special Group Study  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 198 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Studies developed to meet needs.
(F,SP)
 
Berkeley Connect  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 198BC [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Berkeley Connect is a mentoring program, offered through various academic departments, that helps students build intellectual community. Over the course of a semester, enrolled students participate in regular small-group discussions facilitated by a graduate student mentor (following a faculty-directed curriculum), meet with their graduate student mentor for one-on-one academic advising, attend lectures and panel discussions featuring department faculty and alumni, and go on field trips to campus resources. Students are not required to be declared majors in order to participate.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the section on Academic Policies-Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Enrollment is restricted by regulations in the General Catalog. Studies developed to meet individual needs.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Architecture Studio 1  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 200A [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Introductory course in architectural design and theories for graduate students. Problems emphasize the major format, spatial, material, tectonic, social, technological, and environmental determinants of building form. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to Architecture Studio 2  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 200B [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Description: Introductory course in architectural design and theories for graduate students. Problems emphasize the major format, spatial, material, tectonic, social, technological, and environmental determinants of building form. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Representational Practice in Architectural Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 200C [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: 200C must be taken in conjunction with 200A.
Description: This course will address three distinct levels of representational practice in architectural design: 1) cultivate an understanding of the foundational discourse and diversity of approaches to architectural representation; 2) develop a fluency in the canonical methods found in architectural practice; 3) encourage the development of a personal relationship to forms of modeling and formats of drawing.
(F) Steinfeld
 
Architecture & Urbanism Design Studio  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 201 [5 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 100A-100B or 200A-200B.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: The design of buildings or communities of advanced complexity. Each section deals with a specific topic such as housing, public and institutional buildings, and local or international community development. Studio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field trips.
(F,SP)
 
Graduate Option Studio  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 202 [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Description: Focused design and research as the capstone project for graduate students.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Final Project Preparation Seminar: Thesis  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 203 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
Formerly 209D
Credit option: Students may take 203/204 or 203/205 to complete the studio requirements.
Description: Specific research topics organized to prepare students for their final project studio or thesis.
(F,SP)
 
Final Research Seminar  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 203A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
Formerly 203
Credit option: Students may take 203/204 or 203/205 to complete the studio requirements.
Description: Specific research topics organized to prepare students for their final project studio or thesis.
(F,SP)
 
Final Project Studio: Studio Thesis Option  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 204 [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Formerly 202A
Description: Focused design research as the capstone project for graduate students.
 
Thesis Seminar  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 204A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: Focused design research as the capstone project for graduate students.
(F)
 
Thesis Studio  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 204B [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Formerly 204
Description: Focused design research as the capstone project for graduate students.
(SP)
 
Final Project Studio: Independent Thesis Option  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 205 [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of Chair of Graduate Advisors during fall semester.
Formerly 202B
Description:
(F)
 
Studio One, Fall  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 205A [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of Chair or graduate advisors during fall semester.
Formerly 205
Description: This course is a one-year, post-professional design studio intended for those students who have a professional architecture degree and wish to explore current design issues in a stimulating, rigorous, and highly experimental studio setting.
(F)
 
Studio One, Spring  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 205B [5 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of chair or graduate advisors.
Formerly 205
Description: This course is the second semester of a one-year, post-professional studio intended for those students who have a professional architecture degree and wish to explore current design issues in a stimulating, rigorous, and highly experimental studio setting.
(SP)
 
Architecture Lectures Colloquium  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 207A [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This course accompanies the required introductory design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the first in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program. Students will attend all Wednesday evening lectures of the College of Environmental Design lecture series. Every third week, they will meet with the instructor for a one-hour discussion.
(F,SP)
 
Architecture Research Colloquium  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 207B [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Co-requisite with Architecture 200B.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This course accompanies the second semester of the required introductory design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the second in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program. For a one-hour session each week, faculty in the department of architecture and other departments of the College of Environmental Design will present lectures on their research and design practice.
(SP)
 
Professional Practice Colloquium  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 207C [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This course accompanies the required comprehensive design studio in the three-year option of the Master of Architecture program. It is the third in a series of three one-unit colloquia, scheduled consecutively for the first three semesters of the program.
(F)
 
The Cultures of Practice  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 207D [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 201.
Description: The nature of architectural practice, how it has evolved and how it is changing in today's world is the theme of the class. The course considers how diverse cultures--both anthropological and professional--contribute to practice, and how the culture of practice evolves. The class has three five-week modules, devoted to the following themes: traditions of practice, research in the culture of the profession, and innovations in practice.
(SP) Comerio, Cranz
 
Introduction to Construction Law  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 208 [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar/discussion per week.
Description: The course introduces graduate students to legal and related professional practice issues that often arise during a design professional's career. Careful practitioners can avoid or mitigate many legal problems through vigilance and loss prevention techniques. Course topics include standard of care, business formation, contract analysis and negotiation, intellectual property rights, projects delivery models, insurance, and dispute resolution.
(SP) Sharafian
 
Special Topics in Architectural Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 209 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Second- or third-year graduate standing.
Formerly 209X
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Topics deal with major problems and current issues in architectural design. For current offerings, see departmental website.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Seminar in Architectural Theory  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 209A [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Current Issues in Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 209C [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of seminar per week.
Formerly 209D
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics: Architectural Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 209X [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Theory and Methods in the Social and Cultural Basis of Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 211 [3-4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week plus individual advising.
Prerequisites: 110 or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Explores a variety of theories which explain and document the relationship between humans and the environment they build; outlines the research methods appropriate to each theory.
(SP) Cranz
 
Body-Conscious Design: Shoes, Chairs, Rooms, and Beyond  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 212 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This seminar prepares students to evaluate and design environments from the point of view of how they interact with the human body. Tools and clothing modify that interaction. Semi-fixed features of the near environment, especially furniture, may have greater impact on physical well being and social-psychological comfort than fixed features like walls, openings, and volume. Today, designers can help redefine and legitimize new attitudes toward supporting the human body by, for example, designing for a wide range of postural alternatives and possibly designing new kinds of furniture. At the urban design scale, the senses of proprioception and kinesthetics can be used to shape architecture and landscape architecture. This course covers these topics with special emphasis on chair design and evaluation. The public health implications of a new attitude toward posture and back support are explored. The course heightens students' consciousness of their own and others' physical perceptions through weekly experiential exercises. Students produce three design exercises: shoe, chair, and a room interior.
(SP) Cranz
 
Landscape, Architecture, Infrastructure, and Urbanism  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 215 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This seminar aims to explore how the physical and conceptual understanding of landscape can enrich current forms of architectural and urban design practice. At the junction of landform, infrastructure, urban design, and architecture lies a rich field of possibilities that is increasingly superseding the narrower field of each of the disciplines by themselves. In the past century, contemporary culture and technology-automobiles, televisions, cell phones, and the internet have socially, culturally, environmentally, and physically reshaped the urban fabric, calling into question the very definition of urbanity. The course will explore the implications for public space in an era of increased security and risk mitigation and how designers may direct the various invisible forces which give form to the world around us.
(F,SP) Davids
 
The Sociology of Taste in Environmental Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 216 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 110, or consent of instructor.
Description: Taste is at work in the way we display our things as much as in the qualities of things themselves. A performance-oriented model of taste observes that objects fall into two broad categories: pragmatic (that support behavior) and symbolic (that identify a person). People visually organize these two categories of objects using both explicit and subconscious aesthetic rules to produce visually unified displays. Depending on how it is used, how it is placed in relation to other things, an object's meaning can vary. The display of taste is where objects take on--and shed--meanings, depending on how they are combined with one another. This seminar reviews the extensive body of 20th-century theory and empirical research on taste and considers the implications of theories about taste for design creation, design education, and for client-professional relations.
(F,SP) Cranz
 
Social Aspects of Housing Design: Mid-Rise Urbanism  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 217 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: The course explores strategies to bring coherence and continuity back to the city focusing on mid-rise, higher density urbanism and the potential and difficulties of this scale of urban fabric to contribute to the form of cities, without losing the potential of choice and diversity. The seminars are organized in case studies revolving around four cities: Amsterdam, Barcelona, Beijing, and New York. Design exercises parallel the case studies as a way to test and challenge the potentials of mid-rise urbanism.
(SP) Chow
 
Housing, Urbanization, and Urbanism: Design, Planning, and Policy Issues in Developing Countries  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 218 [4 units]
Course Format: One and one-half hours of lecture and one and one-half hours of seminar per week.
Description: This seminar is concerned with the study of housing, urbanization, and urbanism in developing countries, studying not only the physical landscapes of settlements, but also the social, economic, political, and cultural dimensions. This course's focus will be on housing, its lens will be their processes of urbanization, and its intent will be to investigate the space for action by the professionals of the "urban" in the arena of housing. While the emphasis of the course will be on the diverse trajectories of developing countries, "First World" experiences will also be used to illuminate the specific transnational connections and their use in the making of housing theory and policy. The seminar complements the series of lectures offered in 111 and City Planning 111.
(SP) AlSayyad
 
Special Topics in the Social and Cultural Basis of Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 219 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Topics include the sociology of taste, personal and societal values in design, participatory design, semantic ethnography, environments for special popultions such as the elderly, and building types such as housing, hospitals, schools, offices, and urban parks. For current offerings, see departmental website.
(F,SP)
 
Design and Housing in the Developing World  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 219A [3 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(SP) Staff
 
Graduate Seminar in Digital Design Theories and Methods  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 221 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Formerly 235
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This seminar is intended to help graduate students develop a coherent research agenda in the area of digital design theories and methods. In addition, it is intended to serve as a forum for the exchange of ideas (e.g., work in progress, potential directions for research, etc.) in the area of shared interest. The course provides students with a set of questions as guides, readings, and guest lectures.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Principles of Computer Aided Architectural Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 222 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: This course introduces students to Architecture's New Media; why and how computers are being used in architecture and what are their current and expected impacts on the discipline and practice of architecture. Topics include presentation and re-presentation (including sketching, drafting, modeling, animating, and rendering); generating design solutions (generative systems, expert systems,genetic algorithms, and neural networks); evaluation and prediction (using examples from structures, energy, acoustics, and human factors); and the future uses of computers in architectural design (including such topics as construction automation, smart buildings, and virtual environments). The laboratories introduce students to a REVIT, a state-of-the-art architectural software, including drafting, modeling, rendering, and building information modeling. This course is co-listed with 122. Graduate students will have a discussion section instead of the laboratory that 122 students undertake.
(F) Staff
 
Collaboration by Digital Design  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 226 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This project-based seminar studies the problem of multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural collaboration in the building industry. It employs two complementary approaches: 1) a theoretical approach, which examines the nature of collaboration in general and in architecture in particular, looks at the methods that have been used to foster and support it, and interrogates their advantages and shortcomings; and 2) a practical approach, which use a web-based multi-person design 'game' that allow students to play different roles (architect, clients, engineer, builder, etc.) while collaborating in the design of a building.
Offered alternate years. (F,SP) Staff
 
Workshop in Designing Virtual Places  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 227 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar and one and one half hours of supervised laboratory sessions per week.
Description: This course introduces students to designing web-accessible, Multi User, Virtual Environments (MUVEs), inhabited through avatars. Such worlds are used in video games and web-based applications, and are assuming their role as alternative 'places' to physical spaces, where people shop, learn, are entertained, and socialize. Virtual worlds are designed according to the same principles that guide the design of physical spaces, with allowances made for the absence of gravity and other laws of nature. The course combines concepts from architecture, film studies, and video game design. It uses a game engine software and a modeling software to build, test, and deploy virtual worlds.
(SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in Digital Design Theories and Methods  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 229 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: 210 or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Selected topics in digital design theories and methods. For current offerings, see departmental website.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Construction Law  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 229A [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Formerly 229F
Description:
(SP)
 
Advanced Architectural Design Theory and Criticism  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 230 [3 units]
Course Format: Forty-five hours of lecture/seminar per semester.
Prerequisites: 130A or consent of instructor.
Description: Seminar in the analysis and discussion of contemporary and historical issues in architectural design theory and criticism.
 
Research Methods in Architectural Design Theory and Criticism  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 231 [2 units]
Course Format: Thirty hours of lecture/seminar per semester.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Seminar in methods and use of research in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticism. Required for doctoral students in this study area.
 
Architectures of Globalization: Contested Spaces of Global Culture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 233 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: This course is open to all graduate students and upper division undergraduates.
Description: This seminar examines the relationship between architecture and the processes associated with globalization. The social and spatial changes connected to the global economic restructuring of the last four decades are explored in relation to distinctive national conditions and their connection to historical forces such as colonization and imperialism. Theoretical arguments about international urban political economy, uneven development, deindustrialization and the growth of tourism and service industries, are grounded in specific urban and architectural contexts. Case studies explore issues such as urban entrepreneurialism and the branding of cities and nation-states; heritage practices and the postcolonial politics of place; border cities, and the urbanism of transnational production; cities, terrorism and the global architecture of security; critical regionalism, localism and other responses to debates on place and placelessness. Readings and class discussions examine course themes in a comparative framework and consider their implications for architectural design, education and professional practice.
(F,SP) Crysler
 
The Literature of Space  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 236 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: The concept of space as it is applied to the fields of architecture, geography, and urbanism can be understood as a barometer of the condition that we call "modernity." This course explores connections between the larger cultural frameworks of the past century, and the idea of space as it has been perceived, conceived, and lived during this period. Readings include key essays from the disciplines of philosophy, geography, architecture, landscape, and urbanism, and short works of fiction that illustrate and elucidate the spatial concepts. The readings are grouped according to themes that form the foundation for weekly seminar discussions. Chronological and thematic readings reveal the force of history upon the conceptualization of space, and its contradictions.
(F) Stoner
 
Ulterior Speculation: Monographs and Manifestos  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 237 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: An examination and analysis of architectural manifestos and monographs from the first half of the 20th century to today. The class analyzes the possibilities and limits of grounding a discourse in practice as well as theory. The seminar complements thesis preparation or can serve as an introduction to critical thinking in architecture.
(F) Fernau
 
The Dialectic of Poetics and Technology  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 238 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Formerly 209A
Description: This seminar examines the relationship between technology and design philosophy in the work of architects through analysis of individual buildings within the cntext of the complete oeuvre and an examination of the architect's writings and lectures. The seminar poses the following questions: What is the role of technology in the design philosophy of the architect and how is this theoretical position established in the architect's writings, lectures, interviews? How is this position revealed through the work moves to the developing world? How is this position negotiated in the design and construction of an individual building? Is this a successful strategy for achieving technical performance? Is this a successful strategy for achieving a coherent theoretical statement? A series of lectures explores these questions in relation to the architect and a set of required readings introduces the work of the architect and explores the relationship between technology and design philosophy. Students choose one building to investigate in parallel with the methods and issues discussed in class. These studies are presented in class as completed and assembled for submission as a final project.
(F,SP) Ubbelohde
 
Special Topics in Architecture Design Theory and Criticism  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 239 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Selected topics in contemporary and historical architectural design theory and criticsm. For current offerings, see departmental website.
(F,SP)
 
Design and Computers  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 239A [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Special Topics: Design Theories and Methods  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 239X [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Advanced Study of Energy and Environment  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 240 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 140 or consent of instructor.
Description: Minimizing energy use is a cornerstone of designing and operating sustainable buildings, and attention to energy issues can often lead to greatly improved indoor environmental quality. For designers, using computer-based energy analysis tools are important not only to qualify for sustainability ratings and meet energy codes, but also to develop intuition about what makes buildings perform well. This course will present quantitative and qualitative methods for assessing energy performance during design of both residential and commercial buildings. Students will get hands-on experience with state-of-the-art software -- ranging from simple to complex -- to assess the performance of building components and whole-building designs.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Research Methods in Building Sciences  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 241 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Required for doctoral students in the area of environmental physics.
Brager
 
Sustainability Colloquium  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 242 [1,2 units]
Course Format: One and one-half hours of seminar per week.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Presentations on a variety of topics related to sustainability, offering perspectives from leading practitioners: architectural designers, city planners, consultants, engineers, and researchers. Students can enroll for one unit (required attendance plus reading) or two units (with additional assignments.
(F) Brager
 
Natural Cooling: Sustainable Design for a Warming Planet  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 243 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 140 or consent of instructor.
Description: Course focuses on zero- and no-energy climate responsive cooling strategies for both residential and commercial scale buildings. The course reviews designs and technologies that include low- and high-tech solutions, dynamic high performance facades, natural ventilation, and a range of other innovative cooling strategies. The course also explores the relationship between building design and operation, energy use, and climate change.
(F,SP) Brager
 
The Secret Life of Buildings  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 244 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This exploratory seminar addresses a secret life of buildings related to physical performance. Students examine architectural, lighting, and mechanical systems in existing buildings with attention to energy use, occupant well-being, and architectural spacemaking. The seminar applies a collection of measurement techniques, often involving novel approaches, to reveal operating patterns in the complex environment of contemporary buildings. The personal experience students gain in performing the evaluations contributes to the students' experiential base at a formative time. Analysis of data collected in the field and the comparison of these data to values given by simulation tools provides a foundation for understanding the more abstract tools and standards used by designers in practice. The juxtaposition of design intention and post-occupancy performance can be a powerful learning experience now, as well as preparation for evaluating building performance in the future.
(F,SP) Benton
 
Daylighting  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 245 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 140 or consent of instructor.
Description: This seminar introduces theories, technologies, design strategies and analytical methods of architectural daylighting, including issues of visual experience, integration with electrical lighting and energy use. The course provides foundation for intelligent daylighting design by developing frameworks for thinking about design, performance and tools. The work examines two archetypal daylighting conditions: a toplighted (roof-lighted) space and a side-lighted (window-lit) space with range of methods including readings, on-site observation and measurement, case studies, design exercises and analysis through models and simulation. This is a graduate seminar: attendance, pin-ups, readings and engaged participation are required each week.
(F,SP) Ubbelohde
 
Special Topics in the Physical Environment in Buildings  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 249 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: 140
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description:
(F,SP) Staff
 
Seismic Design and Construction  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 253 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 150.
Description: Contemporary design and construction techniques for improving the performance of new and existing buildings in earthquakes. Topics will include 1) basic principles of seismic design and building performance, 2) retrofit of existing buildings and evaluation techniques, 3) design and planning for disaster recovery and rebuilding. The course will use Bay Area and campus buildings as case studies.
(F) Comerio
 
Structure, Construction, and Space  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 255 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 150.
Description: In profound buildings, the structural system, construction materials, and architectural form work together to create an integrated work of art. Current practice segregates these three areas by assigning separate and rigid roles to 1) an engineer, 2) a contractor, and 3) an architect. The goal of this class is to blur these traditional boundaries and erase the intellectual cleft through hands-on experience. Students are given weekly assignments which focus on one or more of the three areas. They may be asked to analyze a structure, to construct something from actual materials or research a case study and present it to the class. Each assignment is geared to help students integrate construction and structural issues into their architectural design so that they can maintain control of the entire design process.
(F,SP) Black
 
Structural Design in the Studio  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 256 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 150 or equivalent.
Description: Teaching structures to architecture students on their own turf: in a design studio. The course is organized around weekly desk reviews and assignments for students enrolled in a 201 design studio or thesis. The reviews and assignments focus on the structural issues of the students' projects. A central goal of the course is to help students understand structural issues as they relate to design and to help them become comfortable with structural concepts so that they can begin to integrate the structure and architecture. The course can be taken for 1 unit, 2 units, or 3 units depending on the amount of time a student wishes to commit to it. A final report showing the evolution of each student's project with clear reference to how structural understanding influenced design decisions is required of all students regardless of units taken. Enrollment strictly limited to 10 students.
(SP) Black
 
Special Topics in Building Structures  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 259 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Selected topics in building structures such as experimental structures and architectural preservation. For current offerings, see departmental website.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics: Building Structures  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 259X [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week.
Description: Special topics such as experimental structures and architectural preservation.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to Construction, Graduate Level  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 260 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
Description: This course addresses the methods and materials of construction. While students will not be experts at the end of the semester, the course should give students the confidence to feel comfortable on a construction site or when designing a small building for a studio. The course will focus on four major territories: structural materials, building envelope, built elements such as stairs and cabinets, and costs, labor conditions, conventional practices, and the regulatory environments that control design.
(F) Buntrock
 
Architecture in Detail  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 262 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This seminar will reevaluate the material nature of buildings by studying and understanding construction details and the new technologies that are revolutionizing design construction and labor relations in architecture.
(F) Davids
 
Off-Site Fabrication: Opportunities and Evils  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 264 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 160, 260 or consent of instructor.
Description: This seminar looks at the implications of off-site fabrication in architecture: consistent, protected environments; worker efficiency and safety; coordination of trades; cheaper, semi-skilled labor; construction periods shortened; and completion dates more predictable. Off-site fabrication can allow for increased refinement and trial assemblies. However, it may also create monotonous sameness when the processes and results are not considered with care.
(F) Buntrock
 
Japanese Craft and Construction  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 265 [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 150, 160, or consent of instructor.
Description: The class addresses the role craft and construction play in Japanese architecture and applies these lessons to the evaluation of an exemplary recent building having unusual technical features. Buildings are expressions of theoretic and technical intent and a response to cultural and economic forces; Japanese architecture is regarded as particularly innovative. In studying a system where there is an emphasis on collaboration, students also see the values of North American systems of architectural production.
(SP) Buntrock
 
Special Topics in Construction and Materials  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 269 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Selected topics in construction and materials. For current offerings, see departmental website.
 
Special topics: Construction and Materials  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 269X [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Selected topics such as construction management implementation and geological hazards to construction. For current section offerings see department web site.
(F,SP) Staff
 
History of Modern Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 270 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course examines developments in design, theory, graphic representation, construction technology, and interior programming through case studies of individual buildings. Each lecture will delve deeply into one or sometimes two buildings to examine program, spatial organization, critical building details, and the relationship of the case study building with regard to other parallel works and the architect's overall body of work.
Castillo
 
Methods in Historical Research and Criticism in Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 271 [4 units]
Course Format: Sixty hours of lecture/seminar per semester.
Prerequisites: Doctoral candidate or consent of instructor.
Description:
(SP)
 
Case Studies in Modern Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 273 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 170A-170B and consent of instructor.
Description: This course examines developments in design, theory, graphic representation, construction technology, and interior programming through case studies of individual buildings. Our survey technique will be highly focused rather than panoptic. Each lecture will delve deeply into one or two buildings to examine program, spatial organization, graphic representation, critical building details, construction technology, and the relationship of the case study building with regard to other contemporary structures and the "architect's overall body of work". From this nucleus, we will spiral outward to consider how the case study is embedded within a constellation of social and economic factors crucial to its design and physical realization. This survey of "modernism's built discourses" provides multiple perspectives on the variety of architectural propositions advanced to express the nature of modernity as a way of life.
 
Introduction to Architectural Theory 1945 - Present  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 275 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: The course is open to upper division undergraduates and graduate students.
Description: This seminar provides an introduction to architectural theory since 1945, with emphasis on developments over the last three decades. Class readings, and discussions explore the post-World War II crisis within modernism, postmodernism within and beyond architectural culture, and more recent developments around issues such as rapid urbanization, sustainability, the politics of cultural identity and globalization. Transformations in architectural theory are examined in relation to historical forces such as the economy, the growth and transformation of cities, and the changing relationship between design professions and disciplines. The influences of digital media, new materials and production techniques on architectural education and practice are explored and the implications for architectural theory assessed. Key issues are anchored in case studies of buildings, urban spaces, and the institutions and agents or architectural culture.
(F,SP) Crysler
 
Spaces of Recreation and Leisure, 1850-2000  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 276 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: A reading and research seminar surveying the building types, social relations, and cultural ideas of recreation in the American city, including the tensions between home, public, and commerical leisure settings.
Offered alternate years. (SP) Groth
 
Visionary Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 278 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 170A-170B and cosent of instructor.
Description: This course explores architectural visions as historical windows, examining them from a number of angles. Using a variety of cases studies drawn from different media (architectural theory, film, advertisements, architectural projects, and so on) and periods (turn of the century, the Modern Movement, Depression, World War II, 1860's, etc.) It provides a sampling of possibilities and models for the final student project, an in-depth, original research paper. Several themes thread their way through the course, including the role of the "unbuilt" in architectural history and architectural practice; the uses of the future in the construction of national and personal identities, cultural narratives, and modern mythologies; the importance of the future as cliche, and the role of play in cultural production.
(F,SP) Shanken
 
Special Topics in the History of Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 279 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Selected topics in the history of architecture. For current offerings, see department website.
 
History of Housing  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 279D [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
 
Methods of Inquiry in Architectural Research  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 281 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture/discussion per week.
Prerequisites: M.S. or Ph.D. standing or consent of instructor.
Description: This is the introductory course in methods of inquiry in architecture research to be required of all entering Ph.D. students in all areas of the program. The purpose is to train students in predissertation and prethesis research strategies, expose them to variety of inquiry methods including the value of scholarly research, the nature of evidence, critical reading as content analysis and writing, presenting and illustrating scholarship in the various disciplines of architecture.
(F) Staff
 
Special Group Study  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 298 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: May be repeated for credit up to unit limitation.
Grading option: Sections 1-3 to be graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Sections 4-10 to be graded on a letter grade basis.
Description: Special group studies on topics to be introduced by instructor or students.
(F,SP)
 
Individual Study and Research for Master's and Doctoral Students  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 299 [1-12 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Individual studies including reading and individual research under the supervision of a faculty adviser and designed to reinforce the student's background in areas related to the proposed degree.
(F,SP)
 
Seminar in the Teaching of Architecture  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 375 [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Formerly Architecture 300
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This class is intended for first-time graduate student instructors, especially those working in studio and lab settings. The class covers a range of issues that normally come up when teaching, offers suggestions regarding how to work well with other graduate student instructors and faculty, and how to manage a graduate student instructor's role as both student and teacher. The greatest benefit of this class comes from the opportunity to explore important topics together. Using a relatively light, but provocative set of readings, the seminar will explore the issues raised each week. There will be one assignment intended to help students explore their own expectations as educators.
(F) Staff
 
Individual Study for Doctoral Students  --  Architecture  (ARCH) 602 [1-8 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D. This course may not be used for units or residence requirements for the doctoral degree.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to Visual Studies: Word and Image  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 180A [4 units]
Course Format: Thirty hours lecture and 90 hours studio per semester.
Prerequisites: Environmental Design 11A-11B or consent of instructor; A is prerequisite to B.
Description: Projects in graphic form, color, and word-image relationships.
 
Introduction to Visual Studies: Word and Image  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 180B [4 units]
Course Format: Thirty hours lecture and 90 hours studio per semester.
Prerequisites: Environmental Design 11A-11B or consent of instructor; A is prerequisite to B.
Description: Projects in graphic form, color, and word-image relationships.
 
Introduction to Photography  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 181 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Description: This course will use the visual vocabulary of the digital camera as a way to record, respond and create. Students will gain technical mastery over the camera, image workflow, image editing, printing, and other forms of presentation. Exposure to the history and to the most current trends of the medium will broaden students' understanding of how photographs speak. Topics of discussion will include lighting, timing, creating a sense of place, and building a narrative structure.
(F,SP)
 
Selected Topics: Word and Image  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 185 
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Environmental Design 11A-11B.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Studio sections in areas such as calligraphy, the history of letter forms, and typography. For current offerings see the departmental announcement.
 
Visual Autobiography  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) C185A [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Since visual and literary studies have historically been viewed as separate disciplines, we will use theories from both to study those forms of self-representation that defy disciplinary boundaries, or what we call "visual autobiography." The course aims to help students become conversant with the elements of alphabetic literacy (reading and writing) and visual literacy (observing and making) in order to develop a third distinctive textual/visual literacy. Also listed as English C143V, Undergrad Interdisciplinary Studies C135, and American Studies C174.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics: Word and Image  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 185X [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Selected Topics: Photography  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 186 
Course Format:
Prerequisites: 181.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Studio sections in Photography as an Art Form, Documentary Photography, Light and Motion Studies, Artificial Lighting Photography. For current section offerings see departmental announcement.
 
Documentary Photography  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 186A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description:
(F,SP) Benton
 
Photography As an Art Form  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 186B [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Formerly 186C
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Selected Topics: Photography: Special Topics: Photography  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 186X [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of studio per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Studio sections in Photography as an Art Form, Documentary Photography, Light and Motion Studies, Artificial Lighting Photography. For current section offerings see departmental announcement.
(F,SP)
 
Selected Topics: Drawing  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 187 
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Environmental Design 11A-11B.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description:
 
Freehand Drawing  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 187A [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Description:
(F,SP)
 
Field Studies in Visual Studies  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 197 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: No more than 4 units allowed each semester. Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised experience relevant to specific areas of design in off-campus organizations. Regular individual meetings with faculty sponsor and written reports required. See General Catalog regarding unit limitation toward the degree.
(F,SP)
 
Special Group Study  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 198 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: No more than 4 units allowed each semester. Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Studies developed to meet needs. See General Catalog regarding unit limitation toward the degree.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Enrollment is restricted by regulations listed in General Catalog. Studies developed to meet individual needs.
(F,SP)
 
Advanced Visual Studies  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 280 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester.
Prerequisites: 181,186.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Advanced work in visual studies and photography.
(F,SP)
 
Special Group Study  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 298 [1-5 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: No more than 5 units allowed each semester. Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special group studies on topics to be introduced by instructor or students.
(F,SP)
 
Individual Study and Research for Master's Students  --  Visual Studies  (VIS STD) 299 [1-5 units]
Course Format: One unit will be assigned for each 4 hours of student effort per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Individual studies including reading and individual research under the supervision of a faculty adviser and designed to reinforce the student's background in areas related to the proposed topic.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to Visual Thinking  --  Practice of Art (ART) 8 [4 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Formerly 8A-8B
Description: A first course in the language, processes, and media of visual art. Course work will be organized around weekly lectures and studio problems that will introduce students to the nature of art making and visual thinking.
(F,SP) Staff
 
The Language of Drawing  --  Practice of Art (ART) 12 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8.
Description: A study of drawing as a tool for articulating what the eyes, hand, and mind discover and investigate when coordinated. Some sessions will be devoted to drawing the human figure. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Language of Painting  --  Practice of Art (ART) 13 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8.
Description: A concentrated investigation of what painting on a two-dimensional surface can elicit from what is both observed and felt. Illustrated talks will help familiarize you with issues that have concerned painters in the 20th century. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
The Language of Sculpture  --  Practice of Art (ART) 14 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8.
Description: This course is the study of the interaction between physical form and space. We will focus on building a strong conceptual foundation while developing the practical studio skills needed to translate your ideas into three dimensions. Shop practices will include hand, machine, and computer-aided fabrications. Field trips and illustrated talks will help acquaint students with the ideas sculptors have explored through history and in contemporary sculptural practices.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to Printmaking  --  Practice of Art (ART) 16 [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of lecture and three hours of studio per week.
Description: This course examines and explores various print disciplines. Students study and create traditional forms of fine art printmaking including woodcut, lithography, intaglio, and screenprinting as well as newer approaches which include transfer and digital printmaking. This course is a prerequisite for upper division print courses. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Digital Photography: The Image and the Hive Mind  --  Practice of Art (ART) 21 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and seven hours of studio per week.
Description: This class provides a basic foundation for digital photography with hands-on instruction in the use of digital cameras and online image dissemination. Topics include image capture, composition, image syntax, image analysis, image manipulation, metatext production, and image sequencing for visual narratives. We also study image dissemination through online networks including social networks, blogs, news, storage, search, and print services. Rather than limiting the discussion of photography to the production of the photographic image itself, we explore in written assignments how the reception of images can change based on context, usage, and network dynamics. While we rely on required DSLR digital cameras to produce images for weekly photographic assignments, we also experiment with alternate digital image generation techniques from telescopes to microscopes. All coursework will be posted and discussed online as well as in weekly lectures, workshops, and critiques. Course readings cover the history of photography, the theory of photographic reproduction and the theory of networked and memetic dissemination.
(F,SP) Niemeyer
 
Foundations of American Cyber-Culture  --  Practice of Art (ART) 23AC [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of lecture/studio per week.
Description: This new course will enable students to think critically about, and engage in practical experiments in, the complex interactions between new media and perceptions and performances of embodiment, agency, citizenship, collective action, individual identity, time and spatiality. We will pay particular attention to the categories of personhood that make up the UC Berkeley American Cultures rubric (race and ethnicity), as well as to gender, nation, and disability. The argument threading through the course will be the ways in which new media both reinforce pre-existing social hierarchies, and yet offer possibilities for the transcendence of those very categories. The new media -- and we will leave the precise definition of the new media as something to be argued about over the course of the semester -- can be yet another means for dividing and disenfranchising, and can be the conduit of violence and transnational dominance.
(F,SP) Staff
 
American Cybercultures: Principles of Internet Citizenship  --  Practice of Art (ART) W23AC [4 units]
Course Format:
Description: This online course establishes internet citizenship as the process of forming online communities through participation. The course itself seeks to establish a community of learners, innovators, and explorers who engage with 23 principles of internet culture through missions. The missions include topics aggregation, networking, identity, amplification, and subversion. Students work in small groups with about five members and complete learning missions through research and creative assignments using photography, writing, video, and user interaction design.
(F,SP) Niemeyer
 
Moving Image Media Production  --  Practice of Art (ART) 26 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and seven hours of studio per week.
Description: This course provides students with the technological and conceptual groundwork for advanced courses in video art and filmmaking including the use of digital cameras, sound recording, basic lighting techniques, digital editing, compression, and online dissemination. We will focus on what makes compelling moving images that elicit powerful intellectual and emotional responses. The course also explores the range of techniques and languages of creative video making from traditional story genres to more contemporary experimental forms. The course consists of weekly lectures, screenings, discussions and a lab section. The lab is a production workshop in which students will produce a series of short exercises and a final project.
(F,SP) Niemeyer, Walsh
 
Directed Group Study  --  Practice of Art (ART) 98 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of studio work per unit per week.
Prerequisites: Open to freshmen and sophomores.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: This is a student-initiated course to be offered for academic credit. The subject matter will vary from semester to semester and will be taught by the student facilitator under the supervision of the faculty sponsor. Topics to be related to art practice.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Supervised Independent Study  --  Practice of Art (ART) 99 [1-2 units]
Course Format: One to two hours of independent study per week.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: This course will be a rubric for all one and two credit Independent Study courses in Art Practice that concentrate on the practical aspects of art production. Some students will study gallery work by participating in every phase of producing art exhibitions--from selecting works to hanging and insuring them. Other students will learn concepts, skills and information they can use in their major courses. All students gaining credit from these courses will have to produce at least three short term papers analyzing their experiences and reflecting on the principles involved in their work.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Approaches to Painting  --  Practice of Art (ART) 102 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 13 or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Inquiry into concepts of order, process, and content as related to human experience. While faculty contact with students is highly individualized, the course involves group critiques and lectures as well as assigned field trips. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Drawing and Composition  --  Practice of Art (ART) 117 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8 and 12; and one from 13, 14, 16, 23 or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced drawing and composition, color and black-and-white, primarily on paper. 117 or 118 is required of all art majors. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Figure Drawing  --  Practice of Art (ART) 118 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8 and 12; and one from 13, 14, 16 and 23 or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Emphasis on the human figure seen in the context of pictorial space, dark and light and color. Various media. 118 or 117 is required of all art majors. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Global Perspectives in Contemporary Art  --  Practice of Art (ART) 119 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: for declared Art Practice majors.
Description: This course is designed to explore a range of contemporary art movements around the globe, through a closer look at their central ideas, artists, and artworks, as well as the preconditions and broader social context in which the work is being produced. Topics covered will range from the emergence of localized avant-garde movements in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America to the implicit globalism of the international biennial circuit.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Approaches to Printmaking: Intaglio  --  Practice of Art (ART) 120 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 16, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: An opportunity to discover what an artist can do with an etching press and a familiarity with such processes as etching, drypoint, aquatint, color, and monotype printing. The difference in the ways that these mediums enhance and condition your ideas will be made clear through individual and group critiques. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Approaches to Printmaking: Lithography  --  Practice of Art (ART) 122 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 16, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: In the course of making lithographs, you will be encouraged to find an aesthetic direction of your own. Your instructor will also help you develop skill in using both stone and metal plates. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
The Language of Printmaking-Screenprinting  --  Practice of Art (ART) 123 [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of lecture and three hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: Open to upper division art majors or by consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: The process of screenprinting images onto paper and other surfaces will be explored in a variety of image producing techniques. Hand drawn, photographic, and digitally manipulated images are combined to produce multiple works of limited edition fine art prints. Image content and development is examined through drawings, studies, slide lectures, group critiques, and direct assistance. Each student is required to attend all class periods and participate in group discussions and critique. It is the responsibility of the student to maintain a portfolio of all works executed during the semester and to turn in all assignments on time. The grade is determined by attendance, completion of projects and participation in critiques. Personal improvement will also be taken into account.
(F,SP) Hussong
 
Advanced Projects in Printmaking  --  Practice of Art (ART) 124 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 16, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Non-traditional projects in printmaking. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Approaches to Sculpture: Concept and Construction  --  Practice of Art (ART) 130 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 14, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Course is geared toward constructing objects, forms, and particular structures to reveal concept. This class will have more advanced instruction in fabrications, emphasizing the use of wood and metal shops. Architectural considerations, physical experience of space, and innovative sculptural practices will be explored. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Approaches to Sculpture: Ceramics  --  Practice of Art (ART) 132 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 14, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: An opportunity to learn the many ways of shaping and giving form to wet clay, then making it permanent by firing it. Illustrated talks will examine the ideas that have engaged ceramic sculptors in many traditions and the processes that they have used to expand them. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Approaches to Sculpture: Meaning in Material  --  Practice of Art (ART) 133 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 14, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This class will investigate the possibilities and potentials of sculptural material, both physically and conceptually. We will focus on a deeper exploration of the current state of art practice while questioning what methods and materials are considered non-traditional. We will discuss multiple applications as a means of mediating ideas in space, including sculpture, installation, video, photography and public exchanges. This class will have more advanced instruction in fabrications, including the wood and metal shops. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Advanced Projects in Ceramic Sculpture  --  Practice of Art (ART) 137 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 14, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Students who are experienced in clay may enroll in this course to continue developing their ideas and their technical command of ceramic materials and processes. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Approaches to Sculpture: Installations  --  Practice of Art (ART) 138 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, 14, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: In this class we will consider sculptural issues of (and beyond) the object itself, notions of "site specific," and of whether an object is distinct from its environment or is part of it. We will also question issues of space, placement, installation, context, and public interaction. Students will engage with a variety of sites, both on and off campus, with drawings and written proposals being an intergral part of all projects. Lectures and demonstrations will introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Temporal Structures: Video and Performance Art  --  Practice of Art (ART) 141 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, and 12; and one from 13, 14, 16, 23, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Projects are aimed at understanding and inventing ways in which time and change can become key elements in an artwork. Regular screenings of professional tapes will illustrate uses of the mediums and provide a historical context. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
New Genres  --  Practice of Art (ART) 142 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8 and 12; and one from 13, 14, 16, 23, or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: A survey intended to expose you to the nature and potential of such non-traditional tools for artmaking as performance, video, and audiotape. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to techniques and varied applications.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in Visual Studies  --  Practice of Art (ART) 160 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics of concern to the instructor, usually related to current research, which may fall outside of the normal curriculum or be of more restricted content than regular studio courses. An opportunity to investigate topics and mediums on an ad hoc basis when there is a compelling reason to do so, providing there is no other course that deals with these concerns. Primarily intended for advanced undergraduates and graduates in Art Practice but open to others. For special topics and enrollment see listings outside of 345 Kroeber.
(F,SP)
 
Issues in Cultural Display: Studio and Post-Studio Art Practices  --  Practice of Art (ART) 162 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 8.
Description: This is a seminar class designed to engage in "close readings" of contemporary art-making and curatorial practices. Through weekly studio visits with artists and/or curators, the course examines the practical methods, historical origins, philosophical roots, and political and aesthetic implications of each maker's practice. Readings and discussions will focus on (though not be limited to) issues concerning the interaction of aesthetics and ethics; culture and capital; copyright law; art and craft; singular vs. collective authorship.
(SP) Walsh
 
Social Practice: The Artist in Body & Site  --  Practice of Art (ART) 163 [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.
Description: Social Practice broadly refers to work produced through various forms of direct engagement with a site, social system or collaborator. Interdisciplinary in nature, such work often takes the form of guerilla interventions, performance, institutional critique, community based public art and political activity, all sharing the premise that art created in the public sphere can help alter public perception and work toward social transformation.
(F,SP)
 
Art and Meditation  --  Practice of Art (ART) 164 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Completion of all lower division requirements for the major.
Description: Meditation is arguably the most ancient, powerful, and yet simple spiritual practice in the world. It is known in various forms in nearly all times and cultures, and plays a part in every religious tradition. We will examine how meditation can affect your art both in terms of practice and content. The class will be structured with slide presentations, museum visits, discussion of reading, and reviews of art work. Art from various contemplative traditions will be examined.
(F) Sherwood
 
Art, Medicine, and Disabilities  --  Practice of Art (ART) 165 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio and/or supervised research and/or internship per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course will examine how visual artists have responded to illness and disability. We will consider visual representations of disability and healing, as well as the expressive work of visual artists working from within the personal experience of disability; in other words, we will look at disability as both a subject and a source of artistic creation. Several topics, historical and contemporary, will be explored. Students will complete either a semester-long internship with an arts and disability organization, a research paper, or a creative project.
(F,SP) Sherwood
 
Digital Video: The Architecture of Time  --  Practice of Art (ART) 171 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 23; or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This hands-on studio course is designed to present students with a foundation-level introduction to the skills, theories and concepts used in digital video production. Non-linear and non-destructive editing methods used in digital video are defining new "architectures of time" for cinematic creation and experience, and offer new and innovative possibilities for authoring new forms of the moving image. This course will expose students to a broad range of industry standard equipment, film and video history, theory, terminology, field and post-production skills. Students will be required to techinically master the digital media tools introduced in the course. Each week will include relevant readings, class discussions, guest speakers, demonstration of examples, and studio time for training and working on student assignments.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Digital Video: The Architecture of Time  --  Practice of Art (ART) C171 [4 units]
Course Format: Nine hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: Film 25A and 28A or 28B with a grade of B+ or better and consent of instructor.
Description: This hands-on studio course is designed to present students with a foundation-level introduction to the skills, theories, and concepts used in digital video production. As digital technologies continue to expand our notion of time and space, value and meaning, artists are using these tools to envision the impossible. Nonlinear and nondestructive editing methods used in digital video are defining new "architectures of time" for cinematic creation and experience, and offer new and innovative possibilities for authoring new forms of the moving image. Through direct experimentation, this course will expose students to a broad range of industry-standard equipment, film and video history, theory, terminology, field, and post-production skills. Students will be required to technically master the digital media tools introduced in the course, and personalize the new possibilities digital video brings to time-based art forms. Also listed as Film and Media C185.
(F,SP) Staff
 
CGI Animation Studies  --  Practice of Art (ART) 172 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 23; or equivalents.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Motion is a ubiquitous element of human experience, yet attempts to explain it remain incomplete. The representation of motion with technical means is in continuous development, starting perhaps with sculptural representations of celestial movements in antiquity and leading to dynamic computer graphics simulations of molecular processes today. In this production-intensive studio course, we will study computer graphics for motion simulations, or animations. We will also probe these tools for their use in creative expression and analyze their impact on our own perception of motion. Software used: Maya. Each week will include relevant readings, class discussions, guest speakers, demonstration of examples, and studio time for training and working on student assignments .
(F,SP) Staff
 
Sound Art  --  Practice of Art (ART) 173 [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of lecture and three hours of studio per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This is a studio class designed to introduce artists to the medium of sound. Students will learn the basic skills necessary to work with audio, including microphones, digital recording, editing and processing, speaker and installation design, and circuit-bending. In addition, students will learn about the history of sound art and the ways in which visual art and experimental sound practice inform and expand upon each other.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Advanced Digital Video  --  Practice of Art (ART) 174 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 23; or equivalents.
Description: This advanced studio course is designed for students who have mastered basic skills and concepts involved in digital video production, and are interested in further investigating critical, theoretical, and creative research topics in digital video production. Each week will include relevant readings, class discussions, guest speakers, demonstrat ion of examples, and studio time for training and working on student assignments .
(F,SP) Staff
 
Advanced Digital Video  --  Practice of Art (ART) C174 [4 units]
Course Format: Nine hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: Film 100, 185 with a grade of A- or better and consent of instructor.
Description: This advanced studio course is designed for students who have mastered basic skills and concepts involved in digital video production and are interested in further investigating critical, theoretical, and creative research topics in digital video production. Also listed as Film and Media C187.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Game Design Methods  --  Practice of Art (ART) 178 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and four hours of studio per week.
Prerequisites: 23AC.
Description: This course offers an introduction to game design and game studies. Game studies has five core elements: the study of games as transmitters of culture, the study of play and interactivity, the study of games as symbolic systems; the study of games as artifacts; and methods for creating games. We will study these core elements through play, play tests, play analysis, and comparative studies. Our reading list includes classic game studies theory and texts which support game design methods. After weekly writing and design exercises, our coursework will culminate in the design and evaluation of an original code-based game with a tangible interface.
(F,SP) Niemeyer
 
Game Design Methods  --  Practice of Art (ART) C178 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and two to four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Art 23AC, Art 172, and Film 25A.
Description: This course offers an introduction to game design and game studies. Game studies has five core elements: the study of games as culture generators, the study of play and interactivity, the study of games as symbolic systems, the study of games as artifacts, and the design of games. One process which is crucial to all these elements is to play. We will study the core elements of game studies through play, play tests, and the study of people playing. There will also be a close examination of classical game studies as well as practice-oriented texts. The final exam for this course is to design, test, and evaluate a playable game. Also listed as Film and Media C181.
(F,SP)
 
Mobile City Chronicles: Gaming with New Technologies of Detection and Security  --  Practice of Art (ART) C179 [5 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of studio per week.
Description: This course studies the city through cases of 19th and 21st century urban detection, including detective fiction, epidemiology, urban planning, surveillance, ethnography, and related technologies. Students develop and playtest cellphone games that in turn require players to investigate cities. This "gaming the city" uses smart phones not only to read existing databases but also to write to them, producing new urban practice and knowledge. The course is organized as a research and game lab. Also listed as Anthropology C146.
(F,SP)
 
Advanced Digital Photography  --  Practice of Art (ART) 180 [4 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of studio and one hour of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: ART 26 - Beginning Digital Photography or equivalent
Credit option: Course may be repeated with consent of instructor.
Description: This course will cover a range of digital media and practices, with a view towards exploring current and future possibilities for photography. Inclusive of multiple approaches to scale, execution, and technique, the course enables students to examine and push the limits of photographic practices. This course will help students advance their digital shooting and Photoshop skills from a beginning to a more advanced level, and will cover the workflow of digital photography: camera usage, scanning, image editing, management, and printing.
(F,SP) DeSouza, Staff
 
Senior Projects/Professional Practices  --  Practice of Art (ART) 185 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of studio critique per week.
Prerequisites: Senior level students only.
Description: This course provides students with a foundation for understanding their work within a cross-disciplinary critical context. Through class and individual critique, readings, guest artists, and field trips, students will explore the practical and conceptual components of their own media and practice within a broader discussion of artistic production. In addition to this focused attention on the critique process, the class with address the ongoing needs of supporting one's work within a community of artists, arts professionals, and arts organizations. Each student will work towards developing the most effective tools for communicating their work to these broader audiences using strategies that are appropriate/effective for their ideas, media, and audience.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Special Study for Honors Candidates in the Practice of Art  --  Practice of Art (ART) H195A [4 units]
Course Format: Twelve hours of independent study per week.
Prerequisites: Senior standing with 3.3 GPA and consent of instructor
Credit option: This class may be applied toward major requirements.
Description: Honors students are required to take three units of H195A. They may elect to take an additional three units (H195B) the following semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Special Study for Honors Candidates in the Practice of Art  --  Practice of Art (ART) H195B [4 units]
Course Format: Twelve hours of independent study per week.
Prerequisites: Senior standing with 3.3 GPA and consent of the instructor.
Credit option: This class may be applied towards major requirements.
Description: Honors students are required to take three units of H195A. They may elect to take an additional three units (H195B) the following semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Bridging the Arts Seminar  --  Practice of Art (ART) 196 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One and one-half to six hours of fieldwork per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Dancers are encouraged to have taken Theater 166 with Lisa Wymore. All Bridging the Arts participants are required to pass a background check with the DOJ and the FBI.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Course Number Guide in the Berkeley Bulletin.
Description: Bridging the Arts is open to artists from a variety of disciplines including dance, spoken word, theater, performance, creative writing, social practice, music, and visual arts. Through readings, written reflection, guest speakers, group discussion, and teaching in the field, Bridging the Arts (BtheArts) Student Instructors explore the arts in the public education system. Student Instructors develop and implement arts curricula that is both age appropriate and culturally relevant to their students in underserved Bay Area Schools.
(F,SP) Putnam
 
Directed Group Study  --  Practice of Art (ART) 198 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of group study per unit per week.
Prerequisites: Upper division standing.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: This is a student-initiated course to be offered for academic credit. The subject matter will vary from semester to semester and will be taught by the student facilitator under the supervision of the faculty sponsor. Topics to be related to art practice.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Supervised Independent Study for Advanced Undergraduates  --  Practice of Art (ART) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Hours to be arranged.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Course does not satisfy major requirement for art.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description:
(F,SP) Staff
 
Seminar: Theory and Criticism  --  Practice of Art (ART) 218 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Weekly meetings will provide a forum for the discussion of issues related to assigned readings in the fields of esthetics, theory and art criticism.
Staff
 
NEW MEDIA METHODS  --  Practice of Art (ART) 229 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar and two hours of demonstration per week.
Description: In this methods course we will study key languages of new media innovation, ranging from flow charts to scripting languages and circuit diagrams. Our study method involves the creation and application of sensing devices in an urban context, and engages students in establishing chains of references which connect ground truth to data, data to information, information to people, people to actions, and actions to policies. Taking into account technical, political, cultural and literacy questions we seek to connect our data production work with information needs of underserved communities in the Bay Area region.
(F,SP)
 
Independent Study  --  Practice of Art (ART) 290 [4 units]
Course Format: Hours to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Individual projects by first-year graduate students with one assigned instructor.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Seminar for M.F.A. Students  --  Practice of Art (ART) 294 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Admission to the M.F.A. program.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Studio work emphasizing various aspects of form. Group criticism. Intended especially for M.F.A. candidates.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Independent Study for M.F.A. Students  --  Practice of Art (ART) 295 [4-12 units]
Course Format: Hours to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Admission to the M.F.A. program.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: M.F.A. candidates, special study--M.F.A. Committee members as well as other faculty.
(F,SP)
 
Directed Group Study  --  Practice of Art (ART) 298 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Directed group study in special problems, group research, and/or interdisciplinary topics.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Supervised Independent Study for Graduate Students  --  Practice of Art (ART) 299 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Hours to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor, graduate adviser, and Department Chair.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Special projects by graduate students undertaken with a specific member of the faculty.
(F,SP) Staff
 
The Teaching of Art: Practice  --  Practice of Art (ART) 301 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture/discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Utilizing aspects of pedagogical and andragogical teaching, the interactive lecture, collaborative learning, simulations, and brainstorming-freewriting, this semester-long seminar will focus on these various intergrative teaching approaches, to facilitate communication in the diverse and wide-ranging arena which is fine arts today. Discussion of course aims, instructional methods, grading standards, and special problems in the teaching of art practice.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Reading and Composition  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) R2A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 1, UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or equivalent.
Formerly 2A
Description: Through the study of the literary, political, social and psychological dimensions of representative works of Asian American literature, this course introduces students to close textual analysis, fosters critical judgment, and reinforces academic writing skills. Satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition requirement.
(F,SP)
 
Reading and Composition  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) R2B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 2A, English 1A or equivalent.
Formerly 2B
Description: This course examines literary works by Asian American, African American, Chicano, and Native American writers in their political and social contexts, focusing on similarities and differences between the experiences of ethnic minorities in the U.S. Emphasis is on literary interpretation and sustained analytical writing. Satisfies the second half of the Reading and Composition requirement.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to the History of Asians in the United States  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 20A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Asian American Studies 20A after taking XAsian American Studies 20A but may remove a deficient grade.
Description: Introductory comparative analysis of the Asian American experience from 1848 to present. Topics include an analysis of the Asian American perspective; cultural roots; immigration and settlement patterns; labor, legal, political, and social history.
(F,SP)
 
Introduction to the Contemporary Issues in the Asian American Communities  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 20B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: An introduction to Asian American communities and the social, economic, and political issues they confront. The diverse range of communities, both suburban and urban, will be surveyed and situated within a domestic and global context.
(F)
 
Cultural Politics and Practices in Asian American Communities  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 20C [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: Analysis of social, intellectual, and artistic currents in Asian American communities. Focus will be on social practices, popular culture, the arts and expression (e.g. language and literature), and the historical and political contexts in which they are produced and consumed.
(SP)
 
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 39 
Course Format: Seminar format.
Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sophomores.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.
 
Field Studies in Asian American Communities  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 97 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of fieldwork per week per unit. Three hours of fieldwork per week per unit. One and one-half hours of fieldwork per week per unit for ten weeks. Six hours of fieldwork per week per unit for eight weeks. One and one-half hours of fieldwork per week per unit for ten weeks. Six hours of fie
Prerequisites: Restricted to freshmen and sophomores; consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: University organized and supervised field program involving experiences in schools, school-related activities, community and community-related activities.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Group Study  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 98 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of work per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Restricted to freshmen and sophomores; consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Group study of selected topics which will vary from semester to semester.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 99 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of independent study per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Individual research on a topic which leads to the writing of a major paper. Regular meetings with faculty sponsor.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Chinese American History  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 121 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or equivalent.
Description: Chinese American history, 1848 to present. Topics include influence of traditional values, Eastern and Western; patterns of immigration and settlement; labor history; the influence of public policy, foreign and domestic, on the Chinese individual and community.
(SP)
 
Japanese American History  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 122 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or equivalent.
Description: This course will be presented as a proseminar with selected topics in order to give students an opportunity to participate in the dynamics of the study of Japanese American history. Topics include immigration, anti-Japanese racism, labor, concentration camps, agriculture, art and literature, and personality and culture.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Korean American History  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 123 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or equivalent.
Description: Koreans in America from 1876 to the present. Topics include comparative immigration and settlement patterns; labor and socio-economic life; political activities; community organization; and issues related to the contemporary population influx.
(SP)
 
Filipino American History  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 124 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or equivalent.
Description: Topics include consequences of the Spanish-American War on Filipino emigration; conditions in Hawaii and California and the need for Filipino labor; community development; changing relations between the U.S. and the Philippines; effects ofthe independence movement and World War II on Filipino Americans; and contemporary issues.
(F,SP)
 
Contemporary Issues of Southeast Asian Refugees in the U.S  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 125 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or equivalent.
Description: This course will introduce students to the sociocultural, economic, educational, and political issues facing Southeast Asian refugees in the U.S. While the course focus is on the Asian American experience, references will be made to the pre-migration experiences and histories of the Southeast Asian refugee groups. The processes and problems in the formulation of refugee programs and services in the U.S. also will be addressed in their implications for refugee resettlement and adaptation experience. Emphasis will be placed on comparative analyses of the Southeast Asian refugee communities.
(F,SP)
 
Southeast Asian Migration and Community Formation  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 126 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or equivalent.
Description: This course will examine Southeast Asian migration and resettlement in the U.S. in the context of the United States involvement in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia during the Vietnam War. It will also address the post-war "legacies" and their impact on the societies and politics of the three countries as well as neighboring states in the region. Asylum politics and refugee camp experiences will be addressed in the discussion of the formation of U.S. resettlement policies and of the adaptation of Southeast Asian refugees.
(F,SP)
 
South Asian American Historical and Contemporary Issues  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 127 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or equivalent.
Description: Examines immigration and social history of South Asian Americans from the early 20th century to present. Development of South Asian American communities within the social, political and economic contexts of South Asia and the U.S.
 
Muslims in America  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 128AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hour of discussion per week.
Description: The course traces Islam's journey in America. It will deal with the emergence of identifiable Muslim communities throughout the U.S. and focus on patterns of migration, the ethnic makeup of such communities, gender dynamics, political identity, and cases of conversion to Islam. The course will spend considerable time on the African American, Indo-Pakistani, and Arab American Muslim communities since they constitute the largest groupings. It also examines in depth the emergence of national, regional, and local Muslim institutions, patterns of development pursued by a number of them, and levels of cooperation or antagonism. The course seeks an examination of gender relations and dynamics across the various Muslim groupings, and the internal and external factors that contribute to real and imagined crisis. The course seeks to conduct and document the growth and expansion of mosques, schools, and community centers in the greater Bay Area. Finally, no class on Islam in America would be complete without a critical examination of the impacts of 9/11 on Muslim communities, the erosion of civil rights, and the ongoing war on terrorism.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Asian Diaspora(s) from an Asian American Perspective  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 131 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Description: Analyzes the global presence of an Asian group with a significant U.S. population: migration/settlement history, transnational economic/political/cultural interactions between diasporic communities and with land of origin, impact on Asian American community/identity formation. Instructor selects group(s).
(F,SP)
 
Islamaphobia and Constructing Otherness  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 132 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Description: This course will examine and attempt to understand Islamophobia, as the most recently articulated principle of otherness and its implications domestically and globally. The course will also closely examine the ideological and epistemological frameworks employed in discourses of otherness, and the complex social, political, economic, gender-based, and religious forces entangled in its historical and modern reproduction.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Islamophobia and Constructing Otherness  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 132AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Description: This course will examine and attempt to understand Islamophobia, as the most recently articulated principle of otherness and its implications domestically and globally. The course will also closely examine the ideological and epistemological frameworks employed in discourses of otherness, and the complex social, political, economic, gender-based, and religious forces entangled in its historical and modern reproduction.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Topics in Asian Popular Culture  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 138 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics in Asian popular culture. Analysis of historical and contemporary issues addressed in popular media in Asia, such as 1990s Hong Kong cinema, fifth generation Chinese films, films of China and Taiwan, Japanese and Korean anime, South Asian and Bollywood cinema, and South Korean film and television drama. Course topics will vary with the expertise of the particular instructor.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Law in the Asian American Community  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 141 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or 20B.
Description: Course will examine the nature, structure, and operation of selected legal institutions as they affect Asian American communities and will attempt to analyze the roles and effects of law, class, and race in American society. May be taken with 197.
(F,SP)
 
Asian American Health  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 143 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: This course examines the state of Asian American health, the historical, structural, and cultural contexts of diverse Asian American communities, and the role of race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status in the production of unequal outcomes between Asian Americans and other racial/ethnic groups as well as across different Asian American subgroups.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Religions of Asian America  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 144 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will examine how Asian American communities engage religion and how, in turn, they are shaped by the different facets of religious life. Religion is examined in the form of major traditions-Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, Sikhism, Christianity-and readings will introduce students to key concepts, practices, and institutions which help to define these trajectories.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Politics, Public Policy, and Asian American Communities  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 145 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or 20B.
Description: An examination of the purpose, power, and function of the executive, legislative and judicial branches of the federal government and their relationship to the Asian American community. The course presents a range of contemporary issues to illustrate how government institutions and the Asian community define issues and respond to political challenges.
(F,SP)
 
Asian Americans and Education  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 146 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hour of discussion per week.
Description: This course examines the historical and contemporary issues which shape the educational experiences of Asian Americans. Critical issues such as bilingual education, university admissions, and the education of Asian immigrants as well as theoretical models of Asian American academic success will be explored and critically analyzed.
(SP) Staff
 
Gender and Generation in Asian American Families  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 150 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or 20B.
Description: The influence of cultural legacy, ethnic background, immigration history, community structure, class and economic status, and racism on gender and generational relations in the Asian American family.
(SP)
 
Asian American Women: Theory and Experience  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 151 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or 20B.
Description: Examines the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian American women in relation to work, sexuality, intellectual and artistic activity, and family and community life as well as the development of Asian American feminist thought and its relation to cultural nationalism.
(SP)
 
Research Methodologies in Asian American Communities  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 165 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 20A or 20B.
Description: Approaches to research in the Asian American community with emphasis on the San Francisco Bay Area. Problems of research design, measurement, and data collection, processing ,and analysis will be considered.
(SP)
 
Asian Americans in Film and Video  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 171 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Introduces students to films and videos by and about Asian Americans; presents an overview of the development of the Asian American media arts field in relation to current cultural theories and American film history and theory.
(F,SP)
 
Asian American Literature  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 172 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit with different topic.
Description: Introduces students to representative works of Asian American literature by writers from the major ethnic subgroups; examines the works in their sociohistorical context; analyzes thematic and formal elements intertextually to form a coherent understanding of the Asian American literary tradition.
(F,SP)
 
Creative Writing  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 173 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Instruction and practice in forms and techniques of prose, verse, drama or other writing as an expression of Asian American experiences and a contribution to evolving Asian American culture; may focus on specific genres or tasks depending on instructor.
(F,SP)
 
Contemporary Narratives on the Philippines and the United States  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 175 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Description: The course will examine the various strategies of (re-)narrating colonial/neocolonial history in three genres: literature (novels, short fiction, poetry), essays, and films from the Philippines and the United States. Notions such as imperialism, nation, narration, history, nationalism, memory, ethnicity, language, power, gender, and subject formation will be discussed.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Genre in Asian American Literature  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 176 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Investigates specific genres in Asian American literature (e.g., autobiography, biography, drama, etc.) in terms of formal characteristics, innovations, comparisons of works from various subgroups in relation to counterparts in dominant Anglo-American tradition.
(F,SP)
 
Asian American Art: Remapping Modernity: Art and Artists in the 20th Century  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 177 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Description: Seminar in contemporary Asian American visual art, with focus on the politics of production and reception. Works by such artists as Y. David Chung, Hung Liu, Yong Soon Min, Long Nguyen, and Manuel Ocampo will be studied.
(F,SP)
 
Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Literature and Culture  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 178 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Explores gender/sexuality issues in Asian American literature and culture, such as simultaneous construction of gender/ethnicity/race/culture; heterosexual (masculinist/feminist) and gay/lesbian cultural projects; the body; family relations; matrilineal and patrilineal traditions. Instructor selects focus.
(F,SP)
 
Chinese American Literature  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 181 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Analyzes literary representations of contemporary and/or historical experiences of Chinese Americans; genre, formal, and stylistic features; definition of cultural identity and development of literary tradition. Primarily English-language works, some translations from Chinese.
(F,SP)
 
Korean American Literature  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 183 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Critical readings of major Korean American literary work, including autobiography and personal memoir, autobiographical fiction, poetry, short stories and novel, with attention to conditions surrounding the production and consumption of these writings.
(F,SP)
 
Seminar on Advanced Topics in Asian American Studies  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 190 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Advanced seminar in Asian American Studies with topics to be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP)
 
Seminar on Advanced Topics in Asian American Studies  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 190AC [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Advanced seminar in Asian American Studies with topics to be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP)
 
Senior Thesis  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 195 [4 units]
Course Format: Independent study.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: Writing of a thesis under the direction of member(s) of the faculty.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Senior Honors Thesis for Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies Majors  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) H195A [3 units]
Course Format: Seminar and individual meetings with faculty adviser.
Prerequisites: Senior standing. Approval of Faculty Advisor, 3.5 GPA on all University work, and a 3.5 GPA in courses in the major.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence.
Description: Course for senior Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies maors designed to support and guide the writing of a senior honors thesis. For senior Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies majors who have been approved for the honors program.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Senior Honors Thesis for Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies Majors  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) H195B [3 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Senior standing. Approval of Faculty Advisor, 3.5 GPA on all University work, and a 3.5 GPA in courses in the major.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence.
Description: Course for senior Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies maors designed to support and guide the writing of a senior honors thesis. For senior Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies majors who have been approved for the honors program.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Field Study in Asian American Communities  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 197 [1-3 units]
Course Format: One and one-half hours of fieldwork per week per unit for ten weeks. Three hours of fieldwork per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: University organized and supervised field program involving experiences in schools, school-related activities, community, and community-related activities.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Supervised Group Study  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 198 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of work per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Group study of selected topics which will vary from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  Asian American and Asian Diaspora Studies  (ASAMST) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of work per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Individual research on a topic which leads to the writing of a major paper. Regular meetings with faculty sponsor.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to Asia  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) 10 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Formerly 10A-10B
Description: This course is designed to interest students in Asian cultures early in their undergraduate studies. Topics such as trade, social and political formations, religions, food, and expressive culture that have been important in history as well as in contemporary times in East, South, and Southeast Asia will serve as unifying themes. Comparative thinking across regions of Asia and the perspectives of multiple disciplines will be brought to bear on the themes.
(F) Staff
 
Directed Group Study  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) 98 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Group meetings to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Consent of Instructor required.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Group discussion, research and reporting on selected topics.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) 150 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced research in current issues or regions of Asian studies. The course will focus on specific areas or topics with appropriate comparative material included. Topics change each semester.
(F,SP)
 
Senior Honors  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) H195A [3 units]
Course Format: Individual study supervised by two faculty members.
Prerequisites: Open to seniors in the group major in Asian Studies whose GPA is 3.5 or higher in all university work and 3.6 or higher in the major.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence.
Description: Supervised readings or field research on a significant problem in Asian Studies, collection and analysis of research materials, and the preparation of an honors dissertation in close consultation with two members of the faculty.
(F,SP)
 
Senior Honors  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) H195B [3 units]
Course Format: Individual study supervised by two faculty members.
Prerequisites: Open to seniors in the group major in Asian Studies whose GPA is 3.5 or higher in all university work and 3.6 or higher in the major.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence.
Description: Supervised readings or field research on a significant problem in Asian Studies, collection and analysis of research materials, and the preparation of an honors dissertation in close consultation with two members of the faculty.
(F,SP)
 
Directed Group Study  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) 198 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Group meetings to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Upper division standing and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Directed group study of special topics approved by the chair of the Group in Asian Studies.
(F,SP)
 
Independent Study  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Individual meetings to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Written proposal must be approved by faculty adviser.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Directed individual study on topics approved by the chair of the Group in Asian Studies.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Asian Studies Proseminar  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) 201 [1 units]
Course Format: Fifteen hours of seminar per semester.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This course is required of all first-year graduate students and supervised by a regular faculty member. The seminar will familiarize students with faculty, their Asian interests, research methods, and the courses they teach. It consists of presentations by faculty on their past, present, and future research.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Directed Group Study  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) 298 [2-6 units]
Course Format: Group meetings to be arranged.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Group study of selected topics that vary from term to term.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Independent Study  --  Asian Studies  (ASIANST) 299 [1-7 units]
Course Format: Individual conferences to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Directed reading in subject matter not covered in scheduled seminar offerings.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Soft X-rays and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation  --  Applied Science and Technology  (AST) C210 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Physics 110, 137, and Mathematics 53, 54 or equivalent.
Formerly El Engineering 290G
Description: This course will explore modern developments in the physics and applications of soft x-rays. It begins with a review of electromagnetic radiation at short wavelengths including dipole radiation, scattering and refractive index, using a semi-classical atomic model. Subject matter will include the generation of x-rays with laboratory tubes, synchrotron radiation, laser-plasma sources, x-ray lasers, and black body radiation. Concepts of spatial and temporal coherence will be discussed. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C213.
(SP) Staff
 
Thin-Film Science and Technology  --  Applied Science and Technology  (AST) C225 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in engineering, physics, chemistry, or chemical engineering.
Description: Thin-film nucleation and growth, microstructural evolution and reactions. Comparison of thin-film deposition techniques. Characterization techniques. Processing of thin films by ion implantation and rapid annealing. Processing-microstructure-property-performance relationships in the context of applications in information storage, ICs, micro-electromechanical systems and optoelectronics. Also listed as Materials Science and Engineering C225.
(SP) Wu, Dubon
 
Partially Ionized Plasmas  --  Applied Science and Technology  (AST) C239 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Upper division course in electromagnetics or fluid dynamics.
Description: Introduction to partially ionized, chemically reactive plasmas, including collisional processes, diffusion, sources, sheaths, boundaries, and diagnostics. DC, RF, and microwave discharges. Applications to plasma-assisted materials processing and to plasma wall interactions. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C239.
Offered alternate years. (SP) Staff
 
Applied Spectroscopy  --  Applied Science and Technology  (AST) C295R [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in engineering, physics, chemistry, or chemical engineering; courses: quantum mechanics, linear vector space theory.
Description: After a brief review of quantum mechanics and semi-classical theories for the interaction of radiation with matter, this course will survey the various spectroscopies associated with the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to radio waves. Special emphasis is placed on application to research problems in applied and engineering sciences. Graduate researchers interested in systematic in situ process characterization, analysis, or discovery are best served by this course. Also listed as Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering C295R.
(SP) Reimer
 
Individual Study or Research  --  Applied Science and Technology  (AST) 299 [1-12 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; graduate standing.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Investigations of advanced problems in applied science and technology. Sponsored by Engineering Interdisciplinary Studies Center.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to Modern Cosmology  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 3 [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week.
Description: Description of research and results in modern extragalactic astronomy and cosmology. We read the stories of discoveries of the principles of our Universe. Simple algebra is used.
Bloom, Davis, Ma
 
Introduction to Astrophysics  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 7A [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Physics 7A-7B (7B can be concurrent), or consent of the instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive 2 units of credit for 7A after taking 10; 6 units of credit for both 7A-7B after taking 10.
Description: This is the first part of an overview of astrophysics, with an emphasis on the way in which physics is applied to astronomy. This course deals with the solar system and stars, while 7B covers galaxies and cosmology. Solar system topics include orbital mechanics, geology of terrestrial planets, planetary atmospheres, and the formation of the solar system. The study of stars will treat determination of observations, properties and stellar structure, and evolution. The physics in this course includes mechanics and gravitation; kinetic theory of gases; properties of radiation and radiative energy transport; quantum mechanics of photons, atoms, and electrons; and magnetic fields.
(F) Chiang, Marcy, Quataert
 
Introduction to Astrophysics  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 7B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Physics 7A-7B (7B can be concurrent) or consent of the instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive 2 units of credit for 7B after taking 10; 6 units of credit for both 7A-7B after taking 10.
Description: This is the second part of an overview of astrophysics, which begins with 7A. This course covers the Milky Way galaxy, star formation and the interstellar medium, galaxies, black holes, quasars, dark matter, the expansion of the universe and its large-scale structure, and cosmology and the Big Bang. The physics in this course includes that used in 7A (mechanics and gravitation; kinetic theory of gases; properties of radiation and radiative energy transport; quantum mechanics of photons, atoms, and electrons; and magnetic fields) and adds the special and general theories of relativity.
(SP) Bloom, Chiang, Marcy, Quataert
 
Selected Topics in Astronomy  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 9 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This seminar will explore one of a variety of subjects in greater depth than in introductory courses. Possible topics include stars, galaxies, the solar system, the interstellar medium, relativity and cosmology, history of astronomy, observational astronomy, and life in the universe.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to General Astronomy  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 10 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Astronomy 10 after taking Astronomy 7A or 7B, XAstronomy 10. Students can remove a deficient grade in XAstronomy 10 by taking Astronomy 10, Letter and Science C70U or Astronomy C10.
Description: A description of modern astronomy with emphasis on the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the Universe. Additional topics optionally discussed include quasars, pulsars, black holes, and extraterrestrial communication, etc. Individual instructor's synopses available from the department.
(F,SP) Basri, Blitz, Bloom, Davis
 
Introduction to General Astronomy  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C10 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C10 after taking 10, 7A, or 7B. Students can remove a deficient grade in C10 by taking 10.
Description: A description of modern astronomy with emphasis on the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the Universe. Additional topics optionally discussed include quasars, pulsars, black holes, and extraterrestrial communication, etc. Individual instructor's synopses available from the department. Also listed as Letters and Science C70U.
(F) Filippenko
 
The Planets  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C12 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C12 after taking N12, W12, Earth and Planetary Sciences N12, or W12.
Description: A tour of the mysteries and inner workings of our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets form, and what are they made of? Why do some bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes? What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This course will introduce basic physics, chemistry, and math to understand planets, moons, rings, comets, asteroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding other worlds will help us save our own planet and help us understand our place in the universe. Also listed as Letters and Science C70T and Earth and Planetary Science C12.
(F,SP)
 
Origins: from the Big Bang to the Emergence of Humans  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C13 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.
Description: This course will cover our modern scientific understanding of origins, from the Big Bang to the formation of planets like Earth, evolution by natural selection, the genetic basis of evolution, and the emergence of humans. These ideas are of great intrinsic scientific importance and also have far reaching implications for other aspects of people's lives (e.g., philosophical, religious, and political). A major theme will be the scientific method and how we know what we know. Also listed as Integrative Biology C13.
(F) Marshall, Quataert
 
Freshman Seminars  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 24 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Section 1 to be graded on a pass/no pass basis. Section 2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis.
Description: The Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to provide new students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all campus departments, and topics vary from department to department and semester to semester.
(F,SP)
 
Seminar  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 39 [1.5 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: A small-size undergraduate seminar exploring one astronomical topic in depth. Students are responsible for much of the presentation.
(SP) Basri, Filippenko, Davis
 
Sophomore Seminar  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 84 [1,2 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks. Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five weeks.
Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-grade basis.
Description: Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.
(F,SP)
 
Directed Group Study  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 98 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Restricted to freshmen and sophomores; consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Topics will vary with instructor.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Directed Study in Astronomy  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 99 [1-3 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: 7A-B, 10 and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised observational studies or directed reading for lower division students.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Optical and Infrared Astronomy Laboratory  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 120 [4 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 7A-7B; Mathematics 53, 54; Physics 7A-7B-7C (7C may be taken concurrently).
Formerly 120A
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 120 after taking 120A or 122.
Description: This course requires four to six experiments such as the following: accurate position and brightness measurements of stars; laboratory exploration of the characteristics of two-dimensional charge-coupled devices (CCDs) and infrared detectors; measurement of the distance, reddening, and age of a star cluster; measurement of the Stokes parameters and linear polarization of diffuse synchrotron and reflection nebulae; measurement of the period and pulse shape of the Crab pulsar using Fourier techniques. Professional telescopes will be used such as those at Leuschner Observatory and Lick Observatory. There is a emphasis on error analysis, software development in the IDL language, and high-quality written reports.
(F) Bower, Marcy
 
Radio Astronomy Laboratory  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 121 [4 units]
Course Format: Four hours of discussion and one hour of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 7A-7B; Mathematics 53, 54; Physics 7A-7B-7C; Physics 110B recommended.
Formerly 120B
Description: Several basic laboratory experiments that concentrate on microwave electronics and techniques; construction of receiving, observing, and data analysis systems for two radioastronomical telescopes, a single-dish 21-cm line system and a 12-GHz interferometer; use of these telescopes for astronomical observing projects including structure of the Milky Way galaxy, precise position measurement of several radio sources, and measurement of the radio brightness distributions of the sun and moon with high angular resolution. There is a heavy emphasis on digital data acquisition, software development in the IDL language, and high-quality written reports.
(SP) Bower, Heiles
 
Stellar Physics  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 160 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Senior standing in astronomy/physics or consent of instructor. Physics 112 (may be taken concurrently) and either Physics 110A-110B or Physics 137A-137B.
Formerly C160A and Physics C160A
Description: Topics covered include some, but not necessarily all, of the following. Observational constraints on the properties and evolution of stars. Theory of stellar structure and evolution. Stellar atmospheres and stellar spectroscopy. Stellar nucleosynthesis. Supernovae. Degeneracy of matter and structure of collapsed stars. Elements of gas dynamics, accretion onto compact objects, and x-ray sources. Dynamics and evolution of close binary systems. Stellar pulsation.
(F) Filippenko, Quataert, Stahler
 
Relativistic Astrophysics and Cosmology  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C161 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Physics 110A-110B; Physics 112 (may be taken concurrently).
Formerly C160B and Physics C160B
Description: Elements of general relativity. Physics of pulsars, cosmic rays, black holes. The cosmological distance scale, elementary cosmological models, properties of galaxies and quasars. The mass density and age of the universe. Evidence for dark matter and dark energy and concepts of the early universe and of galaxy formation. Reflections on astrophysics as a probe of the extrema of physics. Also listed as Physics C161.
(SP) Boggs, Davis, Holzapfel, A. Lee, Ma, Quataert
 
Planetary Astrophysics  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C162 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 53, 54; Physics 7A-7B-7C.
Formerly C149
Description: Physics of planetary systems, both solar and extra-solar. Star and planet formation, radioactive dating, small-body dynamics and interaction of radiation with matter, tides, planetary interiors, atmospheres, and magnetospheres. High-quality oral presentations may be required in addition to problem sets and a final exam. Also listed as Earth and Planetary Science C162.
Chiang, de Pater, Marcy
 
Special Study for Honors Candidates  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) H195 [2-4 units]
Course Format:
Description: Individual project of research or study.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Directed Group Study  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 198 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Topics will vary with instructor.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Independent study.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description:
(F,SP) Staff
 
Radiation Processes in Astronomy  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 201 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Physics 105, 110A; 110B concurrently; open to advanced undergraduates with GPA of 3.70.
Description: Formerly 201A. An introduction to the basic physics of astronomy and astrophysics at the graduate level. Principles of energy transfer by radiation. Elements of classical and quantum theory of photon emission; bremsstrahlung, cyclotron and synchrotron radiation. Compton scattering, atomic, molecular and nuclear electromagnetic transitions. Collisional excitation of atoms, molecules and nuclei.
Chiang, Quataert
 
Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C202 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly 202
Description: Principles of gas dynamics, self-gravitating fluids, magnetohydrodynamics and elementary kinetic theory. Aspects of convection, fluid oscillations, linear instabilities, spiral density waves, shock waves, turbulence, accretion disks, stellar winds, and jets. Also listed as Physics C202.
(F,SP) Chiang, Kasen, Ma, Quataert, White
 
Astrophysical Techniques  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 203 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week and frequent laboratory work plus observatory visits.
Prerequisites: 201 and 290A; 290B must be taken concurrently.
Description: Introduction to the flow of astronomical signals through telescope optics and into detectors; subsequent calibration, deconvolution of instrumental artifacts, and analysis. A broad wavelength approach is maintained with focus on shared fundamental concepts. Students "adopt a wavelength band" for assignments and presentations. Analysis and simulation of astronomical signals, noise, and errors.
(SP) Backer, Basri, Blitz, Graham, Marcy, Welch
 
Numerical Techniques in Astronomy  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 204 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 54.
Description: Methods of data analysis, model fitting, and data display, all oriented towards the detailed analysis of astronomical observation data and/or numerical results from simulations. Specific topics include probability density functions, error propagation, maximum likelihood, least squares, data and function fitting, Fourier transforms, wavelets, principal components analysis, color images. The software language used is the Interactive Data Language (IDL).
(SP) Heiles
 
Radiation Processes in Astronomy  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C207 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Physics 105, 110A; 110B concurrently; open to advanced undergraduates with GPA of 3.70.
Formerly 201
Description: An introduction to the basic physics of astronomy and astrophysics at the graduate level. Principles of energy transfer by radiation. Elements of classical and quantum theory of photon emission; bremsstrahlung, cyclotron and synchrotron radiation. Compton scattering, atomic, molecular and nuclear electromagnetic transitions. Collisional excitation of atoms, molecules and nuclei. Also listed as Physics C207.
(F,SP) Bower, Chiang, Kasen, Quataert
 
Interstellar Matter  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 216 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 201.
Description: A survey of the observational data and theoretical ideas on the interstellar medium, with emphasis on the inferred physical conditions.
(F) Blitz, Heiles, Glassgold, Graham
 
Stellar Dynamics and Galactic Structure  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 218 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: A basic course. Structure and kinematics of the galaxy; stellar population concepts; dynamics of stellar systems with and without encounters.
(F) Blitz, Davis, Graham
 
Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C228 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: A survey of physical cosmology - the study of the origin, evolution, and fate of the universe. Topics include the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model, thermal history and big bang nucleosynthesis, evidence and nature of dark matter and dark energy, the formation and growth of galaxies and large scale structure, the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave radiation, inflation in the early universe, tests of cosmological models, and current research areas. The course complements the material of Astronomy 218. Also listed as Physics C228.
(F) Davis, Holzapfel, Lee, Ma, Seljak, White
 
Solar System Astrophysics  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C249 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The physical foundations of planetary sciences. Topics include planetary interiors and surfaces, planetary atmospheres and magnetospheres, and smaller bodies in our solar system. The physical processes at work are developed in some detail, and an evolutionary picture for our solar system, and each class of objects, is developed. Some discussion of other (potential) planetary systems is also included.
(F) Chiang, de Pater
 
Special Topics in Astrophysics  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 250 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics will vary from semester to semester. See department for announcements.
(SP) Staff
 
Stellar Structure and Evolution  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 252 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Physics 110A-110B, 112, 137A-137B.
Formerly C252 and Physics C252
Description: Equations of stellar structure, radiative transfer and convection, thermonuclear reactions and stellar energy generations; stellar models, degenerate configurations, evolutionary sequences, supernovae, neutron stars, black holes, nucleosynthesis.
(F,SP) Filippenko, Marcy
 
High Energy Astrophysics  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C254 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Astronomy C207/Physics C207 or consent of instructor. Astronomy C202/Physics C202 recommended.
Description: Basic physics of high energy radiation processes in an astrophysics environment. Cosmic ray production and propagation. Applications selected from pulsars, x-ray sources, supernovae, interstellar medium, extragalactic radio sources, quasars, and big-bang cosmologies. Also listed as Physics C254.
(F) Boggs, Quataert
 
Computational Methods in Theoretical Astrophysics  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 255 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: A broad in-depth survey of state-of-the-art numerical approaches to astrophysical self-gravitational gas dynamics with application to large scale simulation of coupled non-linear astrophysical flows. Finite-difference approaches for Lagrangian and Eulerian astrophysical hydrodynamics and coupled radiation-hydrodynamics. N-body gravitation techniques including direct N-body, P-M, P3M, and hierarchical Tree. Particle gas dynamics methods such as smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), adaptive SPH and unification of SPH, and gravity tree hierarchies (TREE-SPH). Advanced techniques such as higher order Godunov finite difference methods with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Applications of these approaches in three broad areas: cosmology, high energy astrophysics, and star formation and the interstellar medium.
(SP) Klein
 
Theoretical Astrophysics Seminar  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C285 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: The study of theoretical astrophysics. Also listed as Physics C285.
(F,SP) Quataert
 
Introduction to Current Research  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 290A [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Survey of research currently being performed in the Department or the University.
(F) de Pater
 
Introduction to Current Research  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 290B [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Continuation of 290A. Study of a research topic with an individual staff member.
(SP) de Pater
 
Cosmology  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C290C [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: For undergraduate students, consent of instructor required. Previous background in cosmology recommended.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Physics C290C.
(F,SP) White, Cohn
 
Seminar  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 292 [1-2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: In addition to the weekly colloquium, the Department offers seminars in advanced topics, several of which are announced at the beginning of each semester. A maximum of 5 units may be taken per semester with a limitation of 2 in any one section.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Planetary Science Seminar  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) C292 [1 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: The departments of Astronomy and Earth and Planetary Science offer a joint research seminar in advanced topics in planetary science, featuring speakers drawn from graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, faculty, and visiting scholars. Topics will span planetary interiors; surface morphology; atmospheres; dynamics; planet formation; and astrobiology. Speakers will vary from semester to semester. Meetings will be held once a week for 1 hour each, and the schedule of speakers will be determined on the first day of class. To pass the class, participants will be required to give a 30-minute presentation, either on their own research or on recent results from the literature. Also listed as Earth and Planetary Science C292.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Directed Group Study  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 298 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Tutorial.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Tutorial for groups of two or three students.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Advanced Study and Research  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 299 [2-12 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description:
(F,SP) Staff
 
Undergraduate Astronomy Instruction  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 301 [1-2 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture and three to six hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: An elementary astronomy course and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 units.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Open to a limited number of highly qualified undergraduate students interested in astronomy teaching at the college level. Students will participate in a seminar on educational methods and engage in tutorial or laboratory teaching under supervision of a faculty member.
Staff
 
Instruction Techniques in General Astronomy  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 375 [2-6 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Formerly Astronomy 300
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Discussion and practice of teaching techniques as applied to astronomy. Open to graduate students who are presently teaching assistants or associates. Two units for course plus one section; three units for two discussion sections.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Individual Study for Doctoral Students  --  Astronomy  (ASTRON) 602 [1-8 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare themselves for the various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D. (and other doctoral degrees). May not be used for unit or residence requirement for the doctoral degree.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 10 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: This course is intended for lower division students interested in acquiring a foundation in biomedicine with topics ranging from evolutionary biology to human physiology. The emphasis is on the integration of engineering applications to biology and health. The goal is for undergraduate engineering students to gain sufficient biology and human physiology fundamentals so that they are better prepared to study specialized topics, e.g., biomechanics, imaging, computational biology, tissue engineering, biomonitoring, drug development, robotics, and other topics covered by upper division and graduate courses in UC Berkeley departments of Molecular and Cell Biology, Integrative Biology, Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, and courses in the UC San Francisco Division of Bioengineering. The specific lecture topics and exercises will include the key aspects of genomics and proteomics as well as topics on plant and animal evolution, stem cell biomedicine, and tissue regeneration and replacement. Medical physiology topics include relevant engineering aspects of human brain, heart, musculoskeletal, and other systems.
(F) Conboy, Kumar
 
Aspects of Bioengineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 24 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: This introductory seminar is designed to give freshmen and sophomores a glimpse of a broad selection of bioengineering research that is currently underway at Berkeley and UCSF. Students will become familiar with bioengineering applications in the various concentration areas and see how engineering principles can be applied to biological and medical problems.
(F,SP) T. Johnson, Staff
 
Careers in Biotechnology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 25 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: This introductory seminar is designed to give freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to explore specialties related to engineering in the pharmaceutical/biotech field. A series of one-hour seminars will be presented by industry professionals, professors, and researchers. Topics may include biotechnology and pharmaceutical manufacturing; process and control engineering; drug inspection process; research and development; compliance and validation; construction process for a GMP facility; project management; and engineered solutions to environmental challenges. This course is of interest to students in all areas of engineering and biology, including industrial engineering and manufacturing, chemical engineering, and bioengineering.
(SP) Liepmann, Staff
 
Sophomore Seminar  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 84 [1,2 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks. Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five weeks.
Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-grade basis.
Description: Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses offered by faculty members in departments all across the campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, regular intellectual contact between faculty members and students in the crucial second year. The topics vary from department to department and semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.
(F,SP)
 
Supervised Independent Group Studies  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 98 [1-4 units]
Course Format: Group study meetings.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricul a section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Organized group study on various topics under the sponsorship of a member of the Bioengineering faculty.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Supervised Independent Study and Research  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 99 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Freshman or sophomore standing and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised independent study for lower division students.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Ethics in Science and Engineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 100 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The goal of this semester course is to present the issues of professional conduct in the practice of engineering, research, publication, public and private disclosures, and in managing professional and financial conflicts. The method is through historical didactic presentations, case studies, presentations of methods for problem solving in ethical matters, and classroom debates on contemporary ethical issues. The faculty will be drawn from national experts and faculty from religious studies, journalism, and law from the UC Berkeley campus.
(SP) Head-Gordon
 
Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 101 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of discussion/computer laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 100, Mathematics 53, 54, Physics 7A-7B, or consent of instructor.
Description: This course teaches the fundamental principles underlying modern sensing and control instrumentation used in biology and medicine. The course takes an integrative analytic and hands-on approach to measurement theory and practice by presenting and analyzing example instruments currently used for biology and medical research, including EEG, ECG, pulsed oximeters, Complete Blood Count (CBC), etc.
(SP) Conolly
 
Biomechanics: Analysis and Design  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 102 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Math 53, 54; Physics 7A.
Description: This course introduces, develops and applies the methods of continuum mechanics to biomechanical phenomena abundant in biology and medicine. It is intended for upper level undergraduate students who have been exposed to vectors, differential equations, and undergraduate course(s) in physics and certain aspects of modern biology.
(F) Mofrad
 
Biological Transport Phenomena  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 104 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 53, 54, and Physics 7A.
Description: The transport of mass, momentum, and energy are critical to the function of living systems and the design of medical devices. Biological transport phenomena are present at a wide range of length scales: molecular, cellular, organ (whole and by functional unit), and organism. This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum mechanics to biological transport phenomena over a range of length and time scales. The course is intended for undergraduate students who have taken a course in differential equations and an introductory course in physics. Students should be familiar with basic biology; an understanding of physiology is useful, but not assumed.
(SP) Johnson
 
Biomedical Physiology for Engineers  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 110 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 10, Biology 1A; Math 54 (may be taken concurrently).
Description: This course introduces students to the physiology of human organ systems, with an emphasis on quantitative problem solving, engineering-style modeling, and applications to clinical medicine. The course will begin with a review of basic principles of cellular physiology, including membrane transport and electrophysiology, and then take a system-by-system approach to the physiology of various organ systems, including the cardiovascular, pulmonary, renal, and endocrine systems. Throughout, the course will feature extensive discussions of clinical conditions associated with dysfunction in specific physiological processes as well as the role of medical devices and prostheses. This course is geared towards upper-division bioengineering students who wish to solidify their foundation in physiology, especially in preparation for a career in clinical medicine or the biomedical device industry.
(SP) Kumar
 
Functional Biomaterials Development and Characterization  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 111 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1A or 4A, Biology 1A and 1AL, Molecular and Cell Biology C100A/Chemistry C130 or Molecular Cell Biology 102.
Description: This course is intended for upper level engineering undergraduate students interested in the development of novel functional proteins and peptide motifs and characterization of their physical and biological properties using various instrumentation tools in quantitative manners.
(F) SW Lee
 
Molecular Cell Biomechanics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 112 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 54, Physics 7A, 102, or consent of instructors.
Description: This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum and statistical mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over a range of length scales, from molecular to cellular levels. It is intended for senior undergraduate students who have been exposed to differential equations, mechanics, and certain aspects of modern biology.
(SP) Mofrad
 
Molecular Cell Biomechanics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C112 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 54; Physics 7A, Bioengineering 102, or Mechanical Engineering C85; or consent of instructor.
Description: This course applies methods of statistical continuum mechanics to subcellar biomechanical phenomena ranging from nanoscale (molecular) to microscale (whole cell and cell population) biological processes at the interface of mechanics, biology, and chemistry. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C115.
(SP) Mofrad
 
Stem Cells and Technologies  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 113 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 10 and Biology 1A, or consent of instructor.
Description: This course will teach the main concepts and current views on key attributes of embryonic stem cells (ESC), will introduce theory of their function in embryonic development, methods of ESC derivation, propagation, and characterization, and will discuss currently developing stem cell technologies.
(SP) Conboy
 
Cell Biology for Engineers  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 115 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry C130/Molecular Cell Biology C100A or equivalent recommended.
Description: The structural and functional characteristics of tissues are altered by cells in response to culture conditions, loading, injury, and various other factors. A contemporary understanding of the form, function, and longevity of tissues includes knowledge of tissue microstructure, composition of matrix, and cell function. Students will be introduced to molecular biology techniques as applied to cells and tissues including immunofluorescence, image analysis, protein quantification, gene expression, and cell culture.
(F,SP) Johnson
 
Cell and Tissue Engineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 116 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 102 and Chemistry C130/Molecular and Cell Biology C100A or equivalent recommended, or consent of instructor.
Description: The goal of tissue engineering is to fabricate substitutes to restore tissue structure and functions. Understanding cell function in response to environmental cues will help us to establish design criteria and develop engineering tools for tissue fabrication. This course will introduce the basic concepts and approaches in the field, and train students to design and engineer biological substitutes. Lectures will be based on the textbook, the reference books and recent literature. Discussion sections will include the discussion of current literature and issues related to course content, homework, exams, and projects. Homework includes quantitative analysis, essay questions, and literature research. There will be a midterm exam, final exam, and a design project (presentation and paper). The final project will be a group project (three to four students) or independent project (required for graduate students). The topic will be chosen by each group and approved by instructor/GSIs.
(SP) Li
 
Structural Aspects of Biomaterials  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C117 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 108 or Engineering 45.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C117 after taking C222 or Mechanical Engineering C215.
Description: This course covers the structure and mechanical functions of load bearing tissues and their replacements. Natural and synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical applications are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are examined. Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and constitutive relationships of tissues are covered in order to design biomaterial replacements for structural function. Material selection for load bearing applications including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics, dentistry, and cardiology are addressed. Mechanical design for longevity including topics of fatigue, wear, and fracture are reviewed. Case studies that examine failures of devices are presented. This course includes a teaching/design laboratory component that involves design analysis of medical devices and outreach teaching to the public community. Several problem-based projects are utilized throughout the semester for design analysis. In addition to technical content, this course involves rigorous technical writing assignments, oral communication skill development and teamwork. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C117.
(SP) Pruitt
 
Biological Performance of Materials  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C118 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Bioengineering C105B/Mechanical Engineering C105B or equivalent, Bioengineering 102 and 104, Engineering 45, and Molecular and Cell Biology 130 recommended.
Description: This course is intended to give students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of topics related to biomedical materials selection and design. Structure-property relationships of biomedical materials and their interaction with biological systems will be addressed. Applications of the concepts developed include blood-materials compatibility, biomimetic materials, hard and soft tissue-materials interactions, drug delivery, tissue engineering, and biotechnology. Also listed as Materials Science and Engineering C118.
(F) Healy
 
Orthopedic Biomechanics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C119 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion/computer workshop per week.
Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering C85/Civil Engineering C30 or Bioengineering 102 (may be taken concurrently). Proficiency in Matlab or equivalent.
Formerly C176
Description: Statics, dynamics, optimization theory, composite beam theory, beam-on-elastic foundation theory, Hertz contact theory, and materials behavior. Forces and moments acting on human joints; composition and mechanical behavior of orthopedic biomaterials; design/analysis of artificial joint, spine, and fracture fixation prostheses; musculoskeletal tissues including bone, cartilage, tendon, ligament, and muscle; osteoporosis and fracture-risk predication of bones; and bone adaptation. MATLAB-based project to integrate the course material. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C176.
(F,SP) Keaveny
 
BioMEMS and Medical Devices  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 121 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3A; Physics 7A and 7B.
Description: Biophysical and chemical principles of biomedical devices, bionanotechnology, bionanophotonics, and biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS). Topics include basics of nano- and microfabrication, soft-lithography, DNA arrays, protein arrays, electrokinetics, electrochemical, transducers, microfluidic devices, biosensor, point of care diagnostics, lab-on-a-chip, drug delivery microsystems, clinical lab-on-a-chip, advanced biomolecular probes, etc.
(SP) L. Lee
 
BioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 121L [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of laboratory and two hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 102 or 104; 22/22L or Molecular and Cell Biology C100A/Chemistry C130 or equivalent.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 121L after taking 221L.
Description: Students will become familiar with BioMEMS and Lab-on-a-Chip research. Students will design and fabricate their own novel micro- or nano-scale device to address a specific problem in biotechnology using the latest micro- and nano-technological tools and fabrication techniques. This will involve an intensive primary literature review, experimental design, and quantitative data analysis. Results will be presented during class presentations and at a final poster symposium.
(F,SP) L. Lee, Dueck
 
Introduction to Robotics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C125 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture, one hour of discussion, and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 120 or equivalent or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C125/Electrical Engineering C125 after taking 215A.
Description: An introduction to the kinematics, dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vision, and sensing. The course covers forward and inverse kinematics of serial chain manipulators, the manipulator Jacobian, force relations, dynamics, and control. It presents elementary principles on proximity, tactile, and force sensing, vision sensors, camera calibration, stereo construction, and motion detection. The course concludes with current applications of robotics in active perception, medical robotics, and other areas. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C125.
(F) Bajcsy
 
Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cell Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 131 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 53 and Biology 1A (may be taken concurrently).
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 131 after taking 231.
Description: Topics include computational approaches and techniques to gene structure and genome annotation, sequence alignment using dynamic programming, protein domain analysis, RNA folding and structure prediction, RNA sequence design for synthetic biology, genetic and biochemical pathways and networks, UNIX and scripting languages, basic probability and information theory. Various "case studies" in these areas are reviewed; web-based computational biology tools will be used by students and programming projects will be given. Computational biology research connections to biotechnology will be explored.
(F) Holmes
 
Genetic Devices  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 132 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Engineering 7 or Computer Science 61A, Mathematics 54, Chemistry 3A, and Chemistry C130/Molecular and Cell Biology C100A.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 132 after taking 232.
Description: This senior-level course is a comprehensive survey of genetic devices. These DNA-based constructs are comprised of multiple "parts" that together encode a higher-level biological behavior and perform useful human-defined functions. Such constructs are the engineering target for most projects in synthetic biology. Included within this class of constructs are genetic circuits, sensors, biosynthetic pathways, and microbiological functions.
(F) Anderson
 
Frontiers in Microbial Systems Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 135 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Upper division standing with background in differential equations and probability. Coursework in molecular and cell biology or biochemistry recommended.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 135 after taking 235.
Description: This course is aimed at graduate and advanced undergraduate students from the (bio) engineering and chemo-physical sciences interested in a research-oriented introduction to current topics in systems biology. Focusing mainly on two well studied microbiological model systems--the chemotaxis network and Lambda bacteriophage infection--the class systematically introduces key concepts and techniques for biological network deduction, modelling, analysis, evolution, and synthetic network design. Students analyze the impact of approaches from the quantitative sciences--such as deterministic modelling, stochastic processes, statistics, non-linear dynamics, control theory, information theory, graph theory, etc.--on understanding biological processes, including (stochastic) gene regulation, signalling, network evolution, and synthetic network design. The course aims to identify unsolved problems and discusses possible novel approaches while encouraging students to develop ideas to explore new directions in their own research.
(F,SP) Arkin, Bischofs-Pfeifer, Wolf
 
Laboratory in the Mechanics of Organisms  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C136L [3 units]
Course Format: Six hours of laboratory and one hour of discussion per week, plus one field trip.
Prerequisites: Integrative Biology 135 or consent of instructor; Electrical Engineering 105, 120 or Computer Science 184 recommended.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Integrative Biology C135L, Bioengineering C136L or Electrical Engineering C145O after taking Integrative Biology 135L.
Description: Introduction to laboratory and field study of the biomechanics of animals and plants using fundamental biomechanical techniques and equipment. Course has a series of rotations involving students in experiments demonstrating how solid and fluid mechanics can be used to discover the way in which diverse organisms move and interact with their physical environment. The laboratories emphasize sampling methodology, experimental design, and statistical interpretation of results. Latter third of course devoted to independent research projects. Written reports and class presentation of project results are required. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C145O and Integrative Biology C135L.
(SP) Staff
 
Synthetic Biology Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 140L [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Molecular biology, basic chemistry and biochemistry, and differential equations; or consent of instructor.
Description: This laboratory course is designed as an introduction to research in synthetic biology, a ground-up approach to genetic engineering with applications in bioenergy, heathcare, materials science, and chemical production. In this course, we will design and execute a real research project. Each student will be responsible for designing and constructing components for the group project and then performing experiments to analyze the system. In addition to laboratory work, we will have lectures on methods and design concepts in synthetic biology including an introduction to Biobricks, gene synthesis, computer modeling, directed evolution, practical molecular biology, and biochemistry.
(SP) Anderson
 
Computational Methods in Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 143 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory, and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Math 53 and Math 54; programming experience preferred but not required.
Description: An introduction to biophysical simulation methods and algorithms, including molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, mathematical optimization, and "non-algorithmic" computation such as neural networks. Various case studies in applying these areas in the areas of protein folding, protein structure prediction, drug docking, and enzymatics will be covered. Core Specialization: Core B (Informatics and Genomics); Core D (Computational Biology); BioE Content: Biological.
(F) Head-Gordon
 
Introduction to Protein Informatics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C144 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell Biology C100A or 102 or similar background in Molecular Biology.
Description: This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of molecular biology, and to the bioinformatics tools and databases used for the prediction of protein function and structure. It is designed to impart both a theoretical understanding of popular computational methods, as well as some experience with protein sequence analysis methods applied to real data. This class includes no programming, and no programming background is required. Also listed as Plant and Microbial Biology C144.
(F) Sjolander
 
Protein Informatics Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C144L [3 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture and nine hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Bioengineering C144/Plant and Microbial Biology C144.
Description: This course is intended to introduce students to a variety of bioinformatics techniques that are used to predict protein function and structure. It is designed to be taken concurrently with C144 (which provides the theoretical foundations for the methods used in the laboratory class), although students can petition to take this laboratory course separately. No programming is performed in this class, and no prior programming experience is required. Also listed as Plant and Microbial Biology C144L.
(SP) Sjolander
 
Introductory Electronic Transducers Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C145L [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 40.
Description: Laboratory exercises exploring a variety of electronic transducers for measuring physical quantities such as temperature, force, displacement, sound, light, ionic potential; the use of circuits for low-level differential amplification and analog signal processing; and the use of microcomputers for digital sampling and display. Lectures cover principles explored in the laboratory exercises; construction, response and signal to noise of electronic transducers and actuators; and design of circuits for sensing and controlling physical quantities. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C145L.
(F) Derenzo
 
Introductory Microcomputer Interfacing Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C145M [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 40, Computer Science 61B or a working knowledge of ANSI C programming or consent of instructor.
Description: Laboratory exercises constructing basic interfacing circuits and writing 20-100 line C programs for data acquisition, storage, analysis, display, and control. Use of the IBM PC with microprogrammable digital counter/timer, parallel I/O port. Circuit components include anti-aliasing filters, the S/H amplifier, A/D and D/A converters. Exercises include effects of aliasing in periodic sampling, fast Fourier transforms of basic waveforms, the use of the Hanning filter for leakage reduction, Fourier analysis of the human voice, digital filters, and control using Fourier deconvolution. Lectures cover principles explored in the lab exercises and design of microcomputer-based systems for data acquisitions, analysis and control. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C145M.
(SP) Derenzo
 
Principles of Synthetic Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 147 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Math 53 and 54; Molecular and Cell Biology C100A/Chemistry C130; or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 147 after taking 247.
Description: The field of synthetic biology is quickly emerging as potentially one of the most important and profound ways by which we can understand and manipulate our physical world for desired purposes. In this course, the field and its natural scientific and engineering basis are introduced. Relevant topics in cellular and molecular biology and biophysics, dynamical and engineering systems, and design and operation of natural and synthetic circuits are covered in a concise manner that then allows the student to begin to design new biology-based systems.
(F) Arkin
 
Bioenergy and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Approaches  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 148 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3A and Molecular and Cell Biology C100A/Chemistry C130A or equivalent.
Description: This course will cover metabolic engineering and the various synthetic biology approaches for optimizing pathway performance. Use of metabolic engineering to produce biofuels and general "green technology" will be emphasized since these aims are currently pushing these fields. The course is meant to be a practical guide for metabolic engineering and the related advances in synthetic biology as well the related industrial research and opportunities.
(SP) Dueber
 
Introduction of Bionanoscience and Bionanotechnology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 150 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Biology 1A and Chemistry 1A.
Description: This course is intended for the bioengineering or engineering undergraduate students interested in acquiring a background in recent development of bio-nanomaterials and bio-nanotechnology. The emphasis of the class is to understand the properties of biological basis building blocks, their assembly principles in nature, and their application to build functional materials and devices. The goal is for the bioengineering students to gain sufficient chemical and physical aspects of biological materials through the case study of spider webs, silks, sea shells, diatoms, bones, and teeth, as well as recently developed self-assembled nanostructures inspired by nature. The course covers the structures and properties of amino acids, DNAs, sugars, lipids, and their natural and artifical assembly structures. It also covers nanoscale inorganic materials used to develop nano medicines, bio-imaging, bio-sensors, bioelectronics, and machinery.
(F) S. W. Lee
 
Micro/Nanofluidics for Bioengineering and Lab-On-A-Chip  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 151 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3B, Physics 7B, Bioengineering 102 or Mechanical Engineering 106 or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 151 after taking 251.
Description: Introduction and in-depth treatment of theory relevant to fluid flow in microfluidic and nanofluidic systems supplemented by critical assessment of recent applications drawn from the literature. Topics include low Reynolds Number flow, mass transport including diffusion phenomena, and emphasis on electrokinetic systems and bioanalytical applications of said phenomena.
(SP) Herr
 
Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 163 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 102 or consent of instructor, Chemistry 3A, and Physics 7B.
Description: This course provides undergraduate and graduate bioengineering students with an opportunity to increase their knowledge of topics in the emerging field of biophotonics with an emphasis on fluorescence spectroscopy, biosensors and devices for optical imaging and detection of biomolecules. This course will cover the photophysics and photochemistry of organic molecules, the design and characterization of biosensors and their applications within diverse environments.
(SP) Marriott
 
Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 163L [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of laboratory and two hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Bioengineering 163L; experience in a research lab and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Bioengineering 163L after taking Bioengineering 263L.
Description: This course provides undergraduate and graduate bioengineering students with an opportunity to acquire essential experimental skills in fluorescence spectroscopy and the design, evaluation, and optimization of optical biosensors for quantitative measurements of proteins and their targets. Groups of students will be responsible for the research, design, and development of a biosensor or diagnostic device for the detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of a specific biomarker(s).
(F) Marriott
 
Optics and Microscopy  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 164 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Physics 7A-7B or 8A-8B or equivalent introductory physics course.
Description: This course teaches fundamental principles of optics and examines contemporary methods of optical microscopy for cells and molecules. Students will learn how to design simple optical systems, calculate system performance, and apply imaging techniques including transmission, reflection, phase, and fluorescence microscopy to investigate biological samples. The capabilities of optical microscopy will be compared with complementary techniques including electron microscopy, coherence tomography, and atomic force microscopy. Students will also be responsible for researching their final project outside of class and presenting a specific application of modern microscopy to biological research as part of an end-of-semester project.
(F) Fletcher
 
Medical Imaging Signals and Systems  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C165 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 20 and Engineering 7 or equivalent; Knowledge of Matlab or linear algebra assumed.
Description: Biomedical imaging is a clinically important application of engineering, applied mathematics, physics, and medicine. In this course, we apply linear systems theory and basic physics to analyze X-ray imaging, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, and MRI. We cover the basic physics and instrumentation that characterizes medical image as an ideal perfect-resolution image blurred by an impulse response. This material could prepare the student for a career in designing new medical imaging systems that reliably detect small tumors or infarcts. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C145B.
(F,SP) Conolly
 
Practical Light Microscopy  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 168L [3 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Description: This laboratory course is designed for students interested in obtaining practical hands-on training in optical imaging and instrumentation. Using a combination of lenses, cameras, and data acquisition equipment, students will construct simple light microscopes that introduce basic concepts and limitations important in biomedical optical imaging. Topics include compound microscopes, Kohler illumination, Rayleigh two-point resolution, image contrast including dark-field and fluorescence microscopy, and specialized techniques such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Intended for students in both engineering and the sciences, this course will emphasize applied aspects of optical imaging and provide a base of practical skill and reference material that students can leverage in their own research or in industry.
(SP) Fletcher
 
The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C181 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1B or Chemistry 4B, Mathematics 1B, Biology 1A.
Credit option: Repeatable when topic changes with consent of instructor.
Description: After an introduction to the different aspects of our global energy consumption, the course will focus on the role of biomass. The course will illustrate how the global scale of energy guides the biomass research. Emphasis will be placed on the integration of the biological aspects (crop selection, harvesting, storage and distribution, and chemical composition of biomass) with the chemical aspects to convert biomass to energy. The course aims to engage students in state-of-the-art research. Also listed as Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering C195A, Plant and Microbial Biology C124, and Chemistry C138.
(F,SP) Bell, Blanch, Clark, Smit, C. Somerville
 
Special Topics in Bioengineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 190 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course covers current topics of research interest in bioengineering. The course content may vary from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Senior Design Projects  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 192 [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Senior standing.
Description: This semester-long course introduces students to bioengineering project-based learning in small teams, with a strong emphasis on need-based solutions for real medical and research problems through prototype solution selection, design, and testing. The course is designed to provide a "capstone" design experience for bioengineering seniors. The course is structured around didactic lectures, and a textbook, from which assigned readings will be drawn, and supplemented by additional handouts, readings, and lecture material. Where appropriate, the syllabus includes guest lectures from clinicians and practicing engineers from academia and industry. The course includes active learning through organized activities, during which teams will participate in exercises meant to reinforce lecture material through direct application to the team design project.
(F) Herr
 
Honors Undergraduate Research  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) H194 [3,4 units]
Course Format: Variable format.
Prerequisites: Upper division technical GPA 3.3 or higher and consent of instructor and adviser.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 units.
Description: Supervised research. Students who have completed 3 or more upper division courses may pursue original research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. May be taken a second time for credit only. A final report or presentation is required. A maximum of 4 units of this course may be used to fulfill the research or technical elective requirement or in the Bioengineering program.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Undergraduate Design Research  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 196 [4 units]
Course Format: Individual research.
Prerequisites: Junior or senior status, consent of instructor and faculty adviser.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit once.
Description: Supervised research. This course will satisfy the Senior Bioengineering Design project requirement. Students with junior or senior status may pursue research under the direction of one of the members of the staff. May be taken a second time for credit only. A final report or presentation is required.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Directed Group Study for Advanced Undergraduates  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 198 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Upper division standing and good academic standing. (2.0 grade point average and above)
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Group study of a selected topic or topics in bioengineering, usually relating to new developments.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Supervised Independent Study  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricul a section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised independent study.
(F,SP) Staff
 
The Graduate Group Introductory Seminar  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 200 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Enrollment in PhD Program in Bioengineering or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: An introduction to research in bioengineering including specific case studies and organization of this rapidly expanding and diverse field.
(F) Staff
 
Advanced Orthopedic Biomechanics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C209 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture, one hour of laboratory, and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: ME C85/CE C30 or Bio Eng 102; concurrent enrollment OK. Proficiency in MatLab or equivalent. Prior knowledge of biology or anatomy is not assumed.
Credit option: Students will not receive credit for this course if they have taken ME C176/Bio E C119.
Description: Students will learn the application of engineering concepts including statics, dynamics, optimization theory, composite beam theory, beam-on-elastic foundation theory, Hertz contact theory, and materials behavior. Topics will include forces and moments acting on human joints; composition and mechanical behavior of orthopedic biomaterials; design/analysis of artificial joint, spine, and fracture fixation prostheses; musculoskeletal tissues including bone, cartilage, tendon, ligament, and muscle; osteoporosis and fracture-risk predication of bones; and bone adaptation. Students will be challenged in a MATLAB-based project to integrate the course material in an attempt to gain insight into contemporary design/analysis/problems. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C210.
(F,SP) O'Connell, Keaveny
 
Cell and Tissue Mechanotransduction  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 211 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Undergraduate cell biology or consent of instructor.
Description: This course will focus on biophysical and bioengineering aspects of mechanotransduction, the process through which living cells sense and respond to their mechanical environment. Students will learn how mechanical inputs to cells influence both subcellular biochemistry and whole-cell behavior. They will also study newly-engineered technologies for force manipulation and measurement in living cells, and synthetic strategies to control the mechanics and chemistry of the extracellular matrix. Finally, students will learn about the role of mechanotransduction in selected human organ systems and how these mechanisms may go awry in the setting of the disease. Instruction will feature lectures, discussions, analysis of relevant research papers, assembly of a literature review and a research proposal, and an oral presentation.
(F) Kumar
 
Heat and Mass Transport in Biomedical Engineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C212 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 106 and 109 (these may be taken concurrently).
Description: Fundamental processes of heat and mass transport in biological systems; organic molecules, cells, biological organs, whole animals. Derivation of mathematical models and discussion of experimental procedures. Applications to biomedical engineering. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C212.
(SP) Staff
 
Fluid Mechanics of Biological Systems  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C213 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering 106 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Description: Fluid mechanical aspects of various physiological systems, the circulatory, respiratory, and renal systems. Motion in large and small blood vessels. Pulsatile and peristaltic flows. Other biofluidmechanical flows: the ear, eye, etc. Instrumentation for fluid measurements in biological systems and for medical diagnosis and applications. Artificial devices for replacement of organs and/or functions, e.g. blood oxygenators, kidney dialysis machines, artificial hearts/circulatory assist devices. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C213.
(F,SP) Berger, Liepmann
 
Advanced Tissue Mechanics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C214 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering C176, Mechanical Engineering 185; graduate standing or consent of instructor. Knowledge of MATLAB or equivalent.
Description: The goal of this course is to provide a foundation for characterizing and understanding the mechanical behavior of load-bearing tissues. A variety of mechanics topics will be introduced, including anisotropic elasticity and failure, cellular solid theory, biphasic theory, and quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory. Building from this theoretical basis, we will explore the constitutive behavior of a wide variety of biological tissues. After taking this course, students should have sufficient background to independently study the mechanical behavior of most biological tissues. Formal discussion section will include a seminar series with external speakers. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C214.
(SP) Staff
 
Mechanobiology of the Cell: Dynamics of the Cytoskeleton and Nucleus  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C215 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Open to graduate students or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C215/Mechanical Engineering C216 after taking 215.
Description: This course develops and applies scaling laws and the methods of continuum and statistical mechanics to understand micro- and nano-scale mechanobiological phenomena involved in the living cell with particular attention the nucleus and the cytoskelton as well as the interactions of the cell with the extracellular matrix and how these interactions may cause changes in cell architecture and biology, consequently leading to functional adaptation or pathological conditions. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C216.
(F) Mofrad
 
Macromolecular Science in Biotechnology and Medicine  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C216 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Bioengineering 115 or equivalent; open to seniors with consent of instructor.
Description: Overview of the problems associated with the selection and function of polymers used in biotechnology and medicine. Principles of polymer science, polymer synthesis, and structure-property-performance relationships of polymers. Particular emphasis is placed on the performance of polymers in biological environments. Interactions between macromolecular and biological systems for therapy and diagnosis. Specific applications will include drug delivery, gene therapy, tissue engineering, and surface engineering. Also listed as Materials Science and Engineering C216.
(SP) Healy
 
Biomimetic Engineering -- Engineering from Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C217 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in engineering or consent of instructor.
Description: Study of nature's solutions to specific problems with the aim of determining appropriate engineering analogs. Morphology, scaling, and design in organisms applied to engineering structures. Mechanical principles in nature and their application to engineering devices. Mechanical behavior of biological materials as governed by underlying microstructure, with the potential for synthesis into engineered materials. Trade-offs between redundancy and efficiency. Students will work in teams on projects where they will take examples of designs, concepts, and models from biology and determine their potential in specific engineering applications. Also listed as Integrative Biology C217 and Mechanical Engineering C217.
(F) Dharan
 
Stem Cells and Directed Organogenesis  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C218 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Grading option: Grading: Letter; Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory for CIRM humanities and law fellows.
Description: This course will provide an overview of basic and applied embryonic stem cell (ESC) biology. Topics will include early embryonic development, ESC laboratory methods, biomaterials for directed differentiation and other stem cell manipulations, and clinical uses of stem cells. Also listed as Molecular and Cell Biology C237.
(SP) Conboy
 
Protein Engineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C219 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
Description: An in-depth study of the current methods used to design and engineer proteins. Emphasis on how strategies can be applied in the laboratory. Relevant case studies presented to illustrate method variations and applications. Intended for graduate students. Also listed as Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering C270.
(F) Tullman-Ercek
 
Cells and Biomaterials Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 220L [4 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Cell and tissue engineering; upper division cell biology course or consent of instructor.
Description: The objective of this course is to teach graduate students the essential laboratory techniques in the design and characterization and analysis of cells and biomaterials. The course will cover basics on synthetic biomaterials and native matrix, cellular responses to biomaterials, three-dimensional culture, and tissue engineering. The course includes a lecture and a laboratory section each week. There will be a midterm exam, final exam, and a tissue engineering group project.
(F) Li
 
Advanced BioMEMS and Bionanotechnology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 221 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3A, Physics 7A and 7B, Electrical Engineering 143 or equivalent.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 221 after taking 121.
Description: Biophysical and chemical principles of biomedical devices, bionanotechnology, bionanophotonics, and biomedical microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS). Topics include basics of nano-& microfabrication, soft-lithography, DNA arrays, protein arrays, electrokinetics, electrochemical transducers, microfluidic devices, biosensor, point of care diagnostics, lab-on-a-chip, drug delivery microsystems, clinical lab-on-a-chip, advanced biomolecular probes, biomolecular spectroscopy, and etc.
(F) L. Lee
 
BioMEMS and BioNanotechnology Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 221L [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of laboratory and two hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 102 or 104; 22/22L or Molecular and Cell Biology C100A/Chemistry C130 or equivalent.
Description: Students will become familiar with BioMEMS and Lab-on-a-Chip research. Students will design and fabricate their own novel micro- or nano-scale device to address a specific problem in biotechnology using the latest micro- and nano-technological tools and fabrication techniques. This will involve an intensive primary literature review, experimental design, and quantitative data analysis. Results will be presented during class presentations and at a final poster symposium.
(F,SP) Dueck, L. Lee
 
Advanced Structural Aspects of Biomaterials  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C222 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Mechanical Engineering C85 or Bioengineering 102 or equivalent courses.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for C222 after taking C117 or Mechanical Engineering C117.
Description: This course covers the structure and mechanical functions of load bearing tissues and their replacements. Biocompatibility of biomaterials and host response to structural implants are examined. Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and constitutive relationships of materials are covered in order to design implants for structural function. Material selection for load bearing applications including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics, dentistry, and cardiology are addressed. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C215.
(F,SP)
 
Polymer Engineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C223 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Civil and Environmental Engineering 130 or 130N, Engineering 45.
Description: A survey of the structure and mechanical properties of advanced engineering polymers. Topics include rubber elasticity, viscoelasticity, mechanical properties, yielding, deformation, and fracture mechanisms of various classes of polymers. The course will discuss degradation schemes of polymers and long-term performance issues. The class will include polymer applications in bioengineering and medicine. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C223.
(F) Staff
 
Introduction to Computational Molecular and Cellular Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 231 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 231 after taking 131.
Description: Topics include computational approaches and techniques to gene structure and genome annotation, sequence alignment using dynamic programming, protein domain analysis, RNA folding and structure prediction, RNA sequence design for synthetic biology, genetic and biochemical pathways and networks, UNIX and scripting languages, basic probability and information theory. Various "case studies" in these areas are reviewed and web-based computational biology tools will be used by students and programming projects will be given.
(F) Holmes
 
Genetic Devices  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 232 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Engineering 7 or Computer Science 61A, Mathematics 54, Chemistry 3A, and Chemistry C130/Molecular and Cell Biology C100A.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 232 after taking 132.
Description: This graduate-level course is a comprehensive survey of genetic devices. These DNA-based constructs are comprised of multiple "parts" that together encode a higher-level biological behavior and perform useful human-defined functions. Such constructs are the engineering target for most projects in synthetic biology. Included within this class of constructs are genetic circuits, sensors, biosynthetic pathways, and microbiological functions.
(F) Anderson
 
Frontiers in Microbial Systems Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 235 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Designed for graduates with background in differential equations and probability. Course work in molecular cell biology or biochemistry helpful.
Description: This course is aimed at graduate and advanced undergraduate students from the (bio) engineering and chemo-physical sciences interested in a research-oriented introduction to current topics in systems biology. Focusing mainly on two well studied microbiological model systems--the chemotaxis network and Lambda bacteriophage infection--the class systematically introduces key concepts and techniques for biological network deduction, modelling, analysis, evolution and synthetic network design. Students analyze the impact of approaches from the quantitative sciences--such as deterministic modelling, stochastic processes, statistics, non-linear dynamics, control theory, information theory, graph theory, etc.--on understanding biological processes, including (stochastic) gene regulation, signalling, network evolution, and synthetic network design. The course aims identify unsolved problems and discusses possible novel approaches while encouraging students to develop ideas to explore new directions in their own research.
(F) Arkin, Bischofs-Pfeifer, Wolf
 
Probabilistic Modeling in Computational Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 241 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 53 and 54 or equivalent; Molecular and Cell Biology C100A/C102 or equivalent; programming class or consent of instructor.
Description: This course reviews the statistical and algorithmic foundations of bioinformatics viewed through the lens of paleogenetics, the science of "Jurassic Park", i.e., the reconstruction of ancient genes and genomes by reverse Bayesian inference under various stochastic models of molecular evolution. Such methods, first proposed in the 1960s by Linus Pauling (and others), are now in reach of practical experimentation due to the falling cost of DNA synthesis technology. Applications of these methods are granting insight into the origin of life and of the human species, and may be powerful tools of synthetic biology. Lectures will review the theoretical content; homework and laboratory exercises will involve writing and applying programs for computational reconstruction of ancient protein and DNA sequences and other measurably evolving entities, both biological (e.g., gene families) and otherwise (e.g., natural language).
(SP) Holmes
 
Computational Methods in Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 243 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory, and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Mathematics 53 and 54; programming experience preferred but not required.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 243 after taking 143.
Description: An introduction to biophysical simulation methods and algorithms, including molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo, mathematical optimization, and "non-algorithmic" computation such as neural networks. Various case studies in applying these areas in the areas of protein folding, protein structure prediction, drug docking, and enzymatics will be covered. Core Specialization: Core B (Informatics and Genomics); Core D (Computational Biology); Bioengineering Content: Biological.
(F) Head-Gordon
 
Introduction to Protein Informatics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C244 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell Biology C100A or 102 or similar background in Molecular Biology.
Description: This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of molecular biology, and to the bioinformatics tools and databases used for the prediction of protein function and structure. It is designed to impart both a theoretical understanding of popular computational methods, as well as some experience with protein sequence analysis methods applied to real data. This class includes no programming, and no programming background required. Also listed as Plant and Microbial Biology C244.
(F) Sjolander
 
Protein Informatics Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C244L [3 units]
Course Format: Nine hours of laboratory and one hour of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Bioengineering C244/Plant and Microbial Biology C244.
Description: This course is intended to introduce students to a variety of bioinformatics techniques that are used to predict protein function and structure. It is designed to be taken concurrently with C244 (which provides the theoretical foundations for the methods used in the laboratory class), although students can petition to take this laboratory course separately. No programming is performed in this class, and no prior programming experience is required. Also listed as Plant and Microbial Biology C244L.
(F) Sjolander
 
Principles of Synthetic Biology  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 247 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Math 53 and 54; Molecular and Cell Biology C100A/Chemistry C130; or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 247 after taking 147.
Description: The field of synthetic biology is quickly emerging as potentially one of the most important and profound ways by which we can understand and manipulate our physical world for desired purposes. In this course, the field and its natural scientific and engineering basis are introduced. Relevant topics in cellular and molecular biology and biophysics, dynamical and engineering systems, and design and operation of natural and synthetic circuits are covered in a concise manner that then allows the student to begin to design new biology-based systems.
(F) Arkin
 
Bioenergy and Sustainable Chemical Synthesis: Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology Approaches  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 248 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3A and Molecular and Cell Biology C100A/Chemistry C130A or equivalent.
Description: This course will cover metabolic engineering and the various synthetic biology approaches for optimizing pathway performance. Use of metabolic engineering to produce biofuels and general "green technology" will be emphasized since these aims are currently pushing these fields. The course is meant to be a practical guide for metabolic engineering and the related advances in synthetic biology as well the related industrial research and opportunities.
(F,SP) Dueber
 
Micro/Nanofluidics for Bioengineering and Lab-On-A-Chip  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 251 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 3B, Physics 7B, Bioengineering 102, or Mechanical Engineering 106 or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 251 after taking 151.
Description: Introduction and in-depth treatment of theory relevant to fluid flow in microfluidic and nanofluidic systems supplemented by critical assessment of recent applications drawn from the literature. Topics include low Reynolds Number flow, mass transport including diffusion phenomena, and emphasis on electrokinetic systems and bioanalytical applications of said phenomena.
(SP) Herr
 
Medical Imaging Signals and Systems  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C261 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: El Eng 20N and Engineering 7 or equivalent. Knowledge of Matlab or linear algebra assumed.
Description: Biomedical imaging is a clinically important application of engineering, applied mathematics, physics, and medicine. In this course, we apply linear systems theory and basic physics to analyze X-ray imaging, computerized tomography, nuclear medicine, and MRI. We cover the basic physics and instrumentation that characterizes medical image as an ideal perfect-resolution image blurred by an impulse response. This material could prepare the student for a career in designing new medical imaging systems that reliably detect small tumors or infarcts. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C261.
(F,SP) Conolly
 
Principles of Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 263 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 102 or consent of instructor, and Chemistry 3A and Physics 7B.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 263 after taking 163.
Description: Topics in the emerging field of biophotonics with an emphasis on fluorescence spectroscopy, biosensors, and devices for optical imaging and detection of biomolecules. The course will cover the photophysics and photochemistry of organic molecules, the design and characterization of biosensors, and their applications within diverse environments, ranging from the detection of single molecules in vitro and in cells to studies of detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of specific health conditions and disease.
(SP) Marriott
 
Molecular and Cellular Biophotonics Laboratory  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 263L [4 units]
Course Format: Six hours of laboratory and two hours of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 263; experience in a research lab and consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for 263L after taking 163L.
Description: This course provides undergraduate and graduate bioengineering students with an opportunity to acquire essential experimental skills in fluorescence spectroscopy and the design, evaluation, and optimization of optical biosensors for quantitative measurements of proteins and their targets. Groups of students will be responsible for the research, design, and development of a biosensor or diagnostic device for the detection, diagnosis, and monitoring of a specific biomarker(s).
(F) Marriott
 
Principles of Magnetic Resonance Imaging  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C265 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture, three hours of laboratory, and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Either Electrical Engineering 120 or Bioengineering C165/Electrical Engineering C145B or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Bioengineering C265/El Engineering C225E after taking El Engineering 265.
Description: Fundamentals of MRI including signal-to-noise ratio, resolution, and contrast as dictated by physics, pulse sequences, and instrumentation. Image reconstruction via 2D FFT methods. Fast imaging reconstruction via convolution-back projection and gridding methods and FFTs. Hardware for modern MRI scanners including main field, gradient fields, RF coils, and shim supplies. Software for MRI including imaging methods such as 2D FT, RARE, SSFP, spiral and echo planar imaging methods. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C225E.
(F,SP) Lustig, Conolly
 
Occupational Biomechanics  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C279 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture/fieldwork per week.
Description: Overview of ergonomics and occupational biomechanics. Course covers pathophysiology and risk factors of upper extremity and back loading at work, measurement of force and posture, models for risk assessment, anthropometry applied to task and workstation design, tool design, and structure of successful ergonomics programs. Students will conduct a detailed job analysis and design a workplace intervention. Also listed as Public Health C269C.
(SP) Rempel
 
Ethical and Social Issues in Translational Medicine  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 280 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Open only to students in the Masters of Translational Medicine Graduate program.
Description: This class is designed to introduce MTM students to their professional responsibilities as engineers and translational scientists. By the end of it, students will have experience communicating their ideas appropriately and effectively to their peers, their superiors, and those whom they manage or mentor. We will also discuss methods for having a successful graduate school experience - choosing and working on a project and preparing to meet post-graduate goals. Finally, some of the ethical challenges likely to be met by a working bioengineer will be explored. While this syllabus is meant to be an accurate description of the course and its content, it may be modified at the instructor's discretion.
(F) Johnson, Terry
 
Introduction to Nano-Science and Engineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C280 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Major in physical science such as chemistry, physics, etc., or engineering; consent of advisor or instructor.
Description: A three-module introduction to the fundamental topics of Nano-Science and Engineering (NSE) theory and research within chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering. This course includes quantum and solid-state physics; chemical synthesis, growth fabrication, and characterization techniques; structures and properties of semiconductors, polymer, and biomedical materials on nanoscales; and devices based on nanostructures. Students must take this course to satisfy the NSE Designated Emphasis core requirement. Also listed as Materials Science and Engineering C261, Nanoscale Science and Engineering C201, and Physics C201.
(F,SP) Gronsky, S.W. Lee, Wu
 
The Berkeley Lectures on Energy: Energy from Biomass  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C281 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Biology 1A; Chemistry 1B or 4B, Mathematics 1B.
Credit option: Repeatable when topic changes with consent of instructor.
Description: After an introduction to the different aspects of our global energy consumption, the course will focus on the role of biomass. The course will illustrate how the global scale of energy guides the biomass research. Emphasis will be places on the integration of the biological aspects (crop selection, harvesting, storage, and distribution, and chemical composition of biomass) with the chemical aspects to convert biomass to energy. The course aims to engage students in state-of-art research. Also listed as Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering C295A, Plant and Microbial Biology C224, and Chemistry C238.
(F,SP) Bell, Blanch, Clark, Smit, C. Somerville
 
Advanced Topics in Bioengineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 290 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. One hour of lecture per week per unit.
Description: This course covers current topics of research interest in bioengineering. The course content may vary from semester to semester.
(F,SP)
 
Advanced Technical Communication: Proposals, Patents, and Presentations  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) C290D [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing, and students must have passed their Ph.D. qualifying examination.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This course will help the advanced Ph.D. student further develop critically important technical communication traits via a series of lectures, interactive workshops, and student projects that will address the structure and creation of effective research papers, technical reports, patents, proposals, business plans, and oral presentations. One key concept will be the emphasis on focus and clarity--achieved through critical thinking regarding objectives and context. Examples will be drawn primarily from health care and bioengineering multidisciplinary applications. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C290X.
(SP) Keaveny, Pruitt
 
MTM Capstone Project  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 296 [3 units]
Course Format: Nine hours of independent study per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate status in the MTM program
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Members of the MTM Program Committee will help design several capstone projects in collaboration with clinical, academic, and/or industry partners, aiming to incorporate emerging technologies, industry requirements, and the potential for significant economic or social impact with regard to medicine and health care. All projects will be designed and vetted by the MTM Program Committee and in consultation with the MTM Advisory Board. For each selected project, an Academic Senate member from the Department of Bioengineering or BTS will serve as research adviser.
(F,SP) Li, Song
 
Group Studies, Seminars, or Group Research  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 298 [1-8 units]
Course Format: One to eight hours of directed group study per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Advanced studies in various subjects through special seminars on topics to be selected each year. Informal group studies of special problems, group participation in comprehensive design problems, or group research on complete problems for analysis and experimentation.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Individual Study or Research  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 299 [1-12 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Investigations of advanced problems in bioengineering.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Teaching Techniques for Bioengineering  --  Bioengineering  (BIO ENG) 301 [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Weekly seminars and discussions of effective teaching techniques. Use of educational objectives, alternative forms of instruction, and special techniques for teaching key concepts and techniques in bioengineering. Course is intended to orient new graduate student instructors to teaching in the Bioengineering department at Berkeley.
(F) Johnson
 
General Biology Lecture  --  Biology  (BIOLOGY) 1A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1A and 1AL or equivalent with grade of C- or higher, or a 4 or 5 score on the Chemistry AP test; Chemistry 3A or 112A recommended; Biology 1AL must be taken concurrently (unless exempt by major).
Credit option: 1B may be taken before 1A.
Description: General introduction to cell structure and function, molecular and organismal genetics, animal development, form and function. Intended for biological sciences majors, but open to all qualified students.
(F,SP) Staff
 
General Biology Laboratory  --  Biology  (BIOLOGY) 1AL [2 units]
Course Format: One and one-half hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week.
Prerequisites: 1A must be taken concurrently.
Description: Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course. Intended for biological science majors, but open to all qualified students.
(F,SP) Staff
 
General Biology  --  Biology  (BIOLOGY) 1B [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and four hours of laboratory per week.
Description: General introduction to plant development, form, and function; population genetics, ecology, and evolution. Intended for students majoring in the biological sciences, but open to all qualified students. Students must take both Biology 1A and 1B to complete the sequence. Sponsored by Integrative Biology.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Honors Research in Biophysics  --  Biophysics (BIOPHY) H196 [4 units]
Course Format:
Prerequisites: Upper division standing; minimum GPA 3.2; consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 12 units.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Supervised independent honors research on topics specific to biophysics, followed by brief written report and presentation at year-end student research colloquium.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Research  --  Biophysics (BIOPHY) 292 [3-12 units]
Course Format: Laboratory research, conference.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Individual research under the supervision of a faculty member.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Research Seminar: Faculty Evening Research Presentations (FERPS) and Student Evening Research Presentations (SERPS)  --  Biophysics (BIOPHY) 293A [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 292.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Seminar on presentation and evaluation of results in area of student's individual research interests.
(F) Staff
 
Research Seminar: Faculty Evening Research Presentations (FERPS) and Student Evening Research Presentations (SERPS)  --  Biophysics (BIOPHY) 293B [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: 293A, and 292.
Grading option: Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of sequence. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Seminar on presentation and evaluation of results in area of student's individual research interests.
(SP) Staff
 
Freshman/Sophomore Seminar  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 39 
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Grading option: Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower division students the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all campus departments; topics vary from department to department and from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to the Study of Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 50 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: This course will consider materials drawn from various Buddhist traditions of Asia, from ancient times to the present day. However, it is not intended to be a comprehensive or systematic survey; rather than aiming at breadth, it is designed around key themes such as ritual, image veneration, mysticism, meditation, and death. The overarching emphasis throughout the course will be on the hermeneutic difficulties attendant upon the study of religion in general, and Buddhism in particular.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Introduction to the Study of Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C50 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: This introduction to the study of Buddhism will consider materials drawn from various Buddhist traditions of Asia, from ancient times down to the present day. However, the course is not intended to be a comprehensive or systematic survey; rather than aiming at breadth, the course is designed around key themes such as ritual, image veneration, mysticism, meditation, and death. The overarching emphasis throughout the course will be on the hermeneutic difficulties attendant upon the study of religion in general, and Buddhism in particular. Also listed as South and Southeast Asian Studies C52 and East Asian Languages and Cultures C50.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Tibetan Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 114 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course is a broad introduction to the history, doctrine, and culture of the Buddhism of Tibet. We will begin with the introduction of Buddhism to Tibet in the eighth century and move on to the evolution of the major schools of Tibetan Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhist literature, ritual and monastic practice, the place of Buddhism in Tibetan political history and the contemporary situation of Tibetan Buddhism both inside and outside Tibet.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Tibetan Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C114 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course is a broad introduction to the history, doctrine, and culture of the Buddhism of Tibet. We will begin with the introduction of Buddhism to Tibet in the eighth century and move on to the evolution of the major schools of Tibetan Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhist literature, ritual and monastic practice, the place of Buddhism in Tibetan political history, and the contemporary situation of Tibetan Buddhism both inside and outside of Tibet. Also listed as Tibetan C114 and South Asian C114.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Japanese Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C115 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: A critical survey of the main themes in the history of Japanese Buddhism as they are treated in modern scholarship. The course covers the transmission of Buddhism from China and Korea to Japan; the subsequent evolution in Japan of the Tendai, Shingon, Pure Land, Nichiren, and Zen schools of Buddhism; the organization and function of Buddhist institutions (monastic and lay) in Japanese society; the interaction between Buddhism and other modes of religious belief and practice prevalent in Japan, notably those that go under the headings of "Shinto" and "folk religion." Also listed as Japanese C115.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Buddhism in China  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C116 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course is an introduction to the history of Buddhism in China from its beginnings in the early centuries CE to the present day. Through engagment with historical scholarship, primary sources in translation, and Chinese Buddhist art, we will explore the intellectual history and cultural impact of Buddhism in China. Students will also be introduced to major issues in the institutional history of Buddhism, the interactions between Buddhism and indigenous Chinese religions, and the relationship between Buddhism and the state. Previous study of Buddhism is helpful but not required. Also listed as Chinese C116.
(F,SP)
 
Buddhism on the Silk Road  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C120 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will discuss the social, economic, and cultural aspects of Buddhism as it moved along the ancient Eurasian trading network referred to as the "Silk Road". Instead of relying solely on textual sources, the course will focus on material culture as it offers evidence concerning the spread of Buddhism. Through an examination of the Buddhist archaeological remains of the Silk Road, the course will address specific topics, such as the symbiotic relationship between Buddhism and commerce; doctrinal divergence; ideological shifts in the iconography of the Buddha; patronage (royal, religious and lay); Buddhism and political power; and art and conversion. All readings will be in English. Also listed as East Asian Languages and Cultures C120.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Buddhist Meditation: Historical, Doctrinal, and Ethnographic Perspectives  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C122 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: This course will explore the nature and function of Buddhist meditation as it developed within various Buddhist traditions of South, Southeast, and East Asia. Emphasis will be on the historical evolution, doctrinal foundations, and monastic and extra-monastic regimens associated with Buddhist meditation practices. We will make use of a wide variety of primary and secondary readings as well as visual materials (including films) to attempt to place the historical and doctrinal accounts within their cultural and institutional contexts.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Buddhism and the Environment  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C126 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: One lower-division course in Buddhist Studies or consent of instructor.
Description: A thematic course on Buddhist perspectives on nature and Buddhist responses to environmental issues. The first half of the course focuses on East Asian Buddhist cosmological and doctrinal perspectives on the place of the human in nature and the relationship between the salvific goals of Buddhism and nature. The second half of the course examines Buddhist ethics, economics, and activism in relation to environmental issues in contemporary Southeast Asia, East Asia, and America. Also listed as East Asian Languages and Cultures C126.
(F,SP)
 
Buddhism in Contemporary Society  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C128 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Description: A study of the Buddhist tradition as it is found today in Asia. The course will focus on specific living traditions of East, South, and/or Southeast Asia. Themes to be addressed may include contemporary Buddhist ritual practices; funerary and mortuary customs; the relationship between Buddhism and other local religious traditions; the relationship between Buddhist institutions and the state; Buddhist monasticism and its relationship to the laity; Buddhist ethics; Buddhist "modernism," and so on. Also listed as South and Southeast Asian Studies C145 and East Asian Languages and Cultures C128.
(F,SP) von Rospatt
 
Zen Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C130 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
Prerequisites: One lower division course in Asian religion recommended.
Description: This course will introduce students to the Zen Buddhist traditions of China and Japan, drawing on a variety of disciplinary perspectives (history, anthropology, philosophy, and so on). The course will also explore a range of hermeneutic problems (problems involved in interpretation) entailed in understanding a sophisticated religious tradition that emerged in a time and culture very different from our own. Also listed as East Asian Languages and Cultures C130.
(F,SP) Sharf
 
Pure Land Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C132 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will discuss the historical development of the Pure Land school of East Asian Buddhism, the largest form of Buddhism practiced today in China and Japan. The curriculum is divided into India, China, and Japan sections, with the second half of the course focusing exclusively on Japan where this form of religious culture blossomed most dramatically, covering the ancient, medieval, and modern periods. The curriculum will begin with a reading of the core scriptures that form the basis of the belief system and then move into areas of cultural expression. The course will follow two basic trajectories over the centuries: doctrine/philosophy and culture/society. Also listed as East Asian Languages and Cultures C132.
(F,SP) Blum
 
Tantric Traditions of Asia  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C135 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: One course in Buddhist Studies or consent of instructor.
Description: The emergence of the tantras in seventh and eighth-century India marked a watershed for religious practice throughout Asia. These esoteric scriptures introduced complex new ritual technologies that transformed the religious traditions of India, from Brahmanism to Jainism and Buddhism, as well as those of Southeast Asia, Tibet, Mongolia, China, Korea, and Japan. This course provides an overview of tantric religion across these regions. Also listed as South and Southeast Asian Studies C135 and East Asian Languages and Cultures C135.
(F,SP) Dalton
 
Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C140 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Chinese 110A; or one semester of classical Chinese. Prior background in Buddhist history and thought is helpful, but not required.
Description: This course is an introduction to the study of medieval Buddhist literature written in classical Chinese. We will read samples from a variety of genres, including early Chinese translations of Sanskrit and Central Asian Buddhist scriptures, indigenous Chinese commentaries, philosophical treatises, and sectarian works, including Chan gongan (Zen koans). The course will also serve as an introduction to resource materials used in the study of Chinese Buddhist texts, and students will be expected to make use of a variety of reference tools in preparation for class. Readings in Chinese will be supplemented by a range of secondary readings in English on Mahayana doctrine and Chinese Buddhist history. Also listed as Chinese C140.
(F,SP)
 
Introductory Readings in Japanese Buddhist Texts  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C141 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Japanese 120. One semester of classical Japanese. Prior background in Buddhist history and thought is helpful, but not required.
Description: This course is an introduction to the study of medieval Buddhist literature written in Classical Japanese in its wabun (aka bungo) and kanbun forms (including kakikudashi). The class will read samples from a variety of genres, including material written in China that are read in an idiosyncratic way in Japan. Reading materials will include Chinese translations of Sanskrit and Central Asian Buddhist scriptures, scriptural commentaries written in China and Korea, Japanese subcommentaries on influential Chinese and Korean commentaries, philosophical treatises, hagiography, apologetics, histories, doctrinal letters, preaching texts, and setsuwa literature. This course is intended for students who already have some facility in literary Japanese. Also listed as Japanese C141.
(F,SP) Blum
 
Death, Dreams, and Visions in Tibetan Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 154 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Tibetan Buddhists view the moment of death as a rare opportunity for transformation. This course examines how Tibetans have used death and dying in the path to enlightment. Readings will address how Tibetan funerary rituals work to assist the dying toward this end, and how. Buddhist practioners prepare for this crucial moment through tantric meditation, imaginative rehearsals, and explorations of the dream state.
(F,SP) Dalton
 
Death, Dreams, and Visions in Tibetan Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C154 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Tibetan Buddhists view the moment of death as a rare opportunity for transformation. This course examines how Tibetans have used death and dying in the path to enlightenment. Readings will address how Tibetan funerary rituals work to assist the dying toward this end, and how Buddhist practitioners prepare for this crucial moment through tantric meditation, imaginative rehearsals, and explorations of the dream state. Also listed as Tibetan C154 and South Asian C154.
(F,SP) Dalton
 
Topics in the Study of Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 190 [4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Some prior study of Buddhism or Asian culture is recommended.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: This course will focus on specific themes, developments, and issues in the study of Buddhism. The course is intended to supplement our regular curricular offerings, and the content will change from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Directed Group Study  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 198 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of directed group study per week.
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Small group instruction not covered by regularly scheduled courses.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Independent Study  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 199 [1-4 units]
Course Format: One to four hours of independent study per week.
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog.
Grading option: Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Description: Independent study in topics not covered by regularly scheduled courses.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Proseminar in Buddhist Studies  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 200 [1 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar every three to four weeks.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the Buddhist Studies Ph.D. program or consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: This seminar provides an opportunity for all students and faculty in the Group in Buddhist Studies to gather together on a regular basis to discuss recent theoretically significant works in the field of Buddhist Studies, as well as pertinent and important works in related disciplines (anthropology, art history, literature, history, philosophy, and religious studies). The content of the course will be adjusted from semester to semester so as to best accommodate the needs and interest of the students, but the focus will be on recent works representing the "state of the field."
(F,SP) Staff
 
Seminar in Tibetan Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C214 [2,4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course provides a place for graduate-level seminars in Tibetan Buddhism that rely primarily on secondary sources and Tibetan texts in translation. Content will vary between semesters but will typically focus on a particular theme. Themes will be chosen according to student interests, with an eye toward introducing students to the breadth of available western scholarship on Tibet, from classics in the field to the latest publications. Also listed as Tibetan C214 and South Asian C214.
(F,SP) Dalton
 
Readings in Indian Buddhist Texts  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C215 [2-4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Formerly South Asian C215A/Group in Buddhist Studies C215A
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit. Students will receive no credit for South Asian C215/ Group in Buddhist Studies C215 after completing South Asian 215A, or South Asian C215A/Group in Buddhist Studies C215A.
Description: This graduate seminar focuses on reading a wide spectrum of Indian Buddhist texts in the Sanskrit (or Pali) original introducing the students to different genres, and different aspects of Indian Buddhism. The students taking the course for two units (rather than four) will be expected to prepare thoroughly every week for the reading of Buddhist texts in the original. They will also be expected to read all related secondary literature that is assigned to supplement the study of the primary source material. In contrast to the students taking the course for four units, they will not be expected to write a term paper or to prepare special presentations for class. Also listed as South Asian C215.
(F,SP) Rospatt
 
Seminar in Buddhism and Buddhist Texts  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 220 [2,4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: Content varies with student interest and needs. The course will normally focus on classical Buddhist texts that exist in multiple recensions and languages, including Chinese, Sanskrit, and Tibetan.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Seminar in Buddhism and Buddhist Texts  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C220 [2,4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Content varies with student interests. The course will normally focus on classical Buddhist texts that exist in multiple recensions and languages, including Chinese, Sanskrit, and Tibetan. Also listed as South and Southeast Asian Studies C220 and East Asian Languages and Cultures C220.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C223 [2,4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
Description: This seminar is an intensive introduction to various genres of Buddhist literature in classical Chinese, including translations of Sanskrit and Central Asian scriptures. Chinese commentaries, philosophical treatises, hagiographies, and sectarian works. It is intended for graduate students who already have some facility in classical Chinese. It will also serve as a tools and methods course, covering the basic reference works and secondary scholarship in the field of East Asian Buddhism. The content of the course will be adjusted from semester to semester to best accommodate the needs and interests of students. Also listed as Chinese C223.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Readings in Tibetan Buddhist Texts  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C224 [2,4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Description: This seminar provides an introduction to a broad range of Tibetan Buddhist texts, including chronicles and histories, biographical literature, doctrinal treatises, canonical texts, ritual manuals, pilgrimage guides, and liturgical texts. It is intended for graduate students interested in premodern Tibet from any perspective. Students are required to do all of the readings in the original classical Tibetan. It will also serve as a tools and methods for the study of Tibetan Buddhist literature, including standard lexical and bibliographic references, digital resources, and secondary literature in modern languages. The content of the course will vary from semester to semester to account for the needs and interests of particular students. Also listed as Tibetan C224 and South Asian C224.
(F,SP) Dalton
 
Readings in Japanese Buddhist Texts  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) C225 [2,4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This seminar serves as an introduction to a broad range of Japanese Buddhist literature belonging to different historical periods and genres, including liturgical texts; monastic records, rules, and ritual manuals; doctrinal treatises; biographies of monks; and histories of Buddhism in Japan. Students are required to do all the readings in the original languages, which are classical Chinese (Kanbun) and classical Japanese. It will also serve as a tools and methods course, covering basic reference works and secondary scholarship in the field of Japanese Buddhism. The content of the course will be adjusted from semester to semester to accommodate the needs and interests of the students. Also listed as Japanese C225.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Art and Archaeology of Buddhism  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 250 [2,4 units]
Course Format: Three hours of seminar per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This seminar offers a multidisciplinary approach to the origins, development, and diffusion of Buddhist art and archaeology in South, Central and Southeast Asia. Seminar content will vary from year to year depending on faculty and graduate student research interests. Topics may include the early archaeological and numismatic record, aniconic and figurative depictions of the Buddha and Buddhist deities, painted and sculpted narratives, studies of particular sites such as Polunaruva and Angkor, the caves of the Western Deccan, Buddhist Monasteries in the Himalayan region, and so on.
(F,SP)
 
Directed Study for Graduate Students  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 298 [1-8 units]
Course Format: Hours to be arranged.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit as texts vary.
Description: Special tutorial or seminar on selected topics not covered by available courses or seminars.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Thesis Preparation and Related Research  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 299 [1-8 units]
Course Format: Hours to be arranged.
Prerequisites: Consent of thesis supervisor and graduate adviser.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description:
(F,SP) Staff
 
Individual Study for Master's Students  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 601 [1-8 units]
Course Format: One to eight hours of independent study per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of graduate adviser.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Individual study for the comprehensive or language requirements in consultation with the graduate adviser. Units may not be used to meet either unit or residence requirements for a master's degree.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Individual Study for Doctoral Students  --  Buddhist Studies (BUDDSTD) 602 [1-8 units]
Course Format: One to eight hours of independent study per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: Individual study in consultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare for various examinations required of candidates for the Ph.D.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Leadership Communications  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 200C [1 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.
Description: Leadership communication is a workshop in the fundamentals of public speaking in today's business environment. Through prepared and impromptu speeches aimed at moving others to action, peer coaching, and lectures, students will sharpen their authentic and persuasive communication skills, develop critical listening skills, improve abilities to give, receive, and apply feedback, and gain confidence as public speakers.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Problem Finding, Problem Solving  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 200P [1 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week for eight weeks.
Grading option: The course instructor will decide the grading option when the class is scheduled.
Description: Problem Finding, Problem Solving (PFPS) teaches basic skills drawn from the fields of critical thinking, design thinking and systems thinking that support innovation. Specifically, it covers ways of collecting information to characterize a problem, framing and re-framing that problem, coming up with a range of solutions and then gathering feedback to assess those solutions. Following Confucius's notion: "I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand." The class consists primarily of hands-on exercises to experiment with and learn the tools and techniques presented, applying them to the design and testing of alternative business models for start-up and other businesses.
(F,SP)
 
Data and Decisions  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 200S [2 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture and one and one-half hours of discussion for seven weeks.
Description: The objective of this core course is to make students critical consumers of statistical analysis using available software packages. Key concepts include interpretation of regression analysis, model formation and testing, and diagnostic checking.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Economics for Business Decision Making  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 201A [2 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.
Prerequisites: E204.
Formerly Business Administration E201A
Description: This course uses the tools and concepts of microeconomics to analyze decision problems within a business firm. Particular emphasis is placed on the firm's choice of policies in determining prices, inputs usage, and outputs. The effects of the state of the competitive environment on business policies are also examined.
 
Macroeconomics in the Global Economy  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 201B [2 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E201A.
Formerly Business Administration E201B
Description: This course builds on the foundations developed in E201A to develop theories of fiscal policy, monetary policy, and other macro-economic policies. Both the issues and the evidence in connection with these policies will be examined. Other topics covered in the course range from the specifics of the U.S. balance of payments situation to the broader problems associated with economic growth and decay in the world.
 
Financial Reporting  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 202 [2 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.
Formerly Business Administration E202A
Description: Published financial reports provide the most important single set of data on modern organizations. This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of accounting measurements which are necessary for a clear understanding of published financial reports.
 
Introduction to Finance  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 203 [2 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.
Formerly Business Administration E203
Description: This course will examine the wide menu of available assets, the institutional structure of U.S. and international financial markets, and the market mechanisms for trading securities. Topics include discounting, capital budgeting, historical behavior of asset returns, and diversification and portfolio theory. Course will also provide introductions to asset pricing theory for primary and derivative assets and to the principles governing corporate financial arrangements and contracting.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Operations  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 204 [2 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.
Prerequisites: Admission to the program.
Formerly Business Administration E204
Description: An introduction to the application of quantitative methods to management decision problems. Topics include linear programming, probability theory, decision analysis, regression and correlation, and time series analysis.
 
Leading People  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 205 [2 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.
Prerequisites: Admission to the program.
Formerly Business Administration E205
Description: A survey of knowledge about behavior in and of organizations. Covered will be issues of individual behavior, group functioning, and the actions of organizations in their environments. Problems of work motivation, task design, leadership, communication, organizational design, and innovation will be analyzed from multiple theoretical perspectives. Implications for the management of organizations will be illustrated through examples, cases, and exercises.
 
Leadership  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 205L [1 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture for seven weeks.
Description: The objective of this course is to help students develop an understanding of their own strengths and weaknesses as leaders and to nurture their confidence to envision themselves as, and aspire to be, leaders throughout their careers. The course will include four main components: 1) 360-degree assessment and an accompanying leadership self-assessment analysis; 2) live cases run by leaders in organizations; 3) advanced practices about leadership; 4) experiential exercises.
(F,SP)
 
Marketing Organization and Management  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 206 [2 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E200.
Formerly Business Administration E206
Description: Topics include an overview of the marketing system and the marketing concepts, buyer behavior, market research, segmentation and marketing decision making, marketing structures, and evaluation of marketing performance in the economy and society.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Ethics and Responsibility in Business  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 207 [1 units]
Course Format: Four hours of lecture per weekend for four weeks or three hours of lecture per week for five weeks.
Prerequisites: Admission to the program.
Formerly Business Administration E207
Description: A study of basic ideas, concepts, attitudes, rules, and institutions in our society that characterize the legal, political, and social framework within which the system operates.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Strategy, Structure, and Incentives  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 210 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 201A or consent of instructor.
Description: This course uses insights from economics to develop structure, tactics, and incentives to achieve the firm's goals. It develops a framework for analyzing organizational architecture, focusing on the allocation of decision rights, the measurement of performance, and the design of incentives. Includes managing the vertical chain of upstream suppliers and downstream distributors, design and operation of incentive and performance management systems, techniques for dealing with informational asymmetries.
(F,SP)
 
Game Theory  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 211 [1-3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: A survey of the main ideas and techniques of game-theoretic analysis related to bargaining, conflict, and negotiation. Emphasizes the identification and analysis of archetypal strategic situations in bargaining. Goals of the course are to provide a foundation for applying game-theoretic analysis, both formally and intuitively, to negotiation and bargaining; to recognize and assess archetypal strategic situations in complicated negotiation settings; and to feel comfortable in the process of negotiation.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Game Theory (Online Version)  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) W211 [2,3 units]
Course Format: Seven to ten hours of web-based lecture every other week.
Credit option: Students will receive no credit for Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration W211 after taking Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration 211.
Description: A survey of the main ideas and techniques of game-theoretic analysis related to bargaining, conflict, and negotiation. Emphasizes the identification and analysis of archetypal strategic situations in bargaining. Goals of the course are to provide a foundation for applying game-theoretic analysis, both formally and intuitively, to negotiation and bargaining; to recognize and assess archetypal strategic situations in complicated negotiation settings. This course is taught online.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Energy and Environmental Markets  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 212 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of evening lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E201A or equivalent.
Formerly Business Administration E212
Description: Business strategy and public issues in energy and environmental markets. Topics include development and effect of organized spot, futures, and derivative energy markets; political economy of regulation and deregulation; climate change and environmental policies related to energy production and use; cartels, market power and competition policy; pricing of exhaustible resources; competitiveness of alternative energy sources; and transportation and storage of energy commodities.
 
Cleantech to Market  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 212A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: In this course, interdisciplinary teams of graduate students work with scientists from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and across the UCB campus to commercialize new solar, biofuel, battery, and smart grid/energy management technologies. Students are drawn from Business, Engineering, Science, Law, and the Energy and Resources Group. Students explore topics such as: Potential application in multiple markets; alignment with target or desired market(s); distinguishing advantages and disadvantages; customer and user profiles; top competitors; commercialization and scale-up challenges; relevant government policies; revenue potential and cost sensitivities; intellectual property issues; and multiple other related topics.
(F,SP)
 
Business Strategies for Emerging Markets: Management, Investment, and Opportunities  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 215 [1-3 units]
Course Format: One to three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course helps students to study the institutions of emerging markets that are relevant for managers, analyze opportunities presented by emerging markets, analyze the additional ethical challenges and issues of social responsibility common in emerging markets, and learn to minimize the risks in doing business in emerging markets. This course is a combination of lectures, class participation, and cases.
(F,SP)
 
Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 217 [0.5-3 units]
Course Format: One-half to three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced study in the field of economic analysis and policy. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Financial Information Analysis  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 222 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly Business Administration E222
Description: Issues of accounting information evaluation with special emphasis on the use of financial statements by decision makers outside the firm. The implications of recent research in finance and accounting for external reporting issues will be explored. Emphasis will be placed on models that describe the user's decision context.
(SP)
 
Corporate Financial Reporting  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 223 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of evening lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E202B and E203 or equivalent.
Formerly Business Administration E220
Description: Intensive study of the theory and practice of financial accounting. Asset and liability measurement, income determination, financial reporting.
 
Managerial Accounting  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 224A [2 units]
Course Format: Six hours of evening lecture per week for five weeks.
Prerequisites: E204.
Formerly Business Administration E202B
Description: Management is dependent on an information system which provides dependable, timely, and relevant information to all decision makers. The goal of this course is to identify the information needs of managers and to develop the methods by which managerial accountants can provide the necessary data through appropriate budget, cost, and other informational systems.
 
Taxes and Firm Strategy  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 227B [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E202A and E202B or equivalents.
Formerly Business Administration E228
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course will cover various topics in personal or corporate taxation or both. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Corporate Finance  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 231 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E230.
Formerly Business Administration E234
Description: Financial policies of firms including asset acquisition and replacement, capital structure, dividends, working capital, and mergers. Development of theory and application to financial management decisions.
(F,SP)
 
Financial Institutions and Markets  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 232 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of evening lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E201B and E203 or E230.
Formerly Business Administration E232
Description: Structure and operation of the Federal Reserve System commercial bank and non-bank financial institutions. Impact of monetary policy and of public regulation. Portfolio composition amd market behavior of financial intermediaries. Organization and functions of money markets. The structure of yields on financial assets and the influence of financial intermediaries and monetary policy.
 
Investments  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 233 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture and one hour of optional discussion per week.
Prerequisites: 203.
Formerly Business Administration E233
Description: This course will analyze the role of financial markets and financial institutions in allocating capital. The major focus will be on debt contracts and securities and on innovations in the bond and money markets. The functions of commercial banks, investment banks, and other financial intermediaries will be covered, and aspects of the regulation of these institutions will be examined.
(F,SP)
 
Investment Strategies and Styles  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 236B [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E203 plus one additional graduate finance course.
Formerly Business Administration E239
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Introduction to alternative investment strategies and styles as practiced by leading money managers. A money manager will spend approximately half of the class discussing his general investment philosophy. In the other half, students, practitioner, and instructor will explore the investment merits of one particular company. Students will be expected to use the library's resources, class handouts, and their ingenuity to address a set of questions relating to the firm's investment value.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Global Financial Services  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 236C [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Survey of the forces changing and shaping global finance and intermediation, especially the effects of greater ease of communication, deregulation and globalized disciplines expected to continue to be essential to corporate finance and intermediation, e.g., investment analysis, valuation, structured finance/securitization, and derivative applications. The case method is utilized with occasional additional assigned readings and text sources.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Portfolio Management  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 236D [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 203 or consent of instructor.
Description: This course explores the broad range of portfolio management in practice. The class will examine the assets, strategies, characteristics, operations, and concerns unique to each type of portfolio. Practitioners will present descriptions of their businesses as well as methods and strategies that they employ.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Mergers and Acquisitions: A Practical Primer  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 236E [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 203 or consent of instructor.
Description: Survey of the day-to-day practices and techniques used in change of control transaction. Topics include valuation, financing, deal structuring, tax and accounting considerations, agreements, closing documents, practices used in management buyouts, divestitures, hostile takeovers, and takeover defenses. Also covers distinctions in technology M&A, detecting corruption in cross border transaction attempts, and betting on deals through risk arbitrage. Blend of lectures, case studies, and guest lectures.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Behavioral Finance  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 236F [1-3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture for fifteen weeks. Five to fourteen hours of lecture per week for three weeks.
Prerequisites: 203.
Description: This course looks at the influence of decision heuristics and biases on investor welfare, financial markets, and corporate decisions. Topics include overconfidence, attribution theory, representative heuristic, availability heuristic, anchoring and adjustment, prospect theory, "Winner's Curse," speculative bubbles, IPOs, market efficiency, limits of arbitrage, relative mis-pricing of common stocks, the tendency to trade in a highly correlated fashion, investor welfare, and market anomalies.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Designing Financial Models that Work  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 236G [1,2 units]
Course Format: One to two hours of lecture for fourteen weeks.
Prerequisites: 203 or consent of instructor.
Description: Spreadsheet financial models are often too big, complicated, and buggy to help people. In this course, students learn to design financial models that work because they're small (fit on a screen or two), straightforward (involve basic math), clear (a non-MBA can follow them readily), and fast to build. These simple yet powerful representations of the cash flow for a new product/deal/venture help people share their vision, recognize tradeoffs, brainstorm possibilities, and make decisions.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Financial Statement Modeling for Finance Careers  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 236H [1,2 units]
Course Format: One to two hours of lecture per week for 15 weeks. One and one-half to three hours of lecture per week for ten weeks. Two to three and one-half hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. Two and one-half to five hours of lecture per week for six weeks.
Prerequisites: 203 or consent of instructor.
Description: Spreadsheet financial models are often too big, complicated, and buggy to help people. In this course, students learn to design financial models that work because they're small (fit on a screen or two), straightforward (involve basic math), clear (a non-MBA can follow them readily), and fast to build. These simple yet powerful representations of the cash flow for a new product/deal/venture help people share their vision, recognize tradeoffs, brainstorm possibilities, and make decisions.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Topics in Finance  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 237 [0.5-3 units]
Course Format: One-half to three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced study in the field of Finance. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP)
 
Risk Management via Optimization and Simulation  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 240 [1 units]
Course Format: Seven hours of lecture for two weeks.
Prerequisites: 203 and 204, or consent of instructor.
Description: Survey of the formulation, solution, and interpretation of mathematical models to assist management of risk. Emphasis on applications from diverse businesses and industries, including inventory management, product distribution, portfolio optimization, portfolio insurance, and yield management. Two types of models are covered: optimization and simulation. Associated with each model type is a piece of software: Excel's Solver for optimization and Excel add-in Crystal Ball for simulation.
(F,SP)
 
Service Strategy  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 246A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 204 or Master of Business Administration 204 or consent of instructor.
Description: This course is designed to teach general management principles involved in the planning, execution, and management of service businesses. It covers both strategic and tactical aspects, including the development of a strategic service vision, building employee loyalty, developing customer loyalty and satisfaction, improving productivity and service quality, service innovation, and the role of technology in services. Blend of case studies, group projects, class discussions, and selected readings.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Topics in Operations and Information Technology Management  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 247 [0.5-3 units]
Course Format: One-half to three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly Eve/Wknd Masters in Bus. Adm. 247A
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced study in the field of Manufacturing and Operations. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP)
 
Supply Chain Management  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 248A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 204 or Master of Business Administration 204 or equivalent.
Description: Supply chain management concerns the flow of materials and information in multistage production and distribution networks. This course provides knowledge of organizational models and analytical decision support tools necessary to design, implement, and sustain successful supply chain strategies. Topics include demand and supply management, inventory management, supplier-buyer coordination via incentives, vendor management, and the role of information technology in supply chain management.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Negotiations and Conflict Resolution  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 252 [2,3 units]
Course Format: Two to three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The purpose of this course is for students to understand the theory and processes of negotiation so that they can negotiate successfully in a variety of settings. This course is designed to complement the technical and diagnostic skills learned in other courses in the MBA program.
(F,SP)
 
Power and Politics in Organizations  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 254 [2,3 units]
Course Format: Two to three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will provide students with a sense of "political intelligence." After taking this course, students will be able to: (1) diagnose the true distribution of power in organizations, (2) identify strategie for building sources of power, (3) develop techniques for influencing others, (4) understand the role of power in building cooperation and leading change in organizations, and (5) make sense of others' attempts to influence them. These skills are essential for effective and satisfying career building.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Power and Politics in Organizations  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) W254 [2 units]
Course Format: Four hours of web-based lecture for eight weeks.
Prerequisites: Master of Business Administration 205.
Description: This course will provide students with a sense of "political intelligence," enabling them to: 1) Diagnose the true distribution of power in organizations, 2) Identify strategies for building sources of power, 3) Develop techniques for influencing others, 4) Understand the role of power in building cooperation and leading change, and 5) Make sense of others' attempts to influence them. This is an online course, utilizing multiple media and providing flexibility in when and how students learn.
(F,SP) Anderson
 
Leadership  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 255 [1-3 units]
Course Format: One to three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course will increase your awareness of your own strengths and opportunities for improvement while gaining an understanding of the qualities essential to being an extraordinary leader. By the end of the course, we are hoping that you will have: Increased your understanding of what distinguishes between more and less successful leaders and construct a plan for your own development as a leader; sharpened your ability to diagnose situations and determine how you can add value; gained experience and confidence in leadership situations, such as dealing with difficult people and inspiring others to accomplish shared team and organizational goals; and developed the ability to accept and leverage feedback and offer useful feedback to others.
(F,SP)
 
Global Leadership  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 256 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Practical skills for global managers. Examines common issues and best practices for managing a global workforce and customer/partner relations. Generic cross-border management issues are discussed along with specific skill areas such as establishing credibility, building relationships, obtaining information, evaluating people, giving and receiving feedback, leading a virtual team, marketing and selling, transferring knowledge, and managing change. Skill areas are applied and adapted to key growth markets in Asia, EMEA, and the Americas, with numerous examples from leading global companies.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in the Management of Organizations  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 257 [0.5-3 units]
Course Format: One-half to three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced study in the field of Organizational Behavior and Industrial Relations. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP)
 
International Business: Designing Global Organizations  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 258A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 205.
Description: This course is about flexible organizational designs and adaptive leadership strategies in global markets. It will be of special interest to students working in high tech, life sciences and biotechnology, telecommunications, management consulting, and financial services. Topics include new trends in global organizational design, leading geo-dispersed teams of knowledge workers, managing offshore partnerships, integrating acquisitions, and executing change with multicultural knowledge workers.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Consumer Insights  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 260 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E206 or equivalent.
Formerly Business Administration E260
Description: Examines concepts and theories from behavioral science useful for the understanding and prediction of marketplace behavior and demand analysis. Emphasizes applications to the development of marketing policy planning and strategy and to various decision areas within marketing.
(F,SP)
 
Marketing Research: Tools and Techniques for Data Collection and Analysis  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 261 [2-3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration 200 or comparable statistical course.
Formerly Business Administration E261
Description: This course develops the skills necessary to plan and implement an effective market research study. Topics include research design, psychological measurement, survey methods, experimentation, statistical analysis of marketing data, and effective reporting of technical material to management. Students select a client and prepare a market research study during the course. Course intended for students with substantive interests in marketing.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Strategic Brand Management  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 262 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E206.
Formerly Business Administration E262A
Description: The focus of this course is on developing student skills to formulate and critique complete marketing programs including product, price, distribution, and promotion policies. Case analyses are heavily used. The course is designed primarily for students who will take a limited number of advanced marketing courses and wish an integrated approach.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Marketing Analytics  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 263 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E206.
Formerly Business Administration E262B
Description: Information technology has allowed firms to gather and process large quantities of information about consumers' choices and reactions to marketing campaigns. However, few firms have the expertise to intelligently act on such information. This course addresses this shortcoming by teaching students how to use customer information to better market to consumers. In addition, the course addresses how information technology affects marketing strategy.
(F,SP) Staff
 
High Technology Marketing Management  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 264 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E206 or equivalent.
Formerly Business Administration E264
Description: High technology refers to that class of products and services which is subject to technological change at a pace significantly faster than for most goods in the economy. Under such circumstances, the marketing task faced by the high technology firm differs in some ways from the usual. The purpose of this course is to explore these differences.
(SP) Staff
 
Influencing Customers  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 265 [2-3 units]
Course Format: Two to three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Eve/Wklnd Masters Bus Adm 206 or equivalent.
Description: A specialized course in advertising, focusing on management and decision-making. Topics include objective-setting, copy decisions, media decisions, budgeting, and examination of theories, models, and other research methods appropriate to these decision areas. Other topics include social/economic issues of advertising by nonprofit organizations.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Channels of Distribution  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 266 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly Business Administration E266
Description: The success of any marketing program often weighs heavily upon its co-execution by members of the firm's distribution channel. This course seeks to provide an understanding of how the strategic and tactical roles of the channel can be identified and managed. This is accomplished, first, through studying the broad economic and social forces that govern the channel evolution. It is completed through the examination of tools t000elect, manage, and motivate channel partners.
(F,SP)
 
Topics in Marketing  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 267 [0.5-3 units]
Course Format: One-half to three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced study in the field of Marketing. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP)
 
International Marketing  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 268B [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Provides frameworks, knowledge; and sensitivities to formulate and implement marketing strategies for competing in the international arena. Regions and countries covered include the Americas, Europe, Japan, China, India, Russia, Africa, and Asia-Pacific. Issues covered include global versus local advertising, international pricing strategies, selecting and managing strategic international alliances and distribution channels, managing international brands and product lines through product life cycle, international retailing, and internatiional marketing organization and control.
(F,SP)
 
Social Media Marketing  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 268C [1-3 units]
Course Format: One to three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The course covers the implications of the evolution of communication on marketing strategy in the new landscape where traditional and digital media coexist and interact. While advertising spending on traditional media has recently declined, increasing amounts are spent online in addition to unpaid media. These new communication channels, however, are presenting significant challenges to marketers in selecting the best strategies to maximize returns. The course covers a number of topics including, but not limited to: The differences and interaction between traditional and social media; two-sided markets and social media platforms; a basic theory of social networks online and offline; consumer behavior and digital media.
(F,SP)
 
Pricing  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 269 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This three-module course aims to equip students with proven concepts, techniques, and frameworks for assessing and formulating pricing strategies. The first module develops the economic and behavorial foundations of pricing. The second module discusses several innovative pricing concepts including price customization, nonlinear pricing, price matching, and product line pricing. The third module analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of several Internet-based, buyer-determined pricing models.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Dynamic Capabilities  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 273 [2-3 units]
Course Format: Three to four hours of lecture per week.
Description: This is a course in strategic management. It draws on a variety of disciplines and integrates them in the fashion that will generate key insights into how technology can be developed and managed. This course will help students acquire and practice concepts and skills that are relevant to management in a technologically dynamic environment. It provides frameworks for intellectual capital management in the private sector. This course is aimed at those interested in working for either large or small firms in technologically progressive industries, as well as those wishing to understand how mature industries can create and respond to innovation.
(F,SP)
 
Business Law: Managing the Legal Environment  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 275 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Completion of all core courses or consent of instructor.
Description: A manager must understand the legal environments which impact business and understand how to work effectively with lawyers. This course addresses the legal aspects of business relationships and business agreements. Topics covered include forms of business organization, duties of officers and directors, intellectual property, antitrust, contracts, employment relationships, criminal law, and debtor-creditor relationships including bankruptcy.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Special Topics in Business and Public Policy  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 277 [1-3 units]
Course Format: One to three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E207 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.
Formerly Business Administration E278
Description: Topics vary by semester at discretion of instructor and by student demand. Topical areas include business and professional ethics and the role of corporate social responsibility in the mixed economy; managing the external affairs of the corporation, including community, government, media and stakeholder relations; technology policy, research and development, and the effects of government regulation of business on technological innovation and adoption.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Real Estate Investment and Market Analysis  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 280 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly Business Administration E280
Description: Intensive review of literature in the theory of land utilization, urban growth and real estate market behavior; property rights and valuation; residential and non-residential markets; construction, debt and equity financing; public controls and policies.
 
Real Estate Development  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 282 [3 units]
Course Format: Three and one-half hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Formerly Business Administration 282
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: The interaction of the private and public sectors in urban development; modeling the urban economy; growth and decline of urban areas; selected policy issues: housing, transportation, financing, local government, urban redevelopment, and neighborhood change are examined.
(F) Staff
 
Real Estate Finance and Securitization  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 283 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E280; and background in the basics of finance, micro-economics, macro-economics, statistics and quantitative analysis.
Formerly Business Administration E283
Description: Students will be introduced to the fundamentals of real estate financial analysis, including elements of mortgage financing and taxation. The course will apply the standard tools of financial analysis to specialized real estate financing circumstances and real estate evaluation.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Real Estate Investment Strategy  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 284 [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Formerly Business Administration E284
Description: Analysis of selected problems and special studies; cases in residental and non-residental development and financing, urban redevelopment, real estate taxation, mortgage market developments, equity investment, valuation, and zoning.
 
Special Topics in Real Estate Economics and Finance  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 287 [1-3 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week per unit.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E280 and consent of instructor.
Formerly Business Administration E281
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Topics vary each semester. Topic areas include advanced techniques for real estate financial analysis and structuring and evaluation; the securitization of real estate debt and equity; issues in international real estate; cyclical behavior of real estate markets; portfolio theory and real estate asset allocation.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Biotechnology Industry Perspectives and Business Development  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 290B [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course is designed to examine the strategic issues that confront the management of the development-stage biotech company, i.e., after its startup via an initial capital infusion, but before it might be deemed successful, or otherwise has achieved "first-tier" status. The intention is to study the biotech organization during the process of its growth and maturation from an early-stage existence through "adolescence" into an early-stage existence.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Haas@Work  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 290H [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: The primary objective of this course and the associated innovation consulting projects is for students to learn and apply the approaches, skills, and behaviors required to successfully initiate and drive innovation in a complex organization. Students taking the course will use concepts and tools from several other Haas courses, including Economic Analysis for Business Decisions, Strategic Leadership, Leading People, Finance, and Problem Finding Problem Solving. As important, the student teams are expected to deliver the highest quality work and deliverables, genuine insights, innovative solutions, and real value on mission-critical client projects.
(F,SP)
 
Managing Innovation and Change  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 290I [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly Business Administration E274
Description: This course is designed to introduce students to the innovation process and its management. It provides an overview of technological change and links it to specific strategic challenges; examines the diverse elements of the innovation process and how they are managed; discusses the uneasy relationship between technology and the workforce; and examines challenges of managing innovation globally.
(F,SP)
 
Innovation in Services and Business Models  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 290K [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course examines services innovation, first covering key concepts, including how services innovation differs from product innovation, the role of openness in services, the role of business models, and co-creation. The course then introduces several tools and frameworks to apply those concepts to specific services situations. These include process design, process mapping and improvement, business models, co-creation, and platform innovation.
(F,SP) Chesbrough
 
Strategy for the Information Technology Firm  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 290S [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course is a strategy and general management course for students interested in pursuing careers in the global information technology industry. Students are taught to view the IT industry through the eyes of the general manager/CEO (whether at a start-up or an industry giant). They learn how to evaluate strategic options and their consequences, how to understand the perspectives of various industry players, and how to anticipate how they are likely to behave under various circumstances. These include the changing economics of production, the role network effects and standards have on adoption of new products and services, the tradeoffs among potential pricing strategies, and the regulatory and public policy context.
(F,SP)
 
Special Topics in Innovation and Design  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 290T [0.5-3 units]
Course Format: One-half to three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced study in the fields of innovation and design. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP)
 
Corporate Strategy in Telecommunications and Media  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 290V [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration 204.
Description: This course is intended for students who wish to gain better understanding of one of the most important issues facing management today--designing, implementing, and managing telecommunication and distributed computer systems. The following topics are covered: a survey of networking technologies; the selection, design, and management of telecommunication systems; strategies for distributed data processing; office automation; and management of personal computers in organizations.
(F,SP)
 
Active Communicating  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 291C [1 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of lecture for two weeks.
Description: This course develops the basic building blocks of impactful communication--e.g., concentration, energy, voice, physical expressiveness, spontaneity, listening, awareness, and presence--by drawing upon expertise from theater arts. Active, participatory exercises allow for the development and embodiment of effective communication skills. Class readings, lectures, and discussions address participants' specific workplace applications.
(F,SP)
 
Data Visualization for Discovery and Communication  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 291D [1 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of lecture for two weeks.
Description: This course exposes the problems of poor data presentation and introduces design practices necessary to communicate quantitative business information clearly, efficiently, and powerfully. This course identifies what to look for in the data and describes the types of graphs and visual analysis techniques most effective for spotting what is meaningful and making sense of it.
(F,SP)
 
Improvisational Leadership  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 291I [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This class explores the broad principles of improvisation, a performing art form that has developed pedagogical methods to enhance individual spontaneity, listening and awareness, expressive skills, risk-taking, and one's ability to make authentic social and emotional connections. The ultimate aim of the course is to help students develop an innovative and improvisational leadership mindset, sharpening in-the-moment decision making and the ability to quickly recognize and act upon opportunities when presented. In practical terms, this course strives to enhance students' business communication skills and increase both interpersonal intuition and confidence.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Leader as Coach  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 291L [1 units]
Course Format: One hour of lecture per week.
Description: This course focuses on the art and science of coaching including theory and practice. The curriculum will cover theory and practice for three aspects of the coaching process - knowledge-based (information and skills), motivation-based (inspiration and passion), and strategy-based (communication and integration). The curriculum will focus on primary coaching skills, tools, processes and behaviors that a coach uses. In addition, participants will learn facilitation skills as the preferred methodology in achieving successful coaching programs. Course participants will have the opportunity to utilize this material in practice coaching sessions with supervision and feedback from peers and the instructor.
(F,SP)
 
Storytelling for Leadership  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 291S [1 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture every other week.
Description: This course provides students with personal leadership development through the ability to tell "Who Am I" leadership journey stories, for use in the business context. For leaders, whose job it is to manage change, the approach to storytelling facilitates learning and is a vehicle to assist others in overcoming obstacles, generating enthusiasm and team work, sharing knowledge and ultimately leading to build trust and connection. This course give strategies, skills and practices for the three elements of telling powerful leadership stories: Story Content, Story Structure and Story Delivery. The course is highly interactive.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Topics In Managerial Communications  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 291T [1-3 units]
Course Format: One to three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly Business Administration 291B
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: This course will provide the student with specialized knowledge in some area of managerial communications. Topics include multimedia business presentations, personal leadership development, diversity management, and making meetings work. Topics will vary from semester to semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organizations  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 292A [2,3 units]
Course Format: Two to three hours of lecture per week.
Description: This course prepares students conceptually and practically to create, lead, and manage nonprofit organizations. Focuses on the centrality of the mission, governing board leadership, application of strategy and strategic planning, and strategic management of issues unique to or characteristic of the sector: performance measurement, program development, financial management, resource development, community relations and marketing, human resource management, advocacy, and management.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Nonprofit Boards  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 292B [1 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of lecture for two weeks.
Description: The purpose of this class is to acquaint Evening & Weekend Master of Business Administration students, many of whom will be asked to serve on nonprofit boards throughout their careers, with the nonprofit sector and the roles and responsibilities of nonprofit boards. Students will learn why nonprofit boards exist, how they are structured, how they differ from corporate boards, what their legal responsibilities are, how boards and chief executives relate to each other, and how boards contribute to the effectiveness of nonprofit organizations.
(F,SP)
 
Strategic CSR and Consulting Projects  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 292C [1-3 units]
Course Format: One to three hours of lecture per week.
Description: Discuss the field of strategic CSR through a series of lectures, guest speakers, and projects. This course will examine best practices used by companies to engage in socially responsible practices. It will provide students with a flavor of the complex dilemmas one can face in business in trying to do both "good for society" and "well for shareholders." It looks at CSR from a corporate strategy perspective, and how it supports core business objectives, core competencies, and bottom line profits.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Financial Management of Nonprofit Organizations  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 292F [1 units]
Course Format: Eight hours of lecture for two weeks.
Prerequisites: 203, financial experience, or equivalent.
Description: The course focuses on financial management issues faced by board members and senior and executive managers in nonprofit organizations. Students learn tools and techniques for effective planning and budgeting and how to control, evaluate and revise plans. Use and development of internal and external financial reports are studied with an emphasis on using financial information in decision making. Tools and techniques of financial statement analysis, interpretation, and presentation are practiced.
(F,SP)
 
Social Investing--Recent Findings in Management and Finance  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 292I [1 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks or eight hours of lecture per day on two Sundays.
Description: This course introduces the field of social investment. The use of ESG (environmental, social, and governance) criteria is becoming increasingly prevalent among both high net worth individuals and institutions. Many ethical and religious traditions advocate altruism and community-mindedness in all dealings, while some economic and financial theorists argue for a narrow focus on risk and reward, with little regard for the impact of decisions on stakeholder groups or the environment.
(F,SP) Kurtz
 
Haas Socially Responsible Investment Fund  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 292J [2 units]
Course Format: Two hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Evening and Weekend Masters in Business Administration 292I.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for a maximum of 6 units.
Description: In this course, students manage a real investment fund ($1.7 million +) focused on both social and financial returns. Through the Fund students have the opportunity to test the investment and corporate responsibility principles they have learned in the classroom, and to experience the complexities, challenges, and rewards of the investing world. Students have full responsibility for investment decisions, including conducting their own research on companies' environmental, social and governance (ESG) performance. Students receive guidance from both a faculty advisor and an advisory board. The faculty advisor provides regular input on portfolio management, understanding portfolio performance and ESG investing.
(F,SP)
 
Topics in Nonprofit and Public Management  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 292N [1-3 units]
Course Format: One to three hours of lecture per week.
Formerly Evening and Weekend Master in Business Administration 292M
Description: Advanced study in the field of nonprofit and public management. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Social Sector Solutions: Social Enterprise  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 292S [3 units]
Course Format: Three and one-half hours of lecture per week.
Description: The purpose of this course is to develop students' skills and knowledge in problem solving, management consulting, and nonprofit organizations. Instruction covers frameworks for problem solving, senior management consulting, and assessing nonprofit organizations. The course includes an assignment to a consultation team that works with a select nonprofit client to help them succeed in an entrepreneurial venture. A partnership with a professional management consulting firm, McKinsey & Company, the course includes experienced McKinsey consultants coaching each of the student teams.
(F,SP)
 
Topics in Socially Responsible Business  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 292T [0.5-3 units]
Course Format: One-half to three hours of lecture per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Description: Advanced study in the field of Socially Responsible Business. Topics will vary from year to year and will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
(F,SP)
 
Individually Supervised Study for Graduate Students  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 293 [1-5 units]
Course Format: One to five hours of independent study per week.
Credit option: Course may be repeated for credit.
Grading option: The course instructor will decide the grading option when the class is scheduled.
Description: Individually supervised study of subjects not available to the student in the regular schedule, approved by faculty adviser as appropriate for the student's program.
(F,SP) Staff
 
Curricular Practical Training Internship  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 293C 
Course Format:
Credit option: Course may be repeated.
Grading option: Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Description: This is an independent study course for international students doing internships under the Curricular Practical Training program. Requires a paper exploring how the theoretical constructs learned in MBA courses were applied during the internship.
(F,SP) Gent
 
Entrepreneurship  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 295A [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of evening lecture per week.
Prerequisites: Business Administration E206.
Formerly Business Administration E295
Description: The development of creative marketing strategies for new ventures, as well as the resolution of specific marketing problems in smaller companies which provide innovative goods and services. Emphasis is on decision making under conditions of weak data, inadequate resources, emerging markets, and rapidly changing environments.
(F,SP)
 
Venture Capital and Private Equity  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 295B [3 units]
Course Format: Three hours of lecture per week.
Prerequisites: 295A and 234 recommended.
Description: This is an advanced case-based course intended to provide the background, tools, and themes of the venture capital industry. The course is organized in four modules of the private equity cycle: (1) fund raising -- examines how private equity funds are raised and structured, (2) investing -- considers the interactions between private equity investors and the entrepreneurs that they finance, (3) exiting -- examines the process through which private equity investors exit their investments; and (4) new frontiers -- reviews many of the key ideas developed in the course.
(F,SP) Staff
 
New Venture Finance  --  Evening and Weekend Master's in Business Administration (EWMBA) 295D [2-3 units]
Course Format: Three and one-half hours of lecture